P320 Blows Up But Keeps On Working

A friend shared this with me. Upon his request he wishes to remain anonymous. He witnessed a catastrophic malfunction with someone’s Sig P320 Tacops.

It was a box stock SIG P320 Tac Ops. The ammo was reloaded and was believed to be a double charge because of the amount of brass flow

Now the ammo in question was reloaded on a Dillon 1050 and the reloader says he is diligent in his reloading processes. Murphy finds a way apparently.

The amazing thing is that the shooter was not seriously hurt but also they swapped the internals into another grip module and the gun continued to work.

I took a set of Digital calipers measure the barrel chamber the fire control unit which by the way was completely unharmed put a different group. Had to replace the extractor and all other components in the slide just to be on the safe side and ran about 35 rounds through it

Damage to the gun was obviously the Plastic Grip Panel, the extractor was sent into orbit. the shooter had one piece of brass in the top of his strong finger ( from ejection port, and something cut his upper lip) ( he WAS wearing eye protection) the magazine was not harmed. The gun was detail stripped and the Extractor, and all parts in the slide were replaced as a precaution. The Fire control unit was inspected and cleaned then placed in a new grip module.

Accuracy has been tested as well and not affected.

Pretty amazing that the gun still works! Is this a testament to Sig Sauer build quality? Or a one in a million chance that everything went well as much as possible?

And in case you might think this is an isolated issue, I have different source, who also wishes to remain anonymous, also experienced something similar.

My daughter had a factory double charge go off in her p320. Besides scaring the hell out of her she was fine. She actually finished the match with that gun.
I put a new extractor in, changed the grip, fired 200 rounds real quick to function check.
She is still shooting the same gun to this day. Only thing that was changed was the frame & extractor. This was 7months & about 10,000 rounds later. With same fcu, striker, slide, extractor spring.
Below are photos of the casing.
That’s right, the P320 exploded, the father had spare parts on hand and they rebuilt the pistol during the match. Test fired 200 rounds just to be sure and the daughter finished the match. That is rather impressive.




Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • nova3930

    Modular design wins. Even if you damaged some of the fire control module, it probably wouldn’t be the serial numbered perimeter frame.

    • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

      And from what Ive gathered Sig will sell you a complete build kit for a P320 FCU so if all you have is the stamped sheet metal you can replace all the little bits and springs.

      It makes me wonder why nobody is selling 80% FCUs.

      • Ebby123

        THIS NEEDS TO HAPPEN^^^

      • John Bear Ross

        Folks out there are already trying. Google searches for 80% P320 or P250 FCU yields good results.

        Best,
        JBR

        • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

          I guess its been a while since Ive checked

  • it’s just Boris

    “Pretty amazing that the gun still works!”

    I think we have rather different definitions of what “the gun” is.

    Granted many components were salvageable. This includes the serialized portion. But given what was destroyed, lost, or precautionary replaced, it’s not the same gun.

    As an analogy, if I have a car with severe body damage, but transplant the still workable engine into another frame, with new body panels and interior, is it the same car?

    • J.T.

      No, because the frame is what has the VIN on it. The frame is what is considered the car. This is more like replacing all the doors and body panels, but keeping the frame and engine.

      • Tj92

        I hate to be that guy but 99% Of The time it is The body that The VIN follows, or more specifically whatever piece Of The body The VIN tag is affixed to (usually cowl) . Usually The frame isn’t even serialized. This doesn’t matter though as modern cars The frame and body are The same with The VIN tag being on a structural part which could be considered “The frame”

        • Kivaari

          There are probably a dozen vin numbers placed on hidden parts of the frame and body. The visible plate is only one open marking. Some take a mirror to read as they are on frame and body parts that are not visible from the “outside”. This is so chop shops have a harder time cutting up a car for resale of parts without risk of detection.

          • Sunshine_Shooter

            Shoot, nowadays they are even putting VIN numbers on the individual doors to try and combat chop shops.

          • nicholsda

            If you worked where I did, we’d find identical cars in the canal with part A removed from one car and part B from another as that was what the customer wanted. Customer being the chop shop’s parts buyer. My ex-employer at times has pulled up to 300 cars in a year out of canals that were stolen for parts/insurance ripoffs. How do you know which is which? Chop shop cars don’t have concrete blocks on the gas pedal and chop shop cars are more likely to be in groups of two or three.

      • Nicholas C

        Are you not familiar with the P320? The grip module (what we consider the frame) is NOT the serialized part of the gun. The FCU (Fire Control Unit) is the serialized part. So the trigger pack is removable and you can swap a different grip module and it is still the same gun.

    • iksnilol

      The Sig is imo more like if you changed head gasked on a car.

  • Tim

    Sure, I’ll shoot reloads. Not *your* reloads. But I’ll shoots reloads.

    • Paul Strickland

      Agree….I will no longer buy or shoot reloads other than my own. Years ago shooting “someone else’s” overloaded 30.06 ammo resulted in a scope impact and a broken nose. True story…(((sniff)))

      • Jason Lewis

        I get nervous that people shoot my reloads all the time.

        • Paul Strickland

          Agree again….I will only load .38 spec. light range or target loads for others. Just something to punch holes in paper or ring a plate out around 25 – 50 yrds. My friends and I all have .357 revolvers that we like to shoot light stuff to save wear and tear on these classic guns. I tell them if they want anything more powerful, go buy some factory ammo and save me the brass.

          • Jason Lewis

            Yep. In the tens of thousands of my reloads I’ve shot I’ve had one squib load and it was in 38 sp. Of course it was enough charge to push the bullet into the barrel. I recognized it as soon as it happened. If I hadn’t I could have easily pulled the trigger again with catastrophic consequences. This will happen with factory ammo if people shoot often enough. I would hate it if my buddies blew up their gun due to not recognizing a squib.

          • Paul Strickland

            Been there Jason, once in my early reloading days, (’80-’81), a friend shooting my S&W M-13, .357, had a squib with one of my loads. Not realizing what happened he fired again. Both bullets key-holed in the target. Both gun and shooter, thankfully, were unharmed. The combination of this being a light .38 load and the 13’s heavy barrel saved the day. But I learned a valuable reloading lesson. I now always use a shell loading block that makes it easy to inspect the charge before seating the bullets.

            Note, recently I found a factory round with an upside-down primer….s#!t happens to the best of us. Be safe.

  • Gregory

    The chamber walls may have microscopic fractures that could lead to a total failure. It would be prudent to replace the barrel.

    • Phillip Cooper

      Easy to check with a magnaflux exam at a machine shop.

      • Kurt Ingalls

        Oh , that’s true, my neighbor has one in his back yard…..dummy…………. 🙂

    • Wow!

      A kaboom actually puts less stress on the barrel than a normal firing sequence since gases are vented more out the chamber as well as the muzzle.

  • Alex

    How does one double charge 9mm?

    • 300 wm

      Not paying attention during the charging process. A standard charge is probably about 5-6 grains of powder if I would hazard a guess.

      • Alex

        I reload 9mm with Vectan A1 (i am in europe). 5 grains of it and the case is nearly full. Definitely no space for a double charge.

        • richard scalzo

          Must be a very slow burning powder. In the US, Titegroup is probably the most popular (at least in competitions). 3.2 – 3.4 is normal.

      • richard scalzo

        Not even close tp 5 to 6 grains. A 3.2 gn load for 147 is the norm.

        • Charles Chenet

          You have got to kidding right. Are you trying to remove your hands. No more than 4 gr of TG with a 147gr. Not directed at you Richard.

      • Charles Chenet

        The 1050 dillon is a comercial machine not entry level. You cannot reverse the shell plate and double charge. Dillon powder drops are about the best you can get for a progressive press. That has got to be a weak case.
        20,000 plus psi coming out the wrong end of anything is going to screw up whatever its attached to.
        If your competing on a regular basis then you’re shooting reloads. Its safe to assume the shooter was not left handed.

    • datimes

      Powder like Bullseye and Titegroup do not occupy much interior case volume and may easily be double charged through carelessness, inattention, distraction, ignorance, or other reasons.

      • Alex

        Ok. Not familiar with both powders. Thank you.

      • noob

        I wonder if the russian GSh-18 calls that standard charge for their super hot ap rounds

    • ExMachina1

      Low volume powder

    • neckbone

      Very uncarefully?

    • Nick

      Depends on powder. Some can’t be overcharged without having to compress the powder a ridiculous amount. Since this was on a Dillon (known for accuracy and reliability) I’m kinda curious how it happened. Mine has a fail safe lever to prevent double charging (it won’t drop another charge until the carriage rotates to the next case).

      He should’ve spent the $70 and got their powder cop. It works fairly well, and would spot a double charge and sound an audible alarm. Considering the 1050 is really expensive, not sure why he wouldn’t have one.

  • datimes

    I found three or four 9mm brass cases out at the range that look like the photo below. I couldn’t understand why someone would continue to fire with obvious malfunctions //uploads.disquscdn.com/images/31eb4204b7e94a861a85fb0e8d53eab7b2d449ea48bd7fad331d11612720e983.jpg e would continue to fire their weapon discharging obviously damaged cases.

    • GaryOlson

      Nothing says mall-ninja like flames shooting out the ejection port?!

      • Sunshine_Shooter

        Chamber porting, helps to reduce side-to-side recoil, allowing the operator to maintain dynamic control of the weapon system platform in non-advantageous conditions within contested environments.

        • Colonel K

          Just like my friends old Yugo. Well, that and the unique passenger side push starter.

    • tarnishedcopper

      probably some idiot that didn’t know any better…

  • John McPherson

    Lots of “double loads” no fired out of battery. The latter could account for the lack of damage to other parts of the gun.

    • Pumpkin King XXIII

      Thank goodness I read the comments before posting. My thoughts exactly.

  • GD Ajax

    European pistol blows up it still works. 1911 blows up and you lose a finger.

    • Tom J

      By European, you mean designed and made in the USA, by an American subsidiary of a European company?

      Get off you high horse. Every gun has failures. Given the extreme forces exerted on a firearm, it’s really amazing the there are so few failures. Even then, most catastrophic failures can be attributed to bad ammo.

      • Sean

        The P320, like the P250 was designed by SIG in Germany. It is made in NH though.

    • No one

      You have a very strange definition of “still works” if you think “required an entire slide and barrel replacement to keep running” means working.

      Even then, I doubt he would’ve still fired with pieces of brass in his finger and cuts on his lip which also happened according to the story.

      • No one

        And for the record, I’m not a 1911A1 fanboy in the slightest.

      • richard scalzo

        They replaced the extractor and put on a new grip module. Minor parts easily replaced in a few minutes.

    • koolhed

      These EuroDouchers always crack me up. The other day, I read one that wrote “No American firearm design has gotten worldwide acceptance, only European designs can do this.”

      • nicholsda

        Guess they never looked at the M1 Carbine or M1 Rifle. Used in Europe, Asia, South America, and still being found on the battlefields of Africa and the ME/SW Asia.

    • Norm Glitz

      I double charged a 1911A1 once. While it was exciting, I didn’t lose any fingers or anything else. The mag blew out the bottom and the slide got spread a bit. I squeezed the slide back into shape and all was well. I’m still shooting it and using the same magazine years later.

    • Alex Yamach

      Bedwetter, if you’re going to drool a stupid, false comment like your’s, grow a pair & at least get a real Disqus ID.

      Does anyone think that the 1911 design would be still be in production for over 100 years if they commonly did what you have claimed?

      Of course not. Now, get off your mommy’s PC, and go outside and play…..

    • nicholsda

      Let me know when the first issued Glock turns 100. Because there are still 1911s around that are over 100 years old and still are going strong.

  • iksnilol

    It outglocked the glock… well played, Sig.

    • Sab zero

      Well, not really. It just proved the fire control unit could resist some kind of bad ammo. Glock is still very much ahead in the reliability department, even though the P320 is a good gun and a sweet gun to shoot.

      • iksnilol

        Glocks either explode or keep chugging. The Sig did both at once.

        • Sab zero

          You can’t just take a very precise exemple of a certain type of bad ammo and say “see folks, Sigs are better than Glocks”. This isn’t how this works bro.
          You should take look at Swat magazine’s april issue (you can find it online). It has a very detailed article about the Glock 17M/19M (and good pics), and how it blasted the P320 in the reliability department during the FBI testing, firing up to 120 000 rounds without a malfunction. It also supports what LAV has said about the P320 – they “miserably failed” (and I’m quoting) de FBI evaluation.
          I’m not bashing the P320 or the company itself, I’m actually a fan of their lastest red dots (Romeo 4T/S), and I do believe the P320 is indeed one of the top handguns today. But it is behind in terms of reliability.

          • iksnilol

            Dude, I come here to make a couple of quick jokes, cash in some points and maybe get a chuckle or two.

            For me personally, handguns are like underwear. Everyone has their preference and at the end of the day it is largely irrelevant.

          • Sab zero

            I can’t disagree !

          • Ripley

            When underwear catastrophically malfunctions you have a bad day and maybe the people around you. You can blame the burrito but without spare parts or replacement you will feel bare.

          • Louis Bethel

            Who wears underwear?

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            LOL!

          • Colonel K

            That depends. What day is it?

          • Ripley

            I wear, concealed. Not open carry like street thugs.

          • JohnnyCuredents

            After what we’ve seen in recent months, I wouldn’t believe ANYTHING the FBI said. Their acronym now stands for Funny Business, Inc. I’ll take DoD’s word that the P-320 is reliable and stuff the FBI’s assessment in the “More Of Comey’s Lies” file.

          • joe

            The same DoD that “lost” a trillion dollars? You’re in need of reading ‘War is a Racket’.

          • JohnnyCuredents

            My comment wasn’t an endorsement of the DoD so much as a rejection of the FBI. The latter hasn’t had such poor leadership since the days of Johnny & Clyde.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            I have two I won’t even shoot. I think I should sell them. One is a .40 with a .357 conversion full size and the other is the compact in .357. I’ve had TOO MANY ISSUES with the full sized to feel confident shooting it. Mainly early extraction issues that have blown factory ammo. SIG claims it’s the ammo. Speer claims its the gun design. Speer says EARLY EXTRACTION. Evidence supports it. Look for sig p320 problems…issues….complaints on Facebook.

          • JohnnyCuredents

            I like SIGs & I carry the older sister of the P-320, the P-250, because I dislike striker-fired weapons. I’ve put 2000+ rds through the 250, a lot of it real junk, with absolutely NO problems of any description. That said, my preferred carry weapon is a S&W 642 with semi-wad cutters in straight .38 Sp. It’s uncomplicated and reliable, has a very long history, is couldn’t-ask-for-more safe, light and extremely easy to carry, and, in all but WW III situations, it gets the job done. Romantically speaking, it also hearkens back to a world much less complicate and more sane, the world Joe Friday understood perfectly.

        • Gunslinger

          Actually, that isn’t true. It exploded, got repaired and then continued. If they had not had extra parts on hand, it would have been down for the count.

          • iksnilol

            Pfft, just an extractor.

          • Gunslinger

            lol. That shit’ll buff out.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            Just an extractor is down for the count.

          • iksnilol

            Eh, not really, guns can work somewhat fine without an extractor. Ejector on the other hand is more important.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            Great, I always want to rely on a gun that can work “somewhat fine”. NOT!

          • iksnilol

            You do know that the “NOT!” joke is deader than John F. Kennedy? Right?

            And it is true, blowback guns work fine without an extractor (many don’t even have one). Whilst for tilting barrel guns (IE 1911s, Glocks, etc.) you need a suppressor. But other than that it runs just fine.

            Ffs, James R. tested it as well.

        • Wow!

          Glocks do the exact same thing, they can fire again with just replacing the extractor (or using the same extractor if you find it). When it happens to glocks people complain about kaboom. When it happens sigs they herald it as a great reliability feat. It’s a double standard.

          • iksnilol

            Well, usually when a Glock kabooms you get a ruined frame.

    • Esteban Cafe

      Except the Glock would not fall apart. Swap the barrel until you can get it checked and finish the shoot.

    • Shiller Tiller

      Except that no other pistol is as light and small as the 19 even in 2017. Not saying the 320 is bad, I have one, but the Glock is the most size and weight efficient pistol to date. No other gun company has gotten the low bore axis, 4 inch barrel, and 15 round mag capacity memo. The VP9 is still larger and heavier, the 320c is too big with a shorter barrel and a derp bore axis. The 320’s modularity is a joke when it cost almost the same to just buy another pistol than convert

      • iksnilol

        GOD DAMNIT, CAN A MAN MAKE A JOKE IN PEACE!?

      • Sean

        Why do so many people make a big deal about the bore axis?

        I shot a Sig P226 side by side with a G19 Gen4 and HK P30. The P30 was by far the flattest shooting followed closely by the P226. The G19 Gen 4 felt the more snappy. But at the end of the day, anyone can shoot a 9mm.

        Recoil/muzzle rise has more to do with: how you hold the gun and your stance, how the frame handles the recoil, how the recoil spring is set up, the gun’s ergonomics, and other factors. Look how high a revolver’s bore axis is yet were used for decades.

        Sig’s conversion kits MSRP is $407 and can be found for cheaper. That is not bad considering they send you everything (slide/barrel/magazine/guide rod) minus the FCG. You don’t have to purchase a new gun at a gun store, you can have the parts mailed directly to you, and you have the identical controls (trigger, slide stop, mag release) that your previous setup has. If you crack your frame or want a different color, you can get a new one for around $50. It’s modularity is why this gun is such a hot seller and partly why it is our Army’s new handgun.

        The Sig’s barrel is shorter by 0.1 inch. The P320C barrel is 3.9 in. while a G19 is 4.0 in. How does 0.1 inches make a difference? the SIG is more accurate that the Glock anyway.

        Your weight comparison is silly:
        Glock 19 Gen 4 – 23.7 oz
        Sig P320 Compact – 25.8 oz

        I highly doubt two ounce difference are noticeable. Two ounces = 12 nickels.

  • Noishkel

    You know I had an Argentine Hi-Power that had a bad round that blew out like that. Although being all metal the gun wasn’t damaged other than the magazine was blown out from the over pressure. Didn’t do a damn thing to the gun itself and it still works to this day. X3

    • noob

      Somebody should make a cnc milled, tempered and nitride coated all steel aftermarket p320 grip with a flared and beveled magwell. That way you could have a kaboom mid match and possibly rectify by prising out the brass, reinserting the magazine, saying a prayer and continuing

  • Polaritypictures Ken

    I’ve noticed tha several barrels from many manufactuerers have uncovered rear breeches, leaving open the case head in areas that would seem an invitation of case weaknesses. if the whole case is excapsulated by the barrel would there be little less issues with case ruptures?

  • Kurt Ingalls

    Nice….no worries…..I can shoot “offhand” and clutch a towel with the other….YESH!!!! 🙂

  • FOC Ewe

    It did not continue to function, the parts were swapped out in the slide and the frame was replaced.

    • Sunshine_Shooter

      *grip was replaced. The frame was still intact and functional, hence the main point of the article.

      • FOC Ewe

        If I total my truck but pull the motor and put it in another it’s the same truck? Where the s/n is semantics as the pistol did not “keep working” after a malfuntion. It was rebuilt after being disabled aka paperweight.

        • richard scalzo

          You clearly don’t have a clue. I guess if you change the grips, it’s a totally new firearm.

        • nicholsda

          More like you crunch your truck and replaced the fenders and grill. Still the same truck and serial number. The grip in a P250 or P320 is just bodywork. The extractor would be like a door handle needing replaced.

    • richard scalzo

      The frame was not replaced. Obviously you have no knowledge of the 320. The grip module is not the “frame” and is intended to be swapped as it’s a modular concept. The FCU is the working part of the handgun.

  • Charles Chenet

    Not buying the double charge out of the 1050. Too many other factors present.

    • Pumpkin King XXIII

      Yep, 1050 is a set it and forget it rig. if it was a double charge on a 1050 I would bet every round he loaded was a double charge.

      • Nick

        My thoughts exactly. Don’t have a 1050, but I love the 650. Pretty much impossible to unintentionally double charge. Add to that the powder cop in station 3 and it really makes you wonder how it happened. I assuming he’d have one, can’t see spending so much on the 1050 without buying a powder checker.

        And the powder measure is spot on. Holds even my tiny 4.0 grain charge for subsonics to within 1/10 of a grain. Couldn’t ask for a better setup.

  • Reazione Catena

    This inho is not a gun issue it is an ammo issue; ammo blows up causing guns to do the same…gun fed good ammo no issue

    • Dr. Longfellow Buchenrad

      The tone of the article appears to be praising how the gun handled bad ammo rather than knocking it for failing at all. Pretty much any gun will fail on a double charge. Some just do it more gracefully (and inexpensively) than others.

  • No one

    “SIGnade” has a much better ring to it then “Glocknamed.

  • ExMachina1

    Aaaaad I’m buying a P320. That’s degree of robustness is unsurpassed IMO

    • No one

      …….

      The barrel and Slide were completely written off, how is that some exceptional example of robustness? the article is inaccurate if anything.

      • richard scalzo

        The barrel and slide were not “written off”. the extractor was replaced which takes about thirty seconds if one is on hand.

      • ExMachina1

        Wow. That was a pretty short article yet you apparently did not read it. The barrel was retained and the slide was retained. Internal slide components were all that was replaced. That’s pretty effin’ robust!

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      So, in reality, the gun was destroyed and the barrel and slide were reused.

  • Vet for Trump

    How the heck can one double charge a 9mm. case?
    When I accidentally did it once, the powder overflowed the case all over the bench.
    Depending the powder and bullet, a normal charge is 3.6 to 4.6 grains.
    How does one fit 7 to 9 grains in that little case?
    Yes, I reload 9mm. for 5 years now.

    • Kivaari

      Try Bullseye. In a progressive machine what doesn’t fit in the case spills out and the next stage seats the bullet. So a compressed 150% charge really has high pressure.

      • BraveNewWhirled

        This is all geek to me. Interesting though.

    • Ruru Ru

      3.8 grains of Titegroup fills less than half a 9mm case IIRC. If you’re truly careless, I think it might be possible to triple charge with that powder.

    • richard scalzo

      Look at a load of 3.4 of Titegroup. It’s very easy.

  • TaDead!

    “But reloads are CHEAP!”
    Now you know why.

  • Eric X Ericx

    “I felt a
    great disturbance in the Force, as if millions of voices suddenly cried
    out in terror, and were suddenly silenced. I fear something terrible has
    happened.”
    Those voices were the Glock fanboys who still claim their POS is better than the P320 reading this article! 😉

    • No one

      Man, if anyone ever wondered why SIG fanboys are the most annoying demographic in the firearms industry (well, next to hardcore H&K fanboys), look no further.

    • MichaelZWilliamson

      So, the Sig fared less well than a Glock, but is somehow better.

      The 1911 fan laughs at you.

  • zlittle

    My reloads, yes. Yours, not a chance. Still the ‘glock wouldn’t do that’ and S&W would handle that crap is just that. I’ve seen Glock fire when they had no business doing so and an N frame Smith blow up from a double charge. The most impressive was a .44 redhawk with the casing welded to the chamber. Couldn’t load that one so the guy just loaded 5 and kept shooting. Until something like this happens, everyone with a Dillon is an expert.

    • Steve T

      Yes, mechanical things can malfunction no matter what fail safe equipment is on them. Dillon snobbery is entertaining at the range. Thousands of rounds were loaded out of my “other brand” set-up. Due caution is always the rule.

  • datimes

    This one is WCC and it’s obviously a reload. Glock firing pin impression. I recently acquired 500 rounds of 124 gr. Winchester white box (NATO) that did not function well in my MP-40 and usually welcome once fired brass. I’ll be on the look out. Thanks.

  • The Deplorable Boogur T. Wang

    at’ll buff right out…no problem.

  • J.E.Walker

    Reloading is so much fun… and sometimes so exciting! And it saves you so much money. Well, except for the medical bills and occasional kaboomed gun replacement. 😉

  • Steve T

    Hot reload is my guess too. Re-loaders sometimes play with some dangerous powders. Bullseye will destroy a gun in a double load situation.It can happen. I had a Browning HP crack a frame from a hot load. Extra-light is safer, you’ll see an overload spilling out of the shell. And it’s plenty powerful for practice. I developed some very hot loads for a Makarov, years ago. I’d verify each load before proceeding. It took lots of time for sure. It was worth it though.

  • Chris

    Not sure if this applies, but my Sig is the only pistol I’ve owned that specifically states in the manual that +p ammo may be used without voiding the waranty.

    • 2ThinkN_Do2

      I have a variety of firearms that say +P ammo is okay; they do say you should not make it a regular diet however. They also say: you should never shoot +P+ ammo. I have few firearms that say anything about a voided warranty for shooting +P or that you should not. In fact, the only one I know of, is the Ruger LCP.

  • Leigh Rich

    This always happens on someones reloads.

  • Brent Kauser

    Something sounds fishey in his statement.
    Why would the guy rebuild a gun that he witnessed blow up at a range that belonged to someone he didn’t know?
    Then he said, the extractor was sent into orbit and couldn’t be located, but he says that during the frane swap he replaced the extractor just as a precaution.
    Too many loop holes in his statement.

    • richard scalzo

      You get a replacement extractor.

  • Louis Bethel

    The reloader needs to redefine the term “diligent”.

  • Brent Kauser

    Quit reloading if you don’t know what you’re doing.

  • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

    AMMO…YES…you can tell because the primer blew clean out too. But after that happened who in their right mind would keep shooting the firearm? Especially if the ammo was in question. Did the operator have a death wish or maybe lots of good health insurance?

  • srhymer

    Is it really the “same gun” if you replace most of the thing? It’s got the same serial number…so legally it is.

  • BraveNewWhirled

    I’ll wait for Gen 2.

  • 2ThinkN_Do2

    The most unusual issues I’ve had with handguns have all been with . . . Sigs. Three Sigs, all had issues of one type or another. P232, P290RS and P938SAS.

  • David S

    This is what the 357 Sig is for. So you can safely shoot high pressure 9mm rounds. 9mm +P+++ is not a good idea.

  • Mac

    What caliber was it, or did I miss something ?

  • atmar

    i noticed it exploded in the unsupported area …

  • Kodi

    While I don’t own or use a Dillon 1050 I do own and use a Dillon SDB and a 650. All Dillon’s use the same case activated powder measure from the SDB to the 1050.
    All except the 550 are auto-indexing and difficult to short stroke without knowing it. If the reloader had said he used a 550 and forgot to manually index the shell plate, that would make more sense. Dillon says double charges are not possible on their auto-indexing presses if full handle strokes are made.
    Puzzling and reminds us of the need to be extra vigilant while loading/reloading.

  • Jarhead0369

    Same thing happened with an S&W model 99 my wife owns. Nothing to do with the gun, except an unsupported chamber. Factory ammo. Excrement Occurs.

  • John Wisch

    Hell of a story for April Fool’s Day have you seen the new Hornady ammunition that has a miniature camera in the bullet tip so you can watch it on your iPhone or Android as it flies down range it impacts the target. That’s pretty cool for April Fool’s Day too

  • tarnishedcopper

    I wonder if there was either a brass failure, perhaps a stress crack, or maybe the round somehow fired before it was completely in battery. Did the shooter mention excessive recoil? Perhaps it wasn’t an over-pressure load.

  • Michael Dietz

    The Glock has the best method of reliability. K.I.S.S. method (keep it simple stupid) In my humble opinion I believe the multiple purpose, and over complicated Sig platform is a recipe for failure. Eventually the bureaucracy will see the light and go with the Glock.

  • Johnny Lodern

    If your splitting all your cases like that then something is very WRONG.

    • Esteban Cafe

      Yep, mine do that…but only after 9-10 reloads. Doesn’t mark his reloads so he probably has NO idea how many time each case has been reloaded. Bad practice.

      • Wow!

        With precision rifle loads or bottlenecked rounds where you don’t trim after every reload, it is important to segregate lots (don’t mark. All markings rub off after a run through the tumbler, and you should be tumbling after every firing) for trimming regimens, but for general pinking the practice is redundant. Cases will split at the neck as shown above after it wears out and this happens long before actually dangerous situations happen such as case head separation. Especially for subcalibers, I just shoot a mixed bag and after I tumble the brass, I shake it in small lots to identify the cracked cases which make a tinkling noise.

      • DwnRange

        These are NOT reloads, plain ole factory Fiocchi 9mm ammunition.

    • Wow!

      There are many of lots of factory ammo that develop split cases on unfired ammo due to overstress crimps from the factory. This is seen less today, but it is common to find vintage boxes where a crack has developed down the side of the case.

      • Johnny Lodern

        I have boxes of factory 357 mag 38 special from 1976 with no signs of cracks on cases, have 30-30 also with no signs of cracks and haven’t cracked when fired. have some that are going in scrap as someone left them in leather belt loops , pulled out and they are green them I don’t fire.

        • Wow!

          It’s actually fine to shoot cases that are green. A little oxidation is so thin it doesn’t affect the cases integrity unless you reload it a lot afterwards. I have a lot of x54 brass that also oxidized but they fired and reloaded fine.

    • DwnRange

      You are looking at the only cases that split outta the box of 50 shown – don’t blame Glock for defective ammo sold by Fiocchi.

      I am simply happy I wasn’t firing another “brand” of handgun. Actually my ’86 G17 handled reloaded “defective” 9mm ammo with a blow-out similar to the above Sig 320 (rear side of brass blown out) with out any damage at all save a minor sing’d hand, so the rounds above were no problem.

  • Johnny Lodern

    When I reload I use a single stage press, load 20 to 50 cases with powder, inspect all cases to insure all are the same level THEN I put bullets in the cases then start the next batch, it is slower but I get better accuracy and after over 30 years have never had over/under charge with my reloads,
    as powder settles in the powder measure it can change the amount of powder it drops each time you operate it so it is a good idea to throw every 5th charge on the scale.
    when I get a high/low charge I dump the last 5 adjust the powder measure and continue, first 5 every charge goes on the scale, next 10 every other one goes on the scale, after that every 5th charge goes on the scale.

  • Esteban Cafe

    Back pressure indicates that he had a round half way down the barrel–very low powder or just primer will do that–THEN he cycled a new round, pulled the trigger and “Poof!.”

    I did the same with a Glock 17, but nothing fell off the gun. Just popped out the blistered case and swapped the barrel until I could get it checked. Finished the comp. Still shooting that gun today.

    • Curmudgeon

      Unlikely.

      I had a bad batch of ammo with some lacking powder charges. My son fired one, it send the bullet just past the throat and he tapped, racked and banged it. No case failure, just a bulge in the barrel just big enough to “lock” the slide back.

  • Wow!

    This is the double standard Glock has to deal with. Most guns when they blow up are destroyed. Glock comes out with a design where when a kaboom does happen, the mag drops out and the ejector flys out with no damage to any internals. Then they get mocked for kabooms.

    SIG uses the same overall design as Glock. They get kaboom and are praised for the same thing Glock was condemned for. Gaston shakes his head in disbelief.

  • Paul Strickland

    I have two 320s, both 9mms and love them. After a year and half and 1500 rounds I’ve had exactly one failure. A failure to eject with one round of some steel case ammo….but only one. I have a compact and a sub…I really want the new 5X Target.

  • Richard Lutz

    Where can I buy the version that does not explode?

  • MichaelZWilliamson

    So, in reality, the gun was destroyed and the barrel and slide were reused.

  • MichaelZWilliamson

    Also, I see warpage at the front of the slide.

    So perhaps the barrel is still original.

    But it occupies the same space as the original pistol, right?

  • Kurt Ingalls

    LOL…..I’m an aircraft mech, 31 years…..your looking at more money to do these tests than the damn gun is worth……now, if one is curious, fine……otherwise chunk it, buy a new one or better yet get a Glock or some “other” striker fired weapon…..easier on the pocket book 🙂

    • Phillip Cooper

      You must be a bit rusty. Magnaflux can be done at home, simply, for less than $20.

      Less than $2 if you can borrow a couple strong magnets.

      Totally freakin’ free if you crack open an “empty” toner cartridge.

  • Shiller Tiller

    People say the Glock is blocky and clunky? Jeez. The Glock19 feels sleek when I go from my p320c to my G19.

  • Jason Lewis

    I get some of my 10mm reloads that end up splitting after 4 or 5 reloads. Fully supported chamber you don’t need to worry about it. You’ll see the splits before you reload the brass. Just discard them.

    • DwnRange

      These were FACTORY Fiocchi 9mm rounds, not reloaded ammunition.

  • machgman

    Regardless if its a Glock, S&W, Colt, H&K, Sig, Kimber, Taurus, Walther, or etc, if you load and shoot bad ammo, no firearm is immune from being damaged.

  • James Kelly

    This broken frame was polymer, right? Wunner what would have happened to a steel frame.
    BTW DwnRange, you didn’t happen to store that Fiocchi ammo near the kitty litter, did you? The ammonia-like fumes do crack brass.

  • Danzo

    Fired a quick 200 rounds?