New ATN X-TRAC Wireless Remote Control Device

ATN has introduced a remote control device for its Smart HD optics. This little device called X-TRAC (Tactical Remote Access Control) attaches to the weapon in a place convenient for the support hand to reach. It is a wireless controller and connects to the scope via Bluetooth allowing to control all the functions of the scope. It features six tactile buttons and a roller.

 

For adjusting the zoom of the scope, you need to use the roller.

The controls on the device also let you take photos and record video without touching the scope.

 

X-TRAC also allows to control the all other settings of the scope (ballistic calculator, range finder, environmental adjustments etc.) by browsing through the scope menu using its buttons.

This device is powered by a single CR2450 battery with 6 plus months of battery life. It weighs 1.76 oz (50 grams) and has the following dimensions: 3.2″x2″x0.8″. The controller is also water resistant. Although this product is not yet available for purchase (with “Coming Soon” status), it is already priced at $79. It is expected to be available for shipping in April 2017, but preorders are accepted by most dealers. ATN will also cover the device with a two-year warranty.

I think this kind of devices of wireless control of gun mounted accessories will become some kind of a “trend” on the market. A good recent example of another wireless solution is Crimson Trace LINQ system. I hope we’ll see more companies coming up with such gadgets.





Hrachya H

I was born and currently live in Armenia, where I work in a family business of leather goods manufacturing. Being a retired sergeant of my country’s armed forces and a lifelong firearms enthusiast, I always enjoy studying firearms design, technology and history. Also my knowledge of Russian allows me to translate and make Russian/Soviet/Combloc small arms related information available for the English speaking audience.
Should you need to contact me, feel free to shoot me a message at TFBHrachyaH@gmail.com


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  • TheNotoriousIUD

    But will it charge my phone?

  • Justin

    When you have to start worrying about a firewall or anti-virus for your optics I think it may be a solution looking for a problem or a problem in the guise of innovation.

    • DT

      yeah.. but still a pretty niffty toy.

  • Trevor

    Not sure a ~1 foot run of remote wire is so bad it requires a wireless solution. Now 2 things need batteries instead of one. I think a corded remote would have been cheaper and more reliable.

    • I disagree. Cables snag on gear and brush, they’ve got to be routed, they can fail if they get too hot, and are otherwise inconvenient. This Bluetooth device really looks quite appealing as a way to adjust your scope without having to take your support hand out of position.

      • Wow!

        Cords can be run through the stock, or bound to the outside covered by duct tape and secured with zip ties. We run lights with cords with no issue. Snagging shouldn’t be a problem with a proper setup.

        • “No cables” will always beat “cables” in terms of snagging. I don’t see how this is even debatable. Whether that makes up for a more rigorous battery maintenance schedule is perhaps more debatable, but this is for a scope that requires batteries to function in the first place, and will still function without the remote, so… again, not feeling compelling logic against going wireless in this case.

          • Wow!

            Snagging is a non-factor. If anything is going to snag it would be your sling, and yet we don’t get that tied up on much of anything, and like I said, we can prevent snagging by running lines through the stock or tying it down like we do with our existing light/lasers.

            Any serious use of electronics requires reliability just like any mechanical gear. Wireless connections are prone to interference which is a huge disadvantage. I hear that the military uses RF jammers every so often, but I know at least that many modern situations that require rifles require use of jammers.

            We use radios and GPS, but we still learn and use hand signals and map/compass for a reason. Wireless signals are never 100% secure or reliable, and as long as the technology race continues, this fact will remain.

  • D

    Trevor is so right, that tiny distance is NOT worth the needless-complex wireless stuff.

  • nova3930

    Compatible with gen 1?

  • Wow!

    I can see this as being pretty useful with the remote on the buttstock. On the other hand, the only thing aside from recreation I can see this being used for is political correctness micromanaging LE snipers. It was bad enough when radio headsets were common place, we don’t need more intervention bothering them when they have to focus on the situation as it develops.

    Maybe it could be wired to a spotter who can immediately dial the adjustments he calculates? I don’t know. The two man shooter team kind of has dissolved in recent years due to the development of better reticles and more reliance on holdovers, as well as the need for two guns to cover larger areas at closer range than one gun at long range.

  • Colonel K

    I long for the days when all I needed were iron sights and a tin can.