Modern Historical Personal Defense Weapon Calibers 006: The .30 M1 Carbine

Left to right: .351 WSL, .30 M1 Carbine, .45 ACP, 5.7x28mm SS190, 5.56x45mm M193

The US .30 cal M1 Carbine is one of the most important developments in the personal defense weapon story, being one of the very first* intermediate calibers to be adopted as standard issue by a nation, and arguably the first purpose-designed PDW caliber in history. Even today it occupies a strange halfway point between pistol and rifle cartridges, being similar in design to a long pistol round or magnum revolver round with its straight-walled case and round-nosed bullet, but loaded with rifle powders designed for the 18″ barrel of the handy little M1 Carbine.

*I have mentioned before that it is in fact the Italians who claimed the prize of “first intermediate caliber to be adopted as standard issue”, with their long but still very much intermediate 7.35x51mm round.

The .30 Carbine is so weird in part because it’s descended from an innovative and influential but little-known family of rounds developed by Winchester in the early 1900s. These were the Winchester Self-Loading (WSL) rounds, including .32 WSL, .35 WSL, .351 WSL, and .401 WSL. Each round was a straight-walled, semi-rimmed cartridge firing a round-nosed bullet at modest pressure, just like the .30 Carbine. This design allowed the use of a simple blowback action, shared between the Winchester 1905, 1907, and 1910 rifles.

When Winchester was asked by Ordnance to develop a round for a new echelon weapon to complement the .45 cal 1911 handgun, their engineers fell back to the basic design of these rounds, adapting the .32 WSL into what was called in development the .30 SL, virtually identical to today’s .30 Carbine. The .30 SL was an entirely conservative design, which hastened development considerably. Even though Winchester developed a round suitable for straight blowback actions, the rifle they eventually submitted – designed by William Roemer and Fred Humeston, and based on the work done by convict David Marshall Williams – was a gas-operated, locked breech design. Still, the mild working characteristics of the .30 SL allowed the design of a very lightweight and simple gun, in a similar fashion to how the blowback-friendly .32 and .380 ACP rounds allowed the Kel-Tec P-32 and P3AT to be much smaller and lighter than their blowback counterparts.

Still, the .30 Carbine is a round that has taken considerable criticism for its lack of performance, so it’s worthwhile to take a look at exactly how it does in comparison to other rounds used for the same purpose:

Here we see pretty much exactly what we’d expect: A round that starts out quite admirably thanks to its good velocity and energy, but which tends to underperform at range due to its dumpy ballistic coefficient.

Weight-wise, the .30 Carbine is also a bit of a disappointment, clocking in at 12.70 grams per round of M2 .30 Carbine Ball ammunition, heavier than the far more capable 5.56×45.

Overall, the .30 Carbine is a round that is historically important, but not terribly ballistically relevant to the modern discussion of personal defense weapon ammunition. Any series covering this topic would be incomplete without a look at the round, however!



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He is also the author of the original web serial Heartblood, which is being updated and edited regularly. He can be reached via email at [email protected]


Advertisement

  • chris

    Is there a type of .30 with a bullet geometry closer to a rifle round in the US?

    • ostiariusalpha

      The M18 High Pressure Test cartridge had a spitzer tip.

      • Wouldn’t fit in a mag, though.

        • ostiariusalpha

          Well, you wouldn’t want to be shooting a magazine full of proof rounds in a stock M1C to start with, but that’s chris’ answer to his question.

          • You can’t tell me what I can and can’t do!!! 😉

          • ostiariusalpha

            On video or you’re yeller.

        • Jared Vynn

          Feels like that’s the biggest detractor for PDW cartridges, you have to either design a new magazine and firearm like the 5.7×28 has or design to fit existing firearms/magazines like the 22tcm was. Seems like the limit on cartridge design is nothing between about 1.3″ to about 2.2″ oal as there are no widely used semi auto magazine or firearms that can use those.

          • ostiariusalpha

            Definitely also appears to be the case that the less comfortably it can be fit into the magwell of a pistol grip, the less likely it is to be widely accepted over a “full size” intermediate cartridge.

          • Jared Vynn

            This is why I have high hopes for 22tcm, it can fit in most existing handgun magazines. Downside to 22tcm is you can’t use it in a blow back action as the momentum/bolt thrust requires too heavy a bolt to be feasible. On a Facebook fan page a guy in New Zealand ended up using a pistol length gas system on a 20″ barrel ar15 because he couldn’t get a 9mm blowback to work with 22tcm.

    • Closest thing would be a Mini-14 in .300 Blackout.

      • Jared Vynn

        Or an Ares SCR with a 300 blackout upper.

  • Uniform223

    Would love to own one for target plinking and home defense.

    • Sianmink

      If the stockpile of South Korean Garands and Carbines gets allowed back into the country, you should be able to get one in good condition, with very little collectors value, very cheap.

      • Jared Vynn

        Scuttlebutt is that the condition of this rifles isn’t the greatest. You can get an auto ordnance m1 carbine though, the newer ones sound to be of good quality.

        • Sianmink

          So long as the bore is good everything else can be dealt with.

      • valorius

        I’ve got my fingers crossed. I’ve wanted an M1 carbine for about 10 years now, but don’t want to pay collectors prices.

    • Jared Vynn

      300 blackout can cover that if you reload.

  • Troy Lund

    A good crossover would be .357 SIG with 90 grain bullets. You can get damn near rifle velocities out of a small (9mm projectile) pistol round (1850 + FPS).

    • JSmath

      Ya, but it’s a derivative of the .40, which many love to hate for no real reason. So, clearly inferior by means of imagination and ear plugging.

      • Troy Lund

        If you neck down a .40 it will be too short. You have to burn 10 mm Auto to make your own .357 SIG… So it is a bit more respectable.

    • marathag

      Why go for half measures?
      45 necked down to .38
      38-45 Clerke .38/45 Hard Head, etc. etc.

      • Troy Lund

        Let me know when Glock starts stamping those out.

        • marathag

          Glock?
          They thought 45 GAP was a good idea

          • Troy Lund

            Good point. The .380 never should have been bothered with either…

          • marathag

            380 has a real purpose, fill between 32ACP and 9mm
            GAP?
            Not so much.

          • Troy Lund

            9 mm should be the absolute minimum for any kind of non-paper work.

          • marathag

            A .25 in your pocket is better than a 9mm left at home. Some compact 9s aren’t so compact, while you can really carry a Baby Browning anywhere and not be noticed

          • roguetechie

            Smallest I’d realistically be willing to go is an original Remington model 51 or some unicorn new production colt hammerless that can magically take hotter modern 380 defensive ammo.

            Pocket pistols as a class seem to be something modern gun companies suck at.

          • RSG

            Except since the G43 released, the 42 was their best selling gun (civilian market), which over took the 19, fwiw.

      • roguetechie

        +1 I feel like so much less of a freak right now!

    • gunsandrockets

      .357 magnum from lever action carbines are pretty impressive too.

      • Troy Lund

        I just wish .357 Mag didn’t take up so much space (for no reason). Most of the casing is empty air. Put 6.6 gr of Unique in an empty casing and you realize their poor design. Same with ,38 Special.

        • gunsandrockets

          Is Unique a particularly fast burning powder? My reloading manual shows 7.6 grains Unique as a maximum loading for .357 magnum with a 158 grain bullet, and that isn’t a very fast load either.

          According to my reloading manual the highest velocity load for a .357 magnum rifle with a 158 grain bullet uses a maximum load of 14.5 grains of H110 powder. Not much wasted space then.

          • Troy Lund

            Unique is big and “flaky”. H110 is finer and more dense… You will still find the case less that 1/2 full even at 15 gr.

        • DrewN

          Well, it was a combo of older powders and making sure it was too long to fit in a .38. Not all decisions are ballistically driven.

  • Edeco

    Be neat if there were a large pistol, like Masterpiece Arms type, with the clip hole in the grip that would take a double-stack of 30 carbine.

    • Jared Vynn

      “Clip hole”, I think you meant magazine well. Brace yourself, pedantics are coming.

      • Twilight sparkle

        He’s been here awhile, I’m pretty sure he said “clip hole” in reference to the type of people that sometimes tend to buy MACs

        • Jared Vynn

          MAC 10 or Apple Mac? It seems I am out of the loop on that reference.

          • Twilight sparkle

            There’s also the big MAC and MAC and cheese. If you spend enough time in a gunstore hovering around a MAC 10 you’ll see a lot of less informed people drawn to that particular firearm.

          • Jared Vynn

            Any relation to the guys that hover around the Glocks and AK rifles?

            Clip holes seems a good way to describe them, like my new neighbor who thinks his SKS is a high power assault rifle.

          • JSmath

            But the SKS actually has a clip hole.

          • RSG

            All of this is covered on the MAC YouTube channel.

        • Edeco

          Facetiousely, yes, I think I got the phrase from James Reeves on here. Not a dig at MAC fanciers specifically tho; I guess they’re primitive, expensive toys, but they’re an important example of that form factor which I like.

          I should say, I’m not sure if 30 carbine could ever stack and feed well in a straight, 20+ round mag, and without competitive capacity a 30 MAC would be pretty pointless. The feedback on M1 mags gets bad over 20 even though they can curve, and there’s a bit of a rim.

          • James Reeves

            This is correct, ‘clip hole’ is proper nomenclature. ‘Bullet slit’ is also acceptable.

          • roguetechie

            Ammo stuffy point would be an acceptable substitute though right?

    • tiger

      AMT used make a pistol. The Automag III.

    • Swarf

      That’s half of a Stiches song right there.

  • Graham2

    I’ve loaded 110 Hornady V Max bullets in the M1 Carbine case and had very good accuracy with it and it shoots very well indeed out to 300 yards.

    It wasn’t in an M1 carbine though, it was a straighpull AR15 with a 1 in 10 twist barrel. It’s great fun to shoot on the range and foxes don’t like it when I’m at the farm! 300 BLK is obviously a better round but’s surprising how well the old cartridge shoots with modern bullets.

    • Jared Vynn

      Where did you get the rifle? What does it use for magazines?

      • Gragham2

        I’m in the UK and it’s a Southern Gun Company Speedmaster. I’m not sure if they are making them anymore and they were originally a lever action, where the AR pistol grip was pushed forward and an S-shaped lever pull the carrier back. They were a bit temperamental, so the previous owner had it removed and it is now cycled via a cocking lever fitted to the right hand side of the carrier, or an FAL style cocking handle on the left. With the 110 grain V Max bullets, drop at 200 yards is around 12″ and just over 40 inches at 300 yards.

        The magazines are machined from a solid alloy block/billet and have a double follower, so that they feed properly. I’d love to use standard AR mags, as I have dozens of them, but they are too narrow and the rounds get jumbled up and the feed lips are a tag too wide. It does however allow me to use longer bullets than standard and I’ve got some 135 Sierra Matchkings to try next, as well as loading 168 at 1,000 for use with a moderator/suppressor. There was a guy on Youtube called Matt Varga demonstrating a .30 carbine upper with his own style mag, but he didn’t put them into production unfortunately.

        • Anonymoose

          Olympic Arms used to make a .30 Carbine AR15 that was gas-operated. I guess they didn’t work that great and people just went back to their regular 9mm, .223, and 7.62×39 ARs. You may have had to permanently modify the lower receiver to get the magwell block in too.

  • Twilight sparkle

    I wonder if Israel is still keeping the 30 carbine on cpr, haven’t seen much about their m1 carbines or magal rifles pop up lately.

  • DrewN

    In the era of commonly used body armor, the .30 is certainly lacking. Against unarmored opponents at short to moderate ranges it’s more effective than it’s reputation would have you believe. I generally didn’t need to put more rounds on target than I did with M193.

    • valorius

      .30 carbine will cut through IIIA like a hot knife through butter.

      • DrewN

        Yeah, I wasn’t really thinking of IIIA and below. I was referring to it in a modern military context. It’s certainly still plenty stout for any kind of civilian use.

        • valorius

          Most 5.56mm and all but true AP 7.62mm wont penetrate a level III and above either though.

          M193 does, which is why they had to come out with level “III+” plates. M193 even out of a 16″ barrel M193 cuts through level III plates with ease, at least in the tests i’ve seen.
          M193 out of a 20″ AR barrel still even penetrates some of those though.

          It boggles the mind when one considers all the billions we spent on M4s and the development of M855A1 just to match a capability we already had for decades with the M16A2 and M193. Go figure.

          • Zachary marrs

            M193, just because it does good vs plates, doesn’t mean it’s the perfect choice.

          • valorius

            M193 is a hell of a lot of good thing in a 55 grain package. Especially given it’s price.

          • Zachary marrs

            There is better, much more reliable, and better performing ammunition on the market.

            It’s not 1995 anymore

          • jng1226

            So which rounds are you talking about then?

          • Zachary marrs

            M855a1, speer gold dot, mk262, mk318, barnes tsx…

            There are lots of them. We aren’t stuck with m855 and 193 anymore, just like we arent stuck with A2 uppers.

          • roguetechie

            For those of us who still rock 18 and 20 inch guns M193 works great…

            Also there’s that whole 2-6:1 ratio of rounds you can get for a given cash outlay directly affects how many rounds normal people can afford to fire in a month…

            Hell us M193 users can afford enough ammo to learn how to short stock if we really want to.

            TL:Dr your way of enjoying the hobby in no way makes it THE ONE TRUE WAY

          • Zachary marrs

            Never said it was the one true way.

            But that still doesn’t mean that you have the most effective option

          • roguetechie

            You made comments with definitive statements and, if I remember right, even called M193 etc obsolete etc…

            Aka, yes your word choices and sentence construction heavily implied even if you didn’t outright say it that doing it any other way was foolish if not outright wrong.

          • Zachary marrs

            Performance is performance.

            A car that goes 120 MPH is definitely faster than one that goes 80.

            That doesn’t mean that the 120 MPH car is the only car in the world worthy of owning.

          • Zachary marrs

            I can get 75gr gold dot for about .65 CPR, perhaps you can tell me where you are getting m193 for about 10 CPR?

            You need to check your prices, even if we go with mk262 blackhills at 1.07 CPR, you ain’t getting ANY 5.56/.223 below 20 CPR unless you are lucky and get a screaming deal

          • roguetechie

            Tbh, the last time I shopped for premium 5.56 like Mk 262 etc was pre November 8 2016, at which point the price differences were in the range I detailed.

            Even paying the prices you quote for M193 type ammunition versus 75 grain gold dot there’s still around a 2.66:1 ratio of 55 grain to gold dot 75 grain.

            Put another way what you’d spend to put 450 rounds of practice down range nets me 900 rounds of practice ammo AND another 300 round basic combat load to drop into deep storage!

            Assuming that you fire 450 rounds per month in practice sessions, you fire 9900 rounds per year perfecting your craft. We’ll call it 10,000 for the sake of easy math.

            In this same year I get to spend 19,800 practice shots perfecting MY craft, again rounded to 20,000 for easy math & round figures. I also get to put away 12 full 300 round combat loads which I put on strippers and DIY bandoleer pack in sealed containers with bulk dessicant in self assembled moisture traps.

            Since I’m not hooking and jabbing with the kids in the Sunni triangle and gathering up 7-12 of my closest friends in order to “stack” outside the front door of a house 3 blocks over and doing at least 2 dynamic entries per week…

            Nor have I found myself manning a vehicle check point where barrier blind ammunition to penetrate windshields and body panels could mean the difference between stopping the VBIED through the simple expedient of killing the driver and getting myself, my friends, and my neighbors blown apart ….

            I deem having twice the ammo to develop my skills and maintain proficiency PLUS pretty substantial surpluses I can pack away FAR more attractive than having a “fashionable” barrel length and kewl kid ammunition!

            (which incidentally has allowed me to keep up my standard practice schedule through multiple 6 month to 2 year “panics” without enriching the price gougers, reduction in practice firing schedule, or ever coming even CLOSE to breaching the sanctity of the emergency ammo stash!)

          • Zachary marrs

            Save it, your price ranges were way off.

            There’s nothing keeping you from using m193 for practice and buying the better performing stuff for actual social use.

            Do you plan on fighting the next world war all by yourself? If a few hundred rounds of gold dot breaks the bank, you need to look at your spending habits.

            Good ammo (like 262, 318, gold dot) is an investment. You wont be shooting it at the range every single day

          • valorius

            His price ranges are accurate.

          • Zachary marrs

            No they weren’t. Try reading next time

          • valorius

            M193 is about $.20 a round- so $.65 per round is still 300% more money.

          • Zachary marrs

            For steel case 55gr, sure.

            Not for brass cased m193.

          • valorius

            Brass cases M193 can be had for $.20 per round when it’s on sale, if you shop around. When i see it for that price i buy it in bulk.

          • valorius

            M855A1 is what, $2-3 a round for rejects, when you can get it?

            Mk262 is great, but it’s very expensive, and it won’t penetrate level III plate armor. It’s also over $1 a round.

            Mk318 is also very expensive, and again, won’t penetrate level III plate.

            Same for TSX. Expensive and won’t penetrate a level III plate unless you’re firing it out of a 24″ barrel.

            Gold dot is fine ammunition, but it’s more than 3x the price of M193, and again….forget penetrating level III armor. A 20″ AR firing M193 will even penetrate some level III+ plates, and M193 at close range from a 20″ barrel is absolutely devastating.

          • Zachary marrs

            Gold dot is around .60 CPR.

            Tell me where you are getting M193 at 20 CPR.

            m193 is not the best choice anymore, get over it

          • valorius

            Last time it was from Black Guns industries, i think. It was loose bagged milspec ammo. Bought it right before the election. Price was fantastic.

          • valorius

            Much more reliable? Much more reliable at what? Much better performing? Much? I’d go with marginally better performing, but certainly not much. And for sure as heck not for the price.
            At any rate, M193 is from the 1960s, not 1995.

          • Zachary marrs

            I said 1995 because that was over 20 years ago, and back in 1995 the only options you really had were m193 or m855.

            Here’s a tip, don’t assume people don’t know what they are talking about.

            As for reliability, do some research into the failure rate of M193. And yes, much. The only thing m193 has going for it is price, and its not like you can’t use it for practice while stocking better performing loads.

          • valorius

            M193 has a very small ‘failure’ rate, and particularly against very skinny individuals. The street criminals in my state are well fed.

            You say you know what you’re talking about, then say “the only thing M193 has going for is it’s price,” thereby proving you don’t.

            M193 is an outstanding overall load when all factors are considered.

          • Zachary marrs

            Small falure rate? 15% is not small.

            For often less than 30 CPR more, I can get a much smaller failure rate, that performs better out of shorter barrels and at/or longer range

            Its funny how you struggle to grasp the simple concept of putting aside some quality SD ammo.

            If you get some, its not like you are stuck shooting that specific round the rest of your life.

          • valorius

            I dont have an SBR, so it’s no concern of mine. The 15% figure includes engagements at ranges far beyond what i’ll ever be participating in as a civilian, and against skinny natives- which i will also not be facing.

            And I double tap as a matter of course. In the real world conditions i’ll be facing the failure rate of M193 is infinitesimal.

            And even when M193 doesnt fragment, it’s yawing still creates an extensive wound cavity.

            M193 is typically about $.20 a round. Any HP ammunition i’d be using in 5.56mm is $1.00 per shot or more, sometimes a lot more.- which is 500% or more expensive.

            That means i can practice 5x more for the same budget, which will make me far more effective when the chips are down.

            Finally, M193 will penetrate level III armor even from a 16″ barrel- expanding 5.56mm ammo will not.

            All things considered, M193 is almost impossible to beat.

          • Zachary marrs

            Holy sh-t dude, if you are THAT infatuated with M193, then buy it, nobody here is forcing you to use anything else.

            But facts are facts, performance can be measured and compared, and M193 isn’t as hot as it once was.

            Deal. With. It.

          • valorius

            Fact is that for the price, all things considered, M193 is overall nearly impossible to beat.

          • valorius

            All spitzers yaw. The only time M193 doesnt yaw in time is if you hit something like a wrist or skinny forearm or calf. And even in that case, the temporary wound cavity is far more extensive than any handgun round.

          • jng1226

            I thought that 55 grain out of longer than 16″ barrels is significantly more wounding than M855. I further thought that it wasn’t until Mk262 and then M855A1 that the terminal ballistics out of 14.5″ M4s caught up to the original 20″ M16 using M193-spec. Don’t SMUs use “brown tip” which is 70-grain Barnes TSX for their SBRs because it really does the job the best?

          • Zachary marrs

            And?

          • valorius

            You come across as kind of a jerk, in case you’re not aware.

          • Zachary marrs

            Thats cute

          • valorius

            Show me where i used the word perfect.

            Perfect is a star trek phaser.

          • Zachary marrs

            If you can stuff words in my mouth, i don’t see the issue with me doing the same

          • valorius

            Words are better than hand grenades.

      • RSG

        Really? So it defeats all soft side handgun armor? I didn’t know that. Makes sense with all that energy, though.

        • valorius

          Thanks for the sarcasm, i was running low.

  • valorius

    To me the first PDW was the artillery model Mauser C96 with shoulder stock.

    • ostiariusalpha

      The artillery were armed with Luger LP08 guns, not the C96. If that is what you were trying to refer to, then I’m inclined to agree with you. Though many might argue against that, since artillery could be quite rightfully considered a combat unit; seeing as they killed more people than anyone else in WWI, at least on the western front.

      • valorius

        I’m actually referring to the carbine model, which was also available commercially.

        I think it’s in that new game Battlefield 1 too.

        I think it predates the 10″ Luger shoulder stocked model by a few years, but i may be wrong.

        While artillery is obviously a combat arm, they’re typically indirect fire units far from the actual front- though obviously in WWI their range was much shorter so that was not always the case. I think artillery typically causes the overwhelming % of casualties in pretty much all modern wars.

        • ostiariusalpha

          It does pre-date the Lange Pistole by a decade, but it wasn’t intended (or even used) as a defensive arm for the rear echelon. The M1898 also lacks the magazine capacity to be an effective PDW; it wasn’t till the Schnellfeuer that a version of the C96 could adequately fulfill that role.

          • valorius

            A C96 carbine with 10 rd stripper clip is quite well suited as a rear echelon PDW, particularly once detachable mags were introducted (1930s i think?)

          • ostiariusalpha

            The detachable magazine was on the M712/1932 Schnellfeuer that I’ve already mentioned (not counting the earlier unlicensed versions made in Spain). Whether the 1898 would have made a decent PDW is really neither here nor there, the Germans never used it that way.

          • valorius

            Doesnt really matter how it was used, doesn’t change what it actually was, or had the potential to be.

  • valorius

    .30 carbine soft point is a very potent cartridge for self defense.

  • tiger

    Anybody know what became of Malcolm X’s .30 carbine? His photo got me to buy one as my go to house defense gun after the riots in LA. Strange Winchester never chambered it in a lever gun. With all the surplus ammo & tv westerns; it would have sold.

    • Kivaari

      Marlin made a lever action in .30 carbine and .256 Winchester.

      • gunsandrockets

        Was that the Levermatic?

        • Kivaari

          Yes.

      • valorius

        That would be a neat toy to own.

  • Swarf

    “with its straight-walled case”

    Straight-ish.

    • Unshoulderated.

    • FightFireJay

      Straighter than some of my gun owning friends (Pink Pistols members).

  • snmp

    Its would be intresting to have balistic graphic of the .30M1 vs german 7,92X33Kurz & Russian7,62x25TT & Russian 7,62X39M43

  • noob

    I want to know how brilliant designer, bootlegger, felon and convicted cop killer David Marshall Williams was allowed anywhere near a firearm, much less servicing the prison guards’ weapons. Were the rules about felons and firearms different back then?

    • The rules about bending rules were a bit different back then, I think.

    • RSG

      We had much worse people around our military arms facilities, and even bomb/rocket labs after WWII, fwiw.

    • No one

      Well, with the context of “The biggest conflict the world has ever seen is going on and we have a project this man may be perfect for”, It MAY be a good idea in that scenario to utilize those talents, despite his heinous past actions.

      • World War II hadn’t begun yet. Williams was released in 1927, and came on with Winchester in 1939.

  • gunsandrockets

    “Here we see pretty much exactly what we’d expect: A round that starts out quite admirably thanks to its good velocity and energy, but which tends to underperform at range due to its dumpy ballistic coefficient.”

    Oh I don’t know about that. The .30 carbine seems very efficient and practical for a PDW compared to 9mm and 5.56mm.

    The .30 carbine has as much penetration at 280 meters as the 9mm does at 80 meters. That is a significant increase in practical range for a PDW.

    And the 5.56mm M193 shows very little improvement in energy delivered at 300 yards compared to the .30 carbine, when fired from a short 10.5 inch barrel. But a 5.56mm does have tremendously obnoxious muzzle blast when fired from such a short barrel. I imagine tracer and incendiary rounds work much better with the larger .30 carbine bullet than the tiny M193 bullet as well.

    • valorius

      What .30 carbine chambered weapon has a 10″ barrel?

  • Rnasser Rnasser

    Just going for a bit hotter load for the .30 carbine, combined with a spitzer bullet, could have improved it’s performance. The spitzer bullet tumbles earlier, too.

  • scaatylobo

    One fact that I love about the M1 carbine.
    Even if your an 80 year old man or woman,you can shoot it well enough to make your life NOT worth taking.
    It is not “THE” perfect gun for too much,but for a frail or elderly person = BINGO !.
    And of course you should be using Hornady Critical Defense 110 FTX rounds.