Museum of the Great Patriotic War (Moscow)

The Museum of the Great Patriotic War in Moscow contains a large amount of information, vehicles and firearms from the time around 1941-1945.

It opened to the public in 1995 and is a museum and memorial for the World War II, in Russia known as “The Great Patriotic War”.

Overview of the museum.

The museum is about 20 000 square meters.

This thing below is huge! TMK-3-12, 305 mm. Used against Finland at the Mannerheim line.

According to WikiPedia:

Three railway guns were built, using guns from the sunken battleship Imperatritsa Mariya, which had been lost to a magazine explosion in Sevastopol harbor in October 1916. They were used in the Soviet-Finnish war in 1939-1940. In June–December 1941 they took part in the defense of the Soviet naval base on Finland’s Hanko peninsula. They were disabled by Soviet seamen when the base was evacuated, and were later restored by Finnish specialists using guns from the withdrawn Russian battleship Imperator Aleksandr III. After the war these were handed over to the Soviet Union, which maintained in operational condition until 1991. Withdrawn from service in 1999, they were the last battleship-caliber Obukhov pieces still operational in the world.

ТМ-1-180

Krasnovostochnik from 1917, an armed locomotive.

Berlin Reichstag in scale 1:1

Reconstruction of a bombed flat being used as a machine gun nest in Berlin.

Various German helmets and firearms.

Panzerfaust and jacket from Hitlerjugend.

7,62 mm Sudayev PPS from 1943.

Gewehr 41

 

Firearms used in Stalingrad. Shpagin-rifle, Mosin sniper and Simonov 14,5 mm anti-tank rifle.

Maxim from the Battle of Stalingrad.

“Surrender yourself!” – flag from Stalingrad, january 1943.

The Hall of Glory, a white marble room with names of over 11 800 recipients of the “Hero of the Soviet Union”.

The large bronze sculpture is called the “Soldier of Victory” stands in the center of this hall.

Museum shop

Many thanks to “M.F” for sharing the pictures.

 

You can find the museum’s homepage here.



Eric B

Ex-Arctic Ranger. Competitive practical shooter and hunter with an European focus. Always ready to increase my collection of modern semi-automatic firearms, optics and sound suppressors. Owning the night would be nice too.


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  • TheNotoriousIUD

    Sweet, this is a mini sub at the Nimitz https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/28fd616d4afe1e8106d6a5b36d74200ae4d8f60cf8b1f6425b9e67ab80d14abf.jpg National Museum of the Pacific War in Fredericksburg, TX.

    • Mr. Privilege

      Does this museum have a display to honor the blacks and gays? We need to keep them in mind at all times, you know. Hopefully this place has a section dedicated to blacks and gays, or else it might be racist.

      • int19h

        Note how you’re the only one talking about this subject out of the blue. Obsessed much?

        • Mr. Privilege

          I’m on board with Mr. Notorious here. We must continue to virtue signal to the blacks and gays and then they will all vote GOP. This plan has been working exceedingly well over the last 40 years. Why, just this last election, the GOP was able to score a whole 8% of the black vote – a banner year! If social justice advocates like myself and IUD continue to pander to blacks and gays, we might up that number to 9% by 2045!

        • Yes indeed no politics and things way off topic—–

      • Anonymoose

        We get that you’re really into black guys, but take a chill pill, sweetheart! https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/52d613dbb3bb8fccd972fb248827ef62b16d28cae08c42fc2a8b9bb00e2176d5.jpg mfw

        • Mr. Privilege

          I’m just trying to keep Mr. Notorious honest. We must virtue signal for the blacks and gays at all times – then they will all start to vote overwhelmingly conservative. We must be very inclusive just like the left and then those blacks and gays will all be voting GOP before you know it!

          • Anonymoose

            Years of discrimination from one side and handouts from the other are not going to be forgotten so easily.

          • Mr. Privilege

            I know, right? That’s why we have to continue to hold each others feet to the fire and virtue signal as hard as we possibly can – like just the other day when IUD accused me of “hating blacks and gays”. That’s why I make it a point to show up here routinely now in order to hold Mr. IUD to these very high standards which he holds so dear to his heart. We must make sure we are very inclusive to the blacks and gays and use a perceived lack of support for these groups to attack people on the right. It’s a very productive policy to adhere to.

          • He needs to stay on topic his comments along these lines are not welcome.

  • codfilet

    This is really somewhere I’d like to visit!

  • clampdown

    That is the most bad-ass gift shop ever. I really want to go to Russia and visit various WWII historic sites.

    • Anonymoose

      Get your kid a bunch of Lego sets and a toy SVD!

      • Iggy

        The finest LUGO sets available I imagine.

  • yodamiles

    What’s up with the name? Great Patriotic this and that? Same thing with North Korea and China, The People this and that, The Revolutionary this and that, Democratic this and that? It’s like they have to constantly reminded themselves or something.

    • TechnoTriticale

      re: What’s up with the name? Great Patriotic this and that?

      Apart from the fact that every official statement or document in the USSR was propaganda at some level, WWII was perhaps the only period during which the people and the Party were sort of on the same side.

      • B-Sabre

        It has to do with the Stalinist ethos, where everything is “Great”. Like the Great Leap Forward.

        • iksnilol

          But Great Leap Forward was Mao, that was China.

          • B-Sabre

            I got that, but both regimes were “Stalinist” in their nature, which included overblown rhetoric as demonstrated in the names they chose.

            The DPRK is the same way today, and is pretty much the last Stalinist state left.

          • iksnilol

            No, the DPRK is a Democratic Republic. It says so right in the name.

          • FulMetlJakit

            I recognize and appreciate your sarcasm, and raise you… truth!
            And the United States of America is a democracy… except it’s not, it’s a Constitutional Republic.
            (Honestly though… it’s an oligarchy, as is almost everywhere)

            True democracy is 8 wolves and 5 sheep, debating what’s for dinner.
            Freedom is giving the sheep guns.

          • gunsandrockets

            Don’t forget Cuba!

        • Al Wise

          You lose 40 million in one war, you’re allowed to use the word great. We use it too. Great depression for one.

      • Wolfgar

        Hmm let me see, Hitler”s bullets or Stalin’s bullets? I know, I will be a Patriot!

      • Al Wise

        Try reading a little history.

    • Anonymoose

      When you stop the fascists who invaded your country you too can be great and patriotic.

    • n0truscotsman

      Considering the Soviet people bore the brunt of the Axis powers during WW2, and fought their war not only against a foreign occupation, but for something so basic as the right to simply *live*, they can call it whatever they want as far as I’m concerned.

      • gunsandrockets

        Yes, the Soviets bore the brunt of the war. But for all practical purposes the Soviet Union was one of the Axis powers from 1939 until Germany invaded the Soviet Union in 1941.

        • Foma Klimov

          BS. We had a non-aggression pact (not the same as an alliance) with the Nazis to buy ourselves some time and only because Britain and France refused the offer to enter into an anti-Nazi Alliance earlier. We also kicked the Japanese’s ass in several major border engagements (see the Battle of Khalkhin Gol) during that time and had a major force stationed on Manchurian borders even some months after the Nazi Invasion. When our spy in Tokyo told Stalin that the Japanese were not planning an attack (were preparing for their Pacific venture instead),those reinforcements from Siberia helped turn the tide in the Battle of Moscow.

          • gunsandrockets

            Not only did the Soviets provide raw materials which Germany so desperately needed and lacked at the beginning of the war, the Soviets cooperated in offensive action such as against Poland.

            Soviet support is one reason why the naval blockade strategy the UK used so effectively against Germany in WWI had no hope for success in WWII.

        • n0truscotsman

          Im not interested in weighing the virtues of individual nations during the pre-WW2/GPW era. After all, if we delve into bad actor behavior, American business and banking interests *DID* bankroll the Nazis and eugenics and resettlement of native populations like what was proposed by “lebensraum” wasn’t a unique, Nazi idea.

          Likewise, the Nazis didn’t invent concentration camps either.

          • gunsandrockets

            I don’t think Poland, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania or Estonia think of 1939-1940 as the “pre-WW2” era.

          • n0truscotsman

            Pedantry.

  • Mr. Privilege

    Patton was right about these people. Back then, anyway.

  • PaulG

    Frankly the toy guns in the last pic really grabbed my attention.

  • David L. Willis

    I’ve got to explore the Monument to the Heroic Defenders of Leningrad and museum in St. Petersburg as well as a very intense, private military museum also in St. Petersburg back in 2009. Suffice it to say, they are serious about weaponry.

    • Roderick

      Ehm… I have once visited a very intense, private military museum too… Was yours exactly the way I think it is?

      • David L. Willis

        the one where you stand in silence, in a period accurate room, while listing to actual recording from the siege as they pump in that smoke that smells like sulfur, gunpowder and God knows what…I think we are thinking about the same one. Looks like a very nondescript..I don’t know…Russian version of a row-house? Big foyer, one bathroom and a very rotund woman in a uniform at the front giving everybody the stink eye…lol

  • Eggcelent
  • VanDiemensLand

    Ah! That’s interesting, thanks!

    • int19h

      While we’re at it, the translation “patriotic” is not actually particularly precise. The actual word is a single adjective that can only be vaguely translated as “pertaining to the Fatherland” or “of the Fatherland”. So really it’s more along the lines of “Great Fatherlandish War”. 🙂

      Furthermore, in Russian the whole “fatherland” shtick sounds quite a bit less epic than in English, because the same word/root is also used to describe many mundane things – e.g. where Americans say “domestic” in a sense of “American” (manufacturers, goods etc), Russians would use that word.

      • VanDiemensLand

        That doesn’t really roll off the tongue as easily haha

  • gunsandrockets

    1939-1940 not so Great not so Patriotic War…

    Fascinating museum. I noticed a Beretta 1938/44 SMG on display. That Socialist Realism styled “Soldier of Victory” looks like something from a Superman movie. Which kind of makes sense when you think of it. Superman and the “New Soviet man” both inspired from similar aspirations.

  • Wolfgar

    The gift shop looks like the toy store of my youth. The Imperil War museum and this one are now on my bucket list.

  • Diver6106

    The USSR paid such a terrible price to free the world from the Nazis… Soldiers and workers and just plain people. But then they killed so many of their own under Stalin’s orders and then never enjoyed the freedoms of most of the rest of the world. Someday when Putin’s gone they will be free. The price paid in WW II can NEVER be forgotten.

    • C

      “Price” they basicly started WW2 too, invasion of Poland.

      And yes youre right with Stalin.

      And jup Putin is an ex KGB agent, all opposition eighter get killed, poisoned, or sued in questionable court proceedings with faked evidence.

      Not even starting about the insanely agressive russian state financed propaganda in Europe, planned to reshape public and politic opinion. Which already created quite a lot ultra anti american and anti NATO thinking in some persons with a russian-übermensch mindset.

    • ArjunaKunti

      The Soviet Union was about to invade Eastern Europe when the Barbarossa plan started. The red soldiers made terrible things during the later “liberation” of Eastern Europe… I better like to see the Barbarossa plan as a common European venture against bolhevism to save Europe.

      • FulMetlJakit

        Union of Soviet Socialist Rapists…
        And survival rates of Soviet POW work camps was as bad as Nazi concentration camps.

  • Seth Hill

    Now, to invent a teleportation device so I can obtain the various firearms on display.

  • Tinkerer

    Son, let me introduce you to a concept called “sarcasm”.

  • Simon Grushka

    oh, i wonder how many souvenirs from Poland will be shown.
    you know- from the war from the Sept ’39 til ’41, when they, together with 3rd Reich, attacked it.

  • Diver6106

    Yes, Stalin was as bad as Hitler, but he still stopped the Nazis. I was talking with Polish WW II vets at the 60th anniversary of the Warsaw Uprising, and they were ABSOLUTELY DISAPPOINTED that they were not free after the war. But the western powers were spent, and could not take on the USSR in a continued war. The west settled on the policy of CONTAINMENT and a Cold War instead. THAT WORKED and Poland and eastern Europe is free today. Russia has stepped back from democracy, but that will certainly be seen as an aberration in world history.