New Rifle: Bergara B14 HMR

Bergara rifle

Bergara Rifles is rolling out a new bolt gun ahead of the SHOT Show. Called the B14 HMR, this new rifle is designed for precision shooting and comes with a sub MOA guarantee (with factory match ammo.) Bergara positions this new gun for “hardcore hunters, precision rifle shooters and those desiring absolute quality and accuracy.”

Bergara chassis

The gun is built on a mini chassis made of 7075 T6 aluminum and bedded in a molded synthetic stock. The gun uses the company’s B14 action of course.

Chambered in both .308 Win and 6.5 Creedmoor, the guns use AICS type magazines and ship with a single Magpul AICS PMAG to keep it fed. The .30-caliber guns have a 20″ barrel while the 6.5 Creedmoor gets a slightly longer 22″ barrel. Barrels are button rifled and made of 4140 steel. Barrels are threaded (5/8×24).

Bergara stock

Bergara uses an adjustable trigger in these rifles. The stocks are adjustable for cheek height and length of pull. According to the company, most of the adjustments are made by hand and do not require a tool.

Unloaded, these guns weigh about 9.2 pounds. The suggested retail price is $1,150 for either caliber. The B14 HMR is completely built in Spain and imported to the United States through the company’s Lawrenceville, Georgia based operation. Bergara Rifles built rifles forΒ a number of SWAT teams in the metro Atlanta area.





Richard Johnson

An advocate of gun proliferation zones, Richard is a long time shooter, former cop and internet entrepreneur. Among the many places he calls home is http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/.


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  • ExMachina1

    Assuming the reviews are as good as their other rifles, I will be getting one of these…

  • Boudreux

    I’ve been wanting to get into long range shooting and I was pretty set on the Tikka T3X CTR (yes, over Ruger Precision and the Savage BA). This seems ready to compete! Well done capitalism, well done.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      The CTR is awesome, love mine. But this does look nice. For a chassis gun the Ruger is really hard to beat right now, will be picking on of those up.

      • Boudreux

        Good to hear about the CTR! Have you considered adding a chassis to your CTR, or would prefer to keep it “pure” and get the Ruger PR? Or is it simply 2 guns > 1 ? (universal truth, i get it)

        • JumpIf NotZero

          Yes. I did consider adding a chassis for my CTR. Problem is for the money, it’s not as cost effective as the Ruger, and you don’t get the mag compatibility, or the AR style safety, or the ability to swap barrels easily.

          If the Ruger didn’t shoot, that would be something, but they seem to.

          I love the Tikka, and for the money I think it’s the best value if you don’t want a chassis. But mag price is flat out stupid.

          • Boudreux

            Great points; thank you for sharing!

        • Shaun Connery Oliver II

          What do you think of Beretta and their limited edition precision rifle?(Well Tikka specifically)

      • Shaun Connery Oliver II

        Sorry about the last time concerning the 6.5 Creedmoor and to say you got a point. I look at the ballistics and see that the Creedmoor(both the 6mm and the 6.5) have outstanding accuracy at 1500 yards and beyond! It is rare for some to swallow their pride, but I wanted to say that I apologize.

        • JumpIf NotZero

          πŸ™‚ no sweat. Good on you

        • iksnilol

          Pfft, that creedmoor thingamajig is just an American fad copy of the 6.5×55 that wears out barrels faster.

          • Dougscamo

            The less popular .260 Remington is the American version….less barrel wear….

          • iksnilol

            Now hold on up, pardner.

            What is the 6.5 creedmoor then? IS IT NOT AMERICAN?I am simply shocked :O

            But yeah, .260 remington is good. You can make brass from .308 IIRC.

          • Dougscamo

            Just sayin’ that the .260 is closer to the 6.5 Swede….and it was developed for bolt actions originally….

  • Swarf

    I’m not familiar with the brand, but I am positive I have announced them while face first in the toilet the morning after some parties in my younger days.

    • iksnilol

      Think Remington 700 manufactured correctly. They’re gaining a bit of traction in Norway as good budget rifles.

  • Heartbreaker

    Add 4 inches to that Creedmoor barrel and I would be interested. Looks great.

  • Harry’s Holsters

    Is the MSRP correct?

    If so glad I didn’t buy a 6.5 Creedmoor savage.

    • Marcus D.

      The Savage BA is about $50 more msrp, can be found for under $1K, and is built on an all aluminum chassis with a blue printed action. Plus it has a longer barrel. And it is made in America, afaik, if that matters to you. Not as purty though.

      • iksnilol

        “blue printed” = we actually tightened the tolerances when building it

        Longer barrel that you’ll only hack away and an aluminium chassis that the Bergara has as well.

        “Made in America … bla bla bla…”, that’s not how capitalism works, if somebody makes something that does the same then they most likely will get the sales. I like Savage but I ain’t now protecting one company over another simply because they are made in the US. In the end a mentality like that will just make American manufacturers lazier.

        • TankGuy

          You’ve got to do your research with the Creedmoor! Hell, I was given one and I learned a lot in just a few minutes. The optimum barrel length for the best bullet weights and rifling is a 1/10 24″ barrel. They are AWESOME out past 1000 yards (yes, you read that correctly!!), recoil is negligible, and noise is way less than a .308. I haven’t found any negatives with this chambering, other than the fact that reloading dies for it are expensive! As is brass and bullets, but hey- there are worse things in life. Like getting hit with a 140 grain bullet, that was fired from 1500 yards away. By a range hobbyist with a vengeance complex where parking places are concerned. Maybe your surging relatives will think twice about using that handicapped space next time. LoL, but seriously- absolutely love the 6.5 Creedmoor!!

          • iksnilol

            You really missed my point. That form of performance has been had in Scandinavia for over a 100 years. To me, touting the virtues of a cartridge like that is like saying “HEY, Y’ALL SHOULD TRY THESE MOTORIZED WAGONS, THEY’RE REALLY GREAT FOR GETTING AROUND!”

            6.5x55mm does basically the same thing, only outta a long action but also less throat wear. And much cheaper (granted, that’s because it is in the holy trinity of cartridges in Scandinavia, so that doesn’t apply as much to y’all over the pond).

          • Dougscamo

            Our holy trinity starts with “.30″….but the 6.5 is more efficient for sure….tried to find a 6.5 X 55 for my son when he started hunting 25 years ago….none to be found other than surplus and dang few of those….

          • iksnilol

            In Norway they’re common, the holy trinity of hunting calibers is 6.5×55, 30-06 and .308. When I get my hunting license I will get a switch barrel mauser with barrels for all three. Simply because reloading 6.5×55 is fantastic, but 30-06 brass is free everywhere.

          • Dougscamo

            Just add 300 magnum (your choice of which) and you have our trinity…
            Curious….no hunting license?….whadya waitin’ for?….

          • iksnilol

            Am busy in school, to get a hunting license you need to pass a 40 question test, and you can only have like 7 wrong answers. Thinking about gettin’ ‘er done in summer or something.

            There’s also a shooting portion but that one I can do in my sleep (40-50 shots in a row on vitals on a animal target IIRC) πŸ˜›

          • Dougscamo

            Am I correct in my memory that part of the shooting portion includes a moving moose target?….

          • iksnilol

            Nah, that sucker is stationary.

            I found it on the wikipedia: 30 shots on a target over two days (maximum 15 a day), the results don’t matter here. Then 5 shots on an animal figure where all the shots must go into a 30 cm circle, the distance must be at least 100 meters. Also, no bags or bipods allowed (obviously).

            So yeah, the shooting portion is easy peasy.

          • jonp

            I distinctly remember several videos of guys going moose hunting in Norway/Sweden and part of the qualification was a moving moose target. Was that a requirement or just for show?

          • Dougscamo

            Don’t know….that is what I was asking….apparently not in Iksnilol’s part of Scandinavia…..

          • iksnilol

            You can shoot the qualification at a moving target, then you only need 3 out of 5 hits standing, but 5 out of 5 lying and crouching.

            You can do it on a moving target if you go to a range with that facility, but its a lot harder so I see no point in doing so.

          • jonp

            6.5×55 is a fantastic cartridge and will do everything you need in NA outside of Alaska where you should be carrying something bigger than the 30-06 anyways. If the 6.5 can’t get it done for you, you need more range time to further hone your bullet placement

          • Dougscamo

            Not doubting the cartridge….just try to find a 6.5 X 55 in a production rifle in the USA without doing a special order….

          • maodeedee

            Ballistically with factory ammo the 6.5 Swede is nearly identical to the 6.5 creedmoor. Both launch a 140 grain bullet at 26-2700 fps and a game animal would never know the difference between one cartridge and the other. Winchester loads the 6.5 swede to 2550 and Federal to 2650 and Hornady loads the 6.5 creedmoor to 2700 fps all with 140 grain bullets.

            The 6.5 Swede has greater case capacity so If you had a rifle with a strong action and a custom barrel you could load it to 270 Winchester velocities with 130 grain bullets. But the problem is that hardly any rifles are chambered in 6.5 Swede but there are more rifles available in the 6.5 credmoor all the time

          • iksnilol

            CZ 550 comes factory in 6.5×55 amongst others. And most 30-06 rifles can be converted to 6.5 with a simple barrel change and opened up bolt face/new bolt.

          • Dougscamo

            Yes it does….but not in a USA production rifle….though they have tried….Ruger most recently as I recall….
            Through 2 different gun search engines I found 5….in the US….
            AND if I’m hunting in the West and the airline loses my bags….try walking into a Walmart to try to find ammo for it on the shelf….in the middle of Wyoming or Idaho…just not a common round regardless of how good it is…

          • iksnilol

            Something like that, thus I done reckon Creedmoor is the better choice in the US. In Scandinavia 6.5 was popular for a long time, so its got that inertia keeping it common…and if it is common it gets used, its a good cycle.

          • maodeedee

            The 6.5 Creedmoor is as close to the 6.5 Swede as you’re going to get. They both launch a 140 grain bullet a around 2600 fps and the only real difference is the name on the cartridge box and the fact that more rifles are available today in 6.5 Creedmoor than were ever made in 6.5 Swede caliber.

            The 6.5-284 is another great cartridge if anyone want’s to “Supersize” their 6.5.

          • Dougscamo

            Yeah….I know….

          • Deplorable-Shocked&Amazed

            Yeah, yeah, yeah, everything is better in Norway

          • Shankbone

            “That’s not how capitalism works.”

          • iksnilol

            The whole point of an invisible hand is that it is free to act on its “own” accord (in quotes due to the hand merely being a metaphor). Artificially restricting the market via isolation or prohibition goes against the very concept of capitalism, which is a free market… emphasis on “free”.

          • Dougscamo

            I’M IMPRESSED….and I majored in economics in college (lotta good that did me in my LE career, lol)….as I’ve said before “you sly…yet succinct”…. πŸ™‚

          • iksnilol

            Mighty obliged πŸ™‚

            I may be a jerk half the time and not serious the other half, but I do come with a gem on occasion. So thanks.

        • jonp

          why would you hack away a barrel of a long range target/precision hunting rifle?

          • iksnilol

            Cause 66 cm is too much to lug around with a 10 cm suppressor.

            56 cm does the same job just as well. With better precision to boot due to a stiffer barrel.

          • jonp

            That makes sense. I don’t use a suppressor so it never comes to mind

          • maodeedee

            But longer barrels produce more velocity. When you cut a barrel from 24 inches to 20 you can lose as much as 200 fps.

            Greater velocity means less wind drift, less bullet drop, less time in flight, and greater range before the projectile becomes subsonic.

          • iksnilol

            Meh, nothing that the right load won’t fix. Besides, I am not an extreme long range shooter.

        • Robert W Bradford

          WRONG about both the blueprinting & barrel length.
          Also- the last comment on “mentality” is the stupidest thing Ive ever read.

          • iksnilol

            Well, blueprinting means as defined to ” to build it to exact design specs, limits and tolerances created by its oem engineers or other users”. So yeah, blueprinting is a fancy way of saying they followed the blueprints of the object in question.

            Regarding barrel length, there’s little practical difference in a 56 cm and 66 cm barrel. Unless you’re really that desperate for the last percentage of theoretical performance, which is a moot point, since then you’d done gone with a 76 cm barrel.

            Regarding “mentality”, how is it stupid? If you don’t have any foreign competition then you really don’t have to worry about quality nor price point to the same extent. I mean, what’s gonna happen? You getting undercut by foreigners? Or goodness forbid imports with better quality? No… no that won’t happen. So yeah, not rocket science.

      • Harry’s Holsters

        It does matter but this thing is just so sexy for the price! I just don’t like the look of the the BA. I was looking at a 10 FCP SR with the 24inch barrel and was thinking about building up the check rest but a budget rifle. The Bergara stock just looks insane!

  • This is very interesting. Bergara makes outstanding rifles. I like the chassis system, the adjustable stock, detachable magazine, and caliber selection. At that price this is going to be a very competitive rifle.

  • Swarf

    Jokes aside, that does seem like a hell of a deal, if it’s as good as it claims to be.

  • Ed Forney

    Bought a so-called “Competion” barrel for my AR (Wilson Combat is listed in the pictures on this page). Two inch groups are the best I can get with hand loaded match ammo. Very disappointed !

    • Klaus Von Schmitto

      Something is very wrong with that gun or you just got unlucky a got a bad barrel. I’ve got a Bergara barrel on a Win 70 in 25-06 and it will shoot 2 inch groups at 400 yards. Maybe it’s just their AR barrels.

      • Ed Forney

        This is the comment I received from Wilson Combat; Funny, their add for this barrel didn’t say this !
        ———

        “The lightweight do tend to have a slightly larger group at 100 yards as they have more flex than a standard recon tactical barrel will. I think this is why you are seeing the accuracy you currently have. Thank You”

        • jonp

          What is wrong with that statement from them? Stiffer barrels do tend to have better accuracy over thinner profile barrels

          • Ed Forney

            A barrel advertised as a competition barrel, should be just that !

          • iksnilol

            Well, what kinda competition, pardner?

            The ones where you shoot fast at big targets or the ones where you shoot slow at small targets?

          • Ed Forney

            I shoot at those targets 100 yds away, and expect all those holes to be in a one inch group

          • Dougscamo

            For the price that I suspect you paid for that barrel, I would be ticked off too….had a match stainless steel barrel on my first AR and it would do dime sized groups…on an average day….

          • Ed Forney

            Just ordered a better one. Tactical Recon 18″. Hope this one does better. At least the reviews say it does.

  • Smedley54

    My first thought from the model name was “Well, a rimfire from Bergara sounds interesting”, but then to discover it’s a centerfire was even better! But crap – really, another Creedmoor?

  • mark

    Hrmm let’s see.
    Nice chassis system.
    Adjustable stock.
    Detachable mag that isn’t proprietary and $$$$.
    Downright reasonable MSRP.

    There is a lot to like here.

  • Deplorable-Shocked&Amazed

    Looks nice

  • zipper

    While I’m not knocking the 6.5 Creed, isn’t it just the current “flavor of the month,” as iksnilol
    alluded too? Hundreds, actually Thousands(!), of cartridges over the years with very few offering any radical advantage over what already exists.
    Don’t forget, the firearms industry needs to drive sales, and what better way to do that than to introduce a new, whiz-bang cartridge. Get the marketing dept. along with a few friendly gun writers to whip-up excitement, and there you have it.
    As an aside, you guys might want to take a look at the 6mm Turbo 40. How does a 10-shot, one-hole group @ 600yds. sound? It also works from an AR platform.

    • maodeedee

      The 6.5 Creedmoor is a well-designed cartridge. It’s made so that bullets can be seated further out of the case and not protrude into the powder space and it has a long enough neck to better align the projectile.

      These small details make the difference at longer ranges and the reason the cartridge is so popular is because it’s accurate and not because it’s just the latest “fad”. There are 6mm cartridges that are similar in design and there is even a 6mm Creedmoor. But the 6.5 is a better hunting cartridge with 130-140 grain bullets. Ballistically the 6.5 Creedmoor is similar to the 6.5 swede and is not far behind the 270 Winchester.

      As far as the 6mm Turbo 40, It’s based on the 6.5 Grendel case and will work on an AR platform with a magazine that’s made to feed the 6.5 Grendel but there again the 6.5 is a better combination hunting/target cartridge than a 6mm, especially a 6mm with less case capacity than a 243.

      • zipper

        You said yourself(as did iksnilol) that the Swede is similar in performance. THAT was my point, which you missed. My opening sentence was that I wasn’t knocking the 6.5CM, right?
        Cartridges come and cartridges go. Some people jump on any new and “improved” thing that comes along, only to discover that it’s not much better(if at all) than a tried-and-true cartridge; again, my point.
        The 6.5CM wasn’t developed as a hunting cartridge, so that’s outside of this discussion.
        But, in that regard, there’s no reason to dump the terrific .270Win to pick-up a new 6.5CM.

        Once again, you missed the point and went off-base to support the 6.5CM when you said the 6.5 is better than a 6 for hunting. That’s a generic statement with too many variables to make a lot of sense. You should know better. The BIG point I made for the 6mm Turbo 40, and one which you acknowledged, but seemed to miss the Huge significance of, is that it works in the AR-15 platform.

        Bottom-line: Lots and lots of choices out there(too many!) for different uses. Go with what you feel is right for you.

        PS – Once upon a time ago, the .222 Rem was the reigning champ in target work.; eclipsed by the 6mm PPC. Does that mean the Deuce is no good today? Hardly. Could also cite the .30-30 Win, but that’s a horse of a different color.

    • Mike N.

      Of all the 6.5s out there, the Creedmoor has had the most market acceptance, and this is coming from someone who has a 6.5x47L and had a .260 Rem. If you don’t need energy on target, it’s a great long range round. You can get pretty decent factory ammo from a variety of manufacturers, Lapua brass is coming, and you can seat a 140 grain bullet out long enough to maximize powder capacity and still fit in an AICS magainze. What’s not to like?

      Sure the Swede came first but not only is it a long action cartridge, but factory loads are loaded light for old rifles (handloads can reach 6.5×284 speeds), and the base of the case is actually slightly larger than the 0.473″ standard.

      I think the Creedmoor is here to stay.

      • zipper

        Time will tell.