Crux Ordnance Muzzle Brake Review

crx ord 042

Crux Ordnance has recently released their first and only muzzle brake. Referred to as the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake, it is advertised as being the “most advanced muzzle brake on the market”. Patrick R. recently published an article introducing the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake to the TFB community. This article will follow up with a more in depth review.

Crux Ordnance is a CNC shop based out of Tinley Park, Illinois. They make a variety of high quality firearm accessories, all of which they manufacture in house. Some of their products include back plates and base plates for Glock pistols, guide rods, mag releases, muzzle brakes, and thread protectors. In addition, Crux Ordnance will soon be offering a variety of pins.

The CruxOrd Muzzle Brake is said to have “the first ever double helix baffles that redirect firing gases axially countering recoil and muzzle climb,” and “full length bleed lanes intersect each baffle to ensure proper cooling and gas volume control.” Each brake is also precision machined, hand finished, and comes with ½ x 28 threads. In addition, the CruxOrd brake is rated for .22 rimfire and high pressure 5.56. They come in black and are not suppressor adaptable. Furthermore, the brake itself is 2 inches long and 1 inch wide, and mine weighed in at 3.64 ounces. And finally, the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake retails for $139.95.

 

Right out of the package.

Right out of the package.

 

A close up of the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake

A close up of the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake

 

Installing the Crux Ord Muzzle Brake could not have been easier. First, I used the inexpensive  Ar-15 Combo Tool by Wheeler Engineering to unscrew the A2 flash hider (2.14 ounces). Then I threaded and tightened the brake by hand as far as I could take it. Lastly, I used an adjustable wrench to tighten the brake until it was level. Another neat feature is Crux Ordnance brake comes with flat top and bottom surfaces which make it easy to tighten up. I advise using cloth between the brake and the wrench to preserve the brake’s hand finish. However, it is worth noting that I did not use cloth during installation and the finish was unmarred.

Installation was a breeze.

Installation was a breeze.

 

Illuminating the vents.

Illuminating the vents.

 

A close up from the front.

A close up from the front.

 

Up next I headed out to the desert to look for any point of impact shift or any changes in accuracy with my 50 yard zero. Fortunately, there were no noticeable changes in point of impact or in accuracy after the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake was installed. Grouping remained around 2-2.5 MOA, which is par for the course for a Colt LE6920 rifle shooting PMC 55 gr. FMJ ammo.

Accuracy testing with the brake installed.

Accuracy testing with the brake installed.

 

Out in the wild.

Out in the wild.

 

It was time to have some fun with the brake once accuracy testing was completed. I did several Jeff Cooper style El Presidente drills to get a feel for the recoil reduction benefits of the CruxOrd Brake. I also did several 10 round strings of fire as fast and controlled as I could pull the trigger. The reduced recoil with the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake was obvious, having done these same drills with the A2 Birdcage previously. I was able to shave about .64 seconds off my time on the ‘El Pres’ drill with the brake installed. Some may not call that much, but it may be the difference in a competition, hunting, or defensive application.

The significant reduction in recoil allows a shooter with solid technique to experience virtually no muzzle climb. Also, shooters with a less intensive bracing stance will also benefit greatly from the reduced buck of the rifle. One noteworthy feature is the unique angled design of the baffles, which minimizes the increased concussive blast felt by those standing to the sides of traditional muzzle brakes.

The propellant gases are quite visible in this frame.

The propellant gases are quite visible in this frame.

 

On another note, the CruxOrd Muzzle brake was rumored to have some flash suppressive quality. My experience showed that it does generate a small flash relative to an unmodified muzzle. For further reference I compared it to a friend’s Arsenal chambered in 5.45 x 39. The CruxOrd Brake generated slightly less flash than the Arsenal’s brake. The flash was small and controlled enough that it was not blinding during low light shooting.

Low light shooting.

Low light shooting.

 

Even lower light shooting.

Even lower light shooting.

 

Shooting with the Arsenal for reference.

Arsenal fireball.

Overall, I was very pleased with the performance of the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake. It is a very well designed, machined, and finished product. Whether or not it is worth the MSRP will be something that each reader will have to personally decide. However, given the complexity of the double-helix system and the quality of the machining and hand finish, the CruxOrd Muzzle Brake is reasonably priced.

If you are a competitor, hunter, or recreational shooter whose success depends on rapid follow-up shots, then you should consider the muzzle brake by Crux Ordnance. It could be the finest .223 muzzle brake on the market today.

The Crux Ord Muzzle Brake

The Crux Ord Muzzle Brake



Michael G

Michael Gomez resides in the tri-border city of El Paso, Texas. He graduated Cum Laude with a BBA in Economics from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. With experience in firearms retail, he is currently an AR-15 armorer, pistol instructor, TFB writer, mule deer hunter, and pomegranate farmer.


Advertisement

  • Brian

    Looks like a seekins atc to me

    • Jim

      Exactly like the Seekins ATC.

  • Graham2

    Thank god there’s finally such a thing as an AR15 muzzle brake available- I was struggling to find an alternative to an A2 flash hider. If only more companies made items like this!

    • JustAHologram

      It’s recoil is so strong I wonder why shoulder injuries aren’t more common

      • Toxie

        I think we’ve jumped three or four sharks at this point….

        • CrankyFool

          I think you mean you jumped three or four snarks.

      • Charles Applegate

        I still have PTSD from shooting one.

    • Frank Grimes

      Shooting 5.56 without a comp is dangerous because the recoil is more than any human can handle.

      How do you think Stephen Hawking ended up like he did?

      • Brett

        I thought it was he tried to screw a robot?

  • jtx

    Get a suppressor, no worries about flash hiding or loud noises. Seems like everyone their grandma and their grandmas dog is making the latest greatest thing for ar 15 platform unfortunately there is nothing new under the sun

  • Sua Sponte

    I wonder how this compares to the Precision Armament’s M4-72 Severe-Duty Compensator ($89.99), with average 74% reduction of the recoil. It seems to take quite a few top of the list reviews…Another area though, to each his own, if it works for you and you like it, good on you..

  • Christopher Wallace

    $140 for a muzzle brake…. LULZ

  • Derrick Delgado

    I thought that place looked familiar! Lots of pew pew in EP

  • Mrninjatoes

    Hell yeah. You made a muzzle brake review fun to read. You going to leave that brake on, or go back to your A2?

    • Michael.g

      On that particular rifle I am going to go back to the A2. The reason is I am building a new competition/sport themed AR with which I will use a muzzle brake or a suppressor. I will relegate that Colt to be my ‘defensive’ AR, and in that role I think a flash hider is more appropriate.

  • Bill

    “I was able to shave about .64 seconds off my time on the ‘El Pres’ drill with the brake installed. Some may not call that much…”

    If your time was 4 seconds, that’s a lot. If it was 14, not so much.

    • Michael.g

      Actual number was right around 7-8 seconds. That may not be operator enough for TFB standards, but the way I figure, its all relative anyway. For instance if you run into a pack of Javelina or wild boar you may engage 20 targets or more, so even a small gain in one “El Pres” drill could add up to a significant effect over time. The same would apply to a 3-gun course for instance. I would say the main advantage of this brake over others however, is the reduction in blast to the sides.

  • Dude

    I had a hard time reading anything when I saw that Uncle Mike’s “holster.”

    • Michael.g

      Its actually a GunMate, which for $10 does a perfect job of keeping a pistol on my hip in case I stumble upon a rattlesnake (which I would deep fry like calamari and it would be delicious).

  • Ham_sangwich

    What’s the optic and do you like it?