Finally! An AK Receiver Optic Rail – No Welds Required

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As is common here in the US for our military service rifle, the AR tends to get all the love when it comes to removable optics rails for the “old” style receivers. With easily replaced handguards, various carry handle mounts, and eventually the “A3” upper receiver which has come to the standard for uppers, the AR has a lot of options for mounting optics.

The AK? Not so much. Its basic design never accounted for the mounting of optics and many would argue that the design itself is not conducive to their usage. The removable dust cover simply cannot hold zero reliably. As such, the Soviet Bloc adapted through the use of a welded side rail on the side of the weapons. But what about those weapons that did not come with the rail welded? Previously, they were “SOL.”

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Not anymore. A company dubbed Premier Shooting Solutions has invented an a weld-free rail mount for AK’s called the AK Master Mount. Using the hammer and trigger pin holes, the rail is screwed tightly into the receiver. The Master Mount is compatible with most stamped and milled receiver sets. Specifically, compatibility is detailed:

This “no-mod” side rail is the perfect accessory for “early” AKs such as the MAK 90 and other Chinese models; Arsenal TM SA 93 and SLR 95. It also fits Century TM C39; Yugoslavian PAPs; AMD-63; Egyptian Maadi, M85, home builds and all milled and stamped AKs that utilize standard hammer and trigger axis pins.

The AK Master Mount is compatible with existing AK receiver optics mounts. Various options are pictured including combloc surplus, modern scope rings, and various picatinny adapters for low-profile sighting solutions.

Those interested in learning more can check our the AK Master Mount on Premier’s website. Pricing is set at $86 with $5.00 shipping per unit total. a9ba3e0b34449d6ebf42bc4a9efcc77c



Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • Riot

    This is written like the side mount is a recent thing. They’ve been knocking about since the fifties.

    • Yeah, it’s the “no weld” bit that makes it interesting. Wouldn’t have minded the option for my AMD-65 back in the day.

      • 11b

        Anyone can drill and tap a side mount optics rail. Center punch, hand drill, and harbor freight tap. No welding 😀

        • codfilet

          non-original holes in a firearm lower its value sharply.

          • Phillip Cooper

            Who buys an AK as an investment?

          • codfilet

            What did a Polytech sidefolder cost then, as opposed to now?

        • Beardedrambler

          Seems threads would have a hard time holding well in 1mm of sheet metal

          • Slimsummers

            Yes they would. Which is why the mount itself is threaded and the screws are installed with the heads inside the receiver and the threaded portion passing through the holes and into the mount.

      • iksnilol

        You weld the siderail on?

  • Rob

    All side rails are weld free. Although this may very well be the first that is rivet free.

    • Twilight sparkle
    • A friend said the same thing, but I note the article says,

      As such, the Soviet Bloc adapted through the use of a welded side rail on the side of the weapons. But what about those weapons that did not come with the rail welded? Previously, they were “SOL.”

      _Soviet_bloc_. I’ve seen LOTS of examples of people drilling/tapping holes for a side rain for mounting, but I’ve never even seen a side rail on a soviet-era AK… I’d like to find a citation that either supports or refutes this. Help, anyone?

  • Ken

    Good alternative to a gas tube or handguard rail on a non-side rail gun. It also lets you place the optic a bit lower than a gas tube or handguard mount.

  • BrandonAKsALot

    I’ve seen riveted and screwed on side-rails, but have yet to see welded.

  • rs

    I’ve been using these for a few months. Love ’em.

    They work, they’re easy to install, and, unlike the UTG product, they’re an actual useful, full length, rail (the UTG has no stop to prevent the scope from coming off the front of the mount).

    The only hitch – and it’s really minor – is that on some guns, if you torque the hammer pin-screw really hard, you can bend in the side of the receiver and lock up the hammer. You can either torque the screw a touch less and use some loctite (which you should use anyway) or grind the pin area of the hammer a few thousandths for clearance.

    • Premier Shooting Solutions LLC

      This is not a problem with over torque, but with the brand of hammer in the AK. It appears that some manufactures have variability in the angle of the taper on the side of the hammer and could bind some with the second collar on my hammer pin; therefore, I have deleted this second pin collar from my current production run in order to make this side rail even more “universal.”

      James
      Premier Shooting Solutions LLC

      • rs

        TY for letting me know.

  • gunsandrockets
  • Gunner4guy

    Like to see something like this for an SKS as the top cover isn’t any sturdier than an AK top cover.

  • disqus_PDmXLtTxJj

    If I had the choice between devaluing a classic firearm for a scope mount or just buying a new Ak pattern rifle with a scope mount I’d just buy the new rifle.

  • KiwiShooter

    Just what I need for my Norinco 56S, do they export?

  • Frank Grimes

    Stupid design.