Springfield Armory’s SAINT Is Revealed! | Part 1 of 3 Event Coverage

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After weeks of advertisements, videos, and other vague references to the Springfield Armory SAINT the anticipation has to be killing you, or at the very least driving you a bit crazy. After I threw up my hastily written sneak peek, some of the theories I saw in the comments went anywhere from the downright ludicrous to spot on.

As you can imagine, the media embargo has been killing me. After all, the time I spent with the Springfield crew was two of the most amazing days I have been able to enjoy as a shooter. It is going to be hard as hell for anyone to come close to the level of high energy awesome that Chad, Denny, and the rest of the team were able to pack in there.

So, what does the SAINT mean for shooters? Frankly, it means another AR-15 to choose from on the rack at your local gun store. The catch is, it is going to be easy to overlook the greatness they built into the rifle. In over a decade of shooting the AR-15/M-16 platform almost exclusively, I have never come across a rifle that offers this level of performance for around $850 MSRP.

IMG_4461So what could be so special about an $899 AR-15? A catchy name? That wouldn’t be enough to impress me. Before we get too far into it, I want to note that Springfield pulled out all the stops and had some solid accessories laid out with our rifles ready to be installed to our liking.

  • Two Springfield Armory SAINT AR-15s
  • Trijicon MRO
  • Warne Tactical X-Skel Mount
  • Surefire M600
  • Bushnell Elite Tactical 1-6.5×24 scope
  • Blue Force Gear Vickers Sling

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Before I stopped to take photos, I tore into the boxes in front of me and mounted everything to my two rifles as I preferred. Some of the trainers that Springfield brought out for the event glanced at my rifle and after determining that I am right handed, rolled their eyes at my setup (talkin’ about you Bryan). Once I finished, I started snapping pictures furiously with my cell phone since I am not sure if the rifle will be shipped out in time for me to take better photos.

So what does $899 buy you in Springfield Armory AR-15? A lot more than meets the eye. I snapped a photo of the scoped rifle so you can see the whole package. The Bravo Company furniture was a great choice; I found the stock and grip to be exceptional. Springfield also worked with BCM to bring a new polymer keymod handguard to market that I have some mixed feelings about, but I will get to that later in the article.

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Springfield did say that the receiver extension on the rifle is made from 7075 aluminum and is mil-spec in diameter. Seeing as so many manufacturers cheap out a bit and go for weaker material, I was pleased to learn that Springfield is taking durability seriously. Notice the all BCM furniture on the rifle, every component is American made.

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The 16″ barrel is a 1:8″ twist M4 profile unit that features a mid-length gas system, a bit of an oddity when we are talking sub-thousand dollar ARs. The SAINT also features a heavy buffer to keep the recoil to a minimum.

Springfield also fitted an F height front sight post, a decision that I questioned until I thought about the objective of the rifle. The conventional polymer handguards and front sight post allow them to maintain an unloaded weight of under 7 pounds.

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Earlier in the picture of the whole rifle, you might have noticed that the trigger was a pretty silver/gray color. That would be because Springfield sourced a nickel teflon coated trigger, very possibly from BCM. I won’t be able to confirm my suspicions until I get one in my hands to spend some quality time with.

The trigger pull was smooth and clean like you would expect from a coated trigger. Without a trigger pull gauge my calibrated finger tells me it was about a 7 pound pull on my scoped SAINT and about the same on the MRO equipped gun.

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Other notable features on the rifle include the larger trigger guard, mil-spec lower parts kit, and nice selector markings. On the flip side of the rifle, you find a large SAINT logo laser etched into the mag well. I would have preferred the logo to be an outline only.  You also might notice that the rifle has a UTG PRO backup iron sight fitted right out of the box. The Springfield people tell me that they wanted to make sure that the rifle was ready to shoot right out of the box.

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If you have read any of the other AR-15 posts I have put up, you know that I am a bit of a stickler for staking both on the gas key and the end plate. Springfield seems to echo my feelings about staking and made sure that both parts aren’t going anywhere with clean and secure staking jobs.

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Continuing with the bolt carrier group, Springfield chrome lined both the gas key and the interior of the bolt. This means that when you have to clean those parts, they will be far less of a pain to get the carbon removed. The bolt carrier is yet another nice mil-spec part that has some Springfield branding laser etched onto it that looks pretty awesome peaking through the ejection port.

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We started out by zeroing the rifles we had just put together before moving onto the fun stuff. Starting with the scoped rifle, we loaded up some mags of Gold Metal Match 69 grain and got to it.

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Once I started shooting from a semi-supported position, I was pretty pleased with the tiny groups I was shooting. We were only about 25 yards away, but I was rather pleased with how well the rifle and I got along. Below is my worst group and my best group, with a 1″ wide piece of tape as an aiming point, I don’t know if I could have done much better.

Sight in 2

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Once we dialed in both rifles, it was time to take the MRO equipped rifle over to the next bay for our first surprise, something Springfield called popper palooza. 100 poppers from Action Targets were set up for us to knock down and we had 120 rounds to do it with, all under the timer. I will go into detail about the experience in part two of the launch coverage but rest assured that I held my own against the other attendees.

popper

We tucked the rifles away after they cooled, seeing them again the next day at the long range event. Springfield had steel set up for us from 50 yards all the way to 300 yards. With the Bushnell equipped rifle, hitting the plates at those distances proved to be a walk in the park. Hit after hit started to bore me, so I called one of the trainers, Steve, over to spot me on a steel plate a bit further out.

Prone 960

960 yards from the line to be exact.

Taking a thousand yard shot is no easy task, even with a properly equipped rifle, with a non-free floated, assembly line AR-15, I must be a moron. Once the disbelief fell away from Steve’s face, he stumbled a bit and said “Let me …  let me do some math” walking away to grab a confirmed range and the proper firing solution for the 1000 yard shot.

Once Steve came back, he told me what my hold was and scooted in behind a spotting scope. Neither he or I could pick up the first three shots; then Steve called a miss on the fourth shot by about a foot. On the fifth attempt, to both Steve and my disbelief, I landed a hit on the 960-yard gong out of a 16″ box stock, sub thousand dollar rifle.

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Wow. But was it repeatable? The two out of the next three shots we believe were hits because of the lack of an impact in the dirt. The next shot was an audible hit.

Holy crap. I was hitting at a 1000 yards off a backpack with the SAINT.

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My only gripe about the SAINT? While not really a problem since 99.9% of shooters aren’t going to shoot like this, the handguards seem to have a bit of an issue with heat when throwing lead downrange at a high volume. After 8 magazines the handguard cap melted the plastic tabs that keep the front of the handguard in place. After several more magazines, I ran out of ammo and pulled the handguards the rest of the way off to inspect them. They were pretty well screwed and would need replacement.

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90% of those mags in front of the rifle were mine.

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Do I think that Springfield built a rifle we should take seriously? Absolutely. While the MSRP is a bit stiff, I expect the street price to be closer to $700 – $750. Anything under $800 and you have a rifle that you should look at closely and consider over the other options on the market, after all, that 1:8″ twist barrel isn’t exactly common and it allows you to wring the accuracy out of almost any commercially avalable load on the shelf.

The SAINT’s MSRP is right about $899 and will be in stores soon, but until then you can check out the Defend Your Legacy site for more information HERE.



Patrick R

Patrick is a Senior Writer for The Firearm Blog and works in the shooting sports industry. He is an avid recreational shooter and a verified gun nerd. With a lifelong passion for shooting, he has a love for all types of firearms, especially handguns and the AR-15 platform. Patrick may be contacted at tfbpatrick@gmail.com.

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • Twilight sparkle

    It’s hard to get excited about another ar nowadays but that’s a lot of good features at that price point. The rear stock could have been staked better and the choice of rear sight is… Interesting and while utg has a bad rep their pro line has earned some recognition. I’m just confused as to why they mounted that sight so far forward.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      The PRO line is US made and of decent quality. It wouldn’t be my first choice, but I didn’t build the damned thing.

      • Twilight sparkle

        I’ve had luck with a few utg pro handguards, not keyboard warrior worthy but when you’re in college you pinch penny’s where you can.

        • Mack

          I have ran their handgaurds hard, their finish doesn’t hold up the greatest, but the rest of the handguard is solid.

          • Twilight sparkle

            sometimes a worn finish can look cool anyways, or you can just cerakote it

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          Hey man, I’m not hating. As long as you are shootin’!

    • AC97

      I have a UTG A2 stock kit installed that isn’t made in the US.

      How urgent is it that I replace it?

      • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

        If it is a range toy, leave it. If it is a rifle you might rely on, replace it before adding anymore lasers to your rifle.

      • Twilight sparkle

        Not urgent, I’ve used utg stuff before just for shiggles

        As said before I could respond if you wanna rely on it you should replace it (sooner rather than later since parts might get bought up after election time, not trying to be political, just practical) but if it’s a gun for fun you should keep it till you get the urge to change it

        • AC97

          Well, seeing as I only have one AR (which does have a rifle length gas system on a 20 inch barrel)…

          What stock and buffer system would you recommend? Vltor A5? Carbine style?

          • Twilight sparkle

            Depends on the intended purpose, if you’re going for a dmr type set up I’d look into a magpul prs kit or an lmt dmr.

            For a jack of all trades gun I would throw on any collapsible stock kit and call it a day you’d just want to look for a receiver extension (buffer tube) made of 7075 aluminum. It might look weird at first but it’s perfectly functional

            Ultimately the choice is yours

          • AC97

            Probably the latter (jack-of-all-trades). Also, I really don’t really care all that much about how something looks, just as long as it works well, I’m okay with it.

          • Nick

            Yes, the VLTOR A5 is preferred, with the second best choice being a standard carbine buffer tube w/ HH buffer.

          • AC97

            By that, you mean H2?

          • Nick

            No, I mean HH, but H2 would likely be fine, as the difference is very minor.

          • Twilight sparkle

            I don’t think you’re going to get as much benefit from a heavier buffer in a rifle length gas system as you would in the generally over gassed carbine gas system. A carbine buffer should be fine

          • Nick

            I’m not posting this because I “think” the HH buffer is ideal, but rather because Colt Canada says the heavier buffer is the most reliable, and so does the US Army and US Marine Corps, who went with an even heavier buffer called the “H6”.

          • Twilight sparkle

            I was just saying that incase money was an issue for that person they shouldn’t worry too much while parts are starting to get scarce on something that may not have much benefit over something that comes with a cheaper stock kit. I use h and h2 buffers on my serious guns but I don’t feel like they add much other than an improved recoil impulse.

            The price of an h2 buffer could possibly be better spent on mags

          • roguetechie

            I run a mix of carbine and h2 buffers on my 20 inch rifle length gas system guns…

            If you’re just flinging 55/62 grain that’s commercial spec and maybe not truly to full milspec pressure the carbine buffer makes for a great shooter.

            I do however run a variety of H and H2 type buffers on my 1:8 & 1:7 guns or anything under 20 inches.

            The truly awesome, but frustrating for beginners part of AR15’s is just how freakishly customizable they are out of the box!

            Real performance altering change is not just completely within reach of anyone with $23 and an internet connection, but is actually tragically unavoidable unless a consumer self educates to a pretty high level.

  • Nick

    Can we please just all agree to let KeyMod die already?

    • David Harmon

      Because you don’t like it? Seems a bit ridiculous, if it didn’t have support it wouldn’t be an option still.

      • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

        Because it is an inferior option.

        • David Harmon

          It’s inferior how exactly? They are two completely different things…

          • CommonSense23

            MLOK is the better option. Keymod isn’t bad. But Magpul improved on the concept.

          • snmp

            MLOK => patented but could you could ask free licence to magpul (One day magpul could be revoke the free licence)
            Keymod => Open source & without licence ( in the public domain)

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Pull through with KeyMod is a thing. The tapered part of the hole is thinner and more susceptible to the bolt pulling through under a load.

          • David Harmon

            What in the hell are you guys doing, hanging off trees with your rifle? I’ve had none of these issues with mine. The light and laser stay “zeroed”.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            I break things. It is what I do.

          • Sam

            Any source for this? I’ve seen so many people hating on KeyMod saying it’s weaker but I have yet to see any thorough comparison.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Just a test run by KAC that was never published and personal experience.

          • Black Dots

            Harder to manufacture, easier to get wrong during manufacturing, easier to screw up mounting an accessory (i.e., it’s relatively easy to overtorque the screws when installing an accessory), less surface area to lock down the screws to, shear force applied to the rail as opposed to lateral force with MLOK, and less force is needed to knock/pull the accessories off the rail as opposed to MLOK.

            Oh, and it’s just plain ugly.

          • David Harmon

            I’ve no issues with that.

          • Nick

            Black Dots nailed it, but I would like to expand on one point, and add two as well.

            1) Keymod is indeed harder to manufacture, which translates to more machine time, which translates to more cost. More cost = less likelihood of widespread adoption.

            2) Magpul, the king of accessories, isn’t supporting Keymod. There are a few mom & pop businesses out there making Keymod accessories, but the 9000 pound gorilla isn’t. Big problem.

            3) The US Army just adopted M-LOK on the CSASS rifle. That means it is now or will soon be a military standard, or MILSPEC. That’s big.

          • Steve

            So if M-LOK is so much cheaper to produce, why is there barely any difference in the cost of the rails?

            People keep going on about this like it matters to the consumer. If the only difference in a $200ish rail is only $20, that isn’t a deciding factor for me. Why isn’t more of this supposed massive savings in production being passed down to us plebes by the mighty Magpul et al on high?

          • Nick

            This comment makes no sense whatsoever. Since when do manufacturers pass down all cost savings to consumers? You’re also ignoring the real performance benefits of M-LOK, accessory support, and the fact it doesn’t look like tiny little dicks on the side of the rifle.

          • With exception of Magpul, I have no issues finding similar accessories if not the exact same thing for both systems.

            IME it is really six of one, half dozen of another. So unless something you simply must have is only available for one I don’t feel anyone can go wrong with either.

          • iksnilol

            There’s the truth y’all, you don’t like Keymod cause y’all are a bunch of homophobes.

            Called it.

          • Charlie Victor Alpha

            Wrong! I’ve got a Spikes lower with the dueling dicks logo, and I hate keymod!

          • LetsTryLibertyAgain

            A technically superior product with much broader standards support in the industry and thus much greater consumer demand, for $20 less? That’s a winning product. You seem to have the supply and demand function backwards. Magpul doesn’t need to lower the price of M-LOK products any further to quickly dispatch KeyMod to the dustbin of AR history. Why should they?

            The likely reason KeyMod is only $20 more expensive is more the result of marketing than manufacturing. KeyMod is discounted to get the last of them to sell in an M-LOK world. Selling KeyMod at a loss is still better than eating a bunch of KeyMod rails once nobody and I do mean nobody wants them.

            It’s not a show stopper. SAINT 2.0 can get an M-LOK polymer rail upgrade that doesn’t melt under rapid fire. Hopefully that’ll be a warranty replacement for the early adopters.

          • Patrick Karmel Shamsuddoha

            because profit margins are a real thing! lower production costs mean more money in a business pocket if they compete at current market prices

        • David Harmon

          conjecture.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            It when facts and testing have proven the same.

          • David Harmon

            Pfft. No one cares about your “facts and testing”.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Ah, so that is why KeyMod is still selling. Gotcha.

          • David Harmon

            I have it because my laser stays indexed when I pull it apart.

      • valorius

        How long was it before Pontiac cancelled the Aztec?

        • David Harmon

          Mainly because they didn’t sell at all. Keymod is selling fine. BCM is a popular brand.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      AMEN!

      I would have been a bad person if I hadn’t said something to them at the event. Just say no to ShelfMod.

    • TDog

      Hey, now! KeyMod’s for when you need to attach lasers, lights, and bookshelves to your rifle! Nothing wrong with being tactical AND well-read at the same time! 😀

      • JSIII

        They have this thing called MLOK and it ROKS.

        • Sunshine_Shooter

          Yeah, but does it interface with modular shelving you can buy at Home Depot? Didn’t think so.
          Point: KeyMod

    • Black Dots

      I propose we have the editorial staff of TFB broker an armistice between BCM and Magpul. Bill Geissele can mediate.

      • Harry’s Holsters

        What’s funny is a believe Magpul OEMs some of their polymer accessories. I know they helped with one of the stocks BCM designed.

    • iksnilol
      • Nick

        Picatinny will not die, but Keymod definitely will.

      • valorius

        LOL

    • But think of all the shelving units!

      • Ambassador Vader

        Save the Shelves!
        Shelf Lives Matter!

  • Sampson

    I think I’ll stick to their M1A offerings. I’m sorry, but this just screams “me too!” – certainly overhyped and over-promised with all the secretive advertising with the celebrity gun athletes and all.

  • Edeco

    *yawn* Saint very interesting.

    The gun I mean. Good writeup. I wanted to know what it is and TFB delivered. Especially GJ melting the handguard. I don’t blame anyone here for the hype, and I pretty much knew it would be.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      It is a lot better than the other ARs on the market at that price point. Like I said, it is going to be very easy for shooters to gloss over the awesome that the SAINT hides.

      • Edeco

        Well, OK. My modern assaulting rifle needs having long been met, I don’t know all of the parts lists from the various makers. I take the accuracy with a grain of salt, I mean, unless they garuntee it or build a history of delivering it off the shelf…

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          Fair enough. My needs were met as well, I am still buying a couple to have some solid basic ARs.

          • Edeco

            Huh. Maybe if my mom wanted a house gun and the SA was in stock locally, and Stag, Smith, Colt, Ruger etc were in fact conclusively beat. If I had funds and room on the coffee table for another AR for myself, being an entheusiast, I have a laundry list of more specialized goals I’d want it to hit.

  • David Harmon

    I would still rather pay more to build one. I hate plastic where plastic doesn’t belong, like around things that get hot…

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Dude, I dumped 270 – 300 rounds through the gun in less than 10 minutes. Of course something is going to melt. I baked the flash hider free of most of its oils and finish, that doesn’t https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8cb6ab39e32bbe6f8e40698504d826e2806a93b2c3721c5819679e84c3f66105.jpg mean it sucks.

      • iksnilol

        First time I see a flash hider lose its finish

      • David Harmon

        That’s a normal training session….

        I like that they used 7000 series Al in the receiver, but the rest of the rifle leaves something to be desired for me.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          I don’t think they intended it to be an out of the box and done rifle, but something that can grow with a shooter as they progress.

          • iksnilol

            At that point you might as well just build a rifle yourself.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            It if you are a new or novice shooter. For most consumers the SAINT is perfect.

          • iksnilol

            and the melty parts just add character, right ?

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Most shooters aren’t going to shoot anywhere near enough to bake the finish off of parts or melt handguards.

            This was one of those uncommon shooting sessions, had in not had over a dozen mags laying in front of me loaded I would have never seen the hand guards melt.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, but if one intense session can melt the handguards and bake the finish off, that tells me it isn’t really durable.

            I mean, what happens if you take it to a carbine class or something?

            Splurging a hunnid more to get something waaay more durable seems like a no brainer to me.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Even in a carbine class you wouldn’t be shooting that fast. I wish I had recorded me shooting so you can get an idea of the volume of fire, but imagine the popper palooza a bit faster and with “suppressive fire” thrown in there for fun.

            We were briefed to make it look good for the cameras, so I shot a lot.

          • Edeco

            Ugh, most people would probably be fine with a receiver extension made of 6061 too, but you praise them for doing 7075.

            I’m glad you writers were treated to a week of hookers and blow 😛 But the handguard being grey velveeta is a problem for everyone because even if one doesn’t dump 300 rounds, that problem is waiting for you, where it wouldn’t be with aluminum.

  • Mystick

    Strategic Artificially Intelligent Nuclear Transport(Mod5) 🙂

  • CommonSense23

    Can we please stop using 1 in 8 twist and go to 1 in 7 or faster these days.

    • AC97

      “Faster”? Out of curiosity, what practical purpose would a twist rate faster than a 1 in 7 serve?

      • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

        So he can get the bullets on target faster .. duh!

      • CommonSense23

        It’s better at a distance. Faster twist rates are better with higher quality ammo at distance. The issue is a slower twist rate produces better groups at a hundred yards. But the faster produces better at a distance. The real world results are you get a slight improvement at a 100 yards by going slower but a bigger pay off by going faster past transonic.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          That is not how any of this works.

        • AC97

          Citation needed. I don’t buy that at all.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Why? Because it is a load of crap? Probably a good reason.

          • AC97

            Do twist rates faster than 1 in 7 even exist? And if so, are they even mass-produced?

          • DW

            Russian AKs74U reportedly have faster twist rates. Still cant hit worth crap at long range (source: SADJ and an article here at TFB that interviewed an ex-spetsnez

          • iksnilol

            Eh, their problem is more likely them being so lightweight and with what’s essentially pistol sights.

          • DW

            Yes, but mechanically though, 74U is just too short and using bullets not optimized for them.

          • iksnilol

            Wish somebody could test it. Put a S74U in a ransom rest or something. Something so that it can’t move.

            I don’t think the barrel length has much to say about the accuracy.

          • DW

            unless it’s so short the bullet couldn’t stabilize

          • Nick

            Yes, hyper twist barrels are a thing, but only really for long range cartridges intended to push the limits of the caliber beyond transonic.

          • AC97

            But that would be almost, if not completely useless for the average AR-15 user.

          • Nick

            There are some companies playing around with twist rates that would blow your mind, but yes, for the average user it’s unnecessary. But just watch as the standard twist rate for .308 gas guns starts to get faster. 1:10 is now standard, I expect 1:8 or 1:7 to become more common soon.

          • CommonSense23

            And how is a 1:8 twist going to benefit the average user over a 1:7 or faster?

          • AC97

            And would it actually matter for the average user whether it’s a 1 in 8 twist or 1 in 7?

            Since I don’t have a 1 in 8 twist barrel, I couldn’t care less about what your preference for a barrel twist rate is.

            Suit yourself.

          • CommonSense23

            Yes they do. Mass produced no.

          • Thomas S

            He isn’t entirely wrong. Faster twist rates are able to better stabilize a heavy projectile, which was the point in the military going to a 1:7 to begin with. A heavy projectile is affected less by environmental variables such as wind speed less, producing better accuracy at long range. Also having more mass rotating a bit faster means the bullet is better spin stabilized and more difficult to alter from it’s trajectory by environmental factors such as wind.

            As far as I know though that has only ever been applied to rifles shooting far heavier bullets (300 grains +) at ranges like 1500 meters + by HTI trained types. I don’t know that the effect would even amount to negligible firing anything like a 5.56. There is also a real possibility of too much twist, hence why we don’t see anything tighter than 1:7 on these rifles.

            1:8 is fine in an AR. Not too fast to be inaccurate with lighter weight ammo like 55gr but fully capable of stabilizing round in the 70gr range.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            That is true, but looking for something past 1:7″ on a off the shelf rifle is a bit dumb.

          • Thomas S

            True. Honestly anything faster than 1:7 on a 5.56 isn’t all that useful in any case. I would like to see some work done on the practical effects of 1:7 vs 1:8 on 70 – 77gr projectiles though. Someone may have already done it and I just haven’t gone to look, but I wonder if it is even worth worrying about on any 5.56 rifle.

            Hell the fact that you were getting hits at near 1k with a 16″ off the rack 5.56 is already impressive. A bit beyond the reasonable asking of the rifle to begin with for anything but “can I do it” or the fun factor though. Simply not enough left in the energy budget to count on it taking any game down at that range.

          • CommonSense23

            Getting hits at a 1000 yards with a rack grade AR isn’t anything special. Since links disappear hear. Google the Loose Rounds article about making hits at a 1000 yards using a 14.5inch barrel with iron sights using both M855 and MK262.

          • Zachary marrs

            When you aren’t insulting people, perhaps you should look at the folks testing 1/6 AR barrels.

            Just don’t lose it and insult them

          • Thomas S

            Hmmm, now this is interesting. I will have to go an have a look.

            I am slightly ashamed that I was not aware that this was a thing.

        • Mack

          Somebody poured you a nice tall glass of koolaid and you shugged that thing.

          • Zachary marrs

            Compared to a writer calling a commenter retarded?

        • Sam

          It wouldn’t make sense to make an AR that is sub-$1,000 with a barrel rifling that is geared specifically for expensive ammo when 55gr and 62gr are far-and-away the most popular weights… which 1/8 is best for.

          • Zachary marrs

            Both 55gr and 62gr work just fine in a 1/7 twist.

            1/7 was adopted not only because the longer m856 tracers, but because it was found that 1/7 would work better with heavier projectiles that might appear in the future.

          • FarmerB

            They work fine in 1-10 as well

          • Zachary marrs

            And 1/7 lets you shoot pretty much everything that you can fit in a 5.56 case

          • FarmerB

            Definitely agree – just pointing out that you don’t need 1-7 or 1-8 for most bullets in a non-military setting.

          • Zachary marrs

            I’d imagine most people would much rather have a twist that can stabilize pretty much everything great, compared to a twist rate that is more or less limited to 62gr and lighter.

            Heavier 5.56 is really quite popular, and a fair number of AR shooters have rifles set up for long range accuracy, and they aren’t using m855

          • FarmerB

            Depends on where you are and the scenario. For situations that mandate 5.56 and require longer range, then this sort of thing makes more sense (I don’t consider 1000 yds to be long range). But 99.5% of ammunition shot with a 5.56 semi-auto Is 55/62/69 gn projectiles no matter where you’re talking about.

          • Zachary marrs

            *sigh*

            If you don’t get it by now, nothing i can say will change that.

          • FarmerB

            That’s right, nothing will change my opinion – because I DO get it, I just don’t agree (declaration: all my .223 rifles are 1:10″ and I have other highly accurate centrefire .22 rifles that are slower). But if I was shooting in a competition at 1000 yds that required me to use .223R, then I would reconsider the twist, but that’s not my situation.

          • CommonSense23

            Best for what exactly. So if your goal is to shoot 100 rounds groups with a non free floated barrel using. 55gr to 62 gr. Yeah I would agree. 1 in 8 is better. But that is a pretty weird standard to strive to unless your whole point is advertising your group size at a 100 yards using that size.

          • Charlie Victor Alpha

            Dude, do you think any potential customer of this new Springfield
            product gives a flying rip about anything you’re saying? No. They just
            want a rifle that works with anything they feed it, which this setup
            does, minus the melty parts. Go push your “knowledge” on AR15 dot com.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Are you retarded?

      • CommonSense23

        No I just actually understand what twist rates do to bullets.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          I don’t think you do.

          • CommonSense23

            Well considering NSWC Crane and the number one civilian consultant for long range shooting is where I learned this from going to disagree.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Again, wrong.

          • Nick

            Patrick, you may be my new favorite gun blogger. I’m dying over here…

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Not sure how to take that Nick, should we call for help?

          • mig1nc

            Weather plays a role as well. Most of us don’t need 1/7 because we aren’t shooting in arctic warfare conditions. The military might have to, so they need 1/7.

          • FarmerB

            1-7 was for tracers.

          • Zachary marrs

            or longer projectiles, which was one of the reasons why they went with it on the a2, versus 1/9, 18, and others

          • AC97

            And we should believe that you’re not making that up because…?

        • Yes, some higher grainage bullets do need a faster than 1:8″ twist rate barrel. But I haven’t seen one that needs a faster than 1:8″ twist rate barrel, and would also fit in a NATO mag.

          All the ones I know about are port loading only.

          • CommonSense23

            Grain weight has the opposite effect that people think. Its projectile length that is the primary dictator of twist rate. All projectiles benefit from a faster twist rate past a certain distance. The issue comes into effect the more variance you have the slower twist rate you want before the round goes transonic, and the faster you want after it hits transonic. But a faster twist has less of a practical effect at close ranges than a slower does past transonic.

          • Faster twist rate = better simply isn’t true. The twist rate needs to be matched to the projectile if you are going for extreme accuracy. The Camp Perry crowd order their twist rates down to the quarter inch.

            And all the bullets I am aware of all the market that fit in a standard magazine will shooter well at 1:8″. Heck even the 80gr VLDs which are a port loaded round shoots very well through 1:8″ tubes.

            And yes I am aware that projectile length is what dictates the twist rate. But with exception of a few non-traditional rounds higher weight = longer bullet.

          • CommonSense23

            Okay with the first paragraph I completely agree. Faster twist rate doesn’t automatically equal better for everyone. The Camp Perry guys are a special breed. But the Camp Perry Guys know the exact range they are shooting at every time with the same projectile. And they don’t represent even 1% of the shooting population.
            The issues is the average shooter military and civilian is moving to short and shorter barrels. And with 5.56 that is effecting the transonic range. Faster rates are a benefit past transonic. And better quality rounds with less variance are slowly but surely flooding the market these days which benefit faster twist rates for the average shooter.
            So if you told me I know the exact range and firing schedule I will shoot, and that’s all that rifle has to do and shoot only one type of round. Yeah I would more than likely go the slowest twist rate I can. But if I have to have a shorter barrel rifle in the 10 to 16 inch range firing a wide amount of ammo from cheap training rounds to far higher quality rounds like MK262 or 70gr from a range of point blank to extreme ranges. I’m going to go a far faster rate. Which is something that is slowly becoming more common fortunately. Its why the new CSASS this blog talked about recently is supposed to have a 1 in 8 twist running 7.62.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            “But if I have to have a shorter barrel rifle in the 10 to 16 inch range firing a wide amount of ammo from cheap training rounds to far higher quality rounds like MK262 or 70gr from a range of point blank to extreme ranges.”

            That is quite literally what 1:8″ twist is for.

          • Zachary marrs

            We can put our stock in years of research and experience, that says that 1/7 is pretty d*mn great

            Or we can listen to you.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            I didn’t say that 1:7 twist doesn’t have it’s place. In fact, all but one of my ARs has a 1/7 twist barrel. There is a reason that most “precision” ars have a 1:8 twist barrel, they stabilize common match bullets pretty dang well.

            1:7 twist is ok with the 62-77 grain window, but was really designed for the longer tracer bullets as I understand it.

          • Zachary marrs

            yet when someone disagrees with you, you call them retarded, and mock them?

            “as you understand it”, is not the whole story

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Are you jealous?

            Feel free to cough up data that proves me wrong, but that is the reason the military went with the 1:7 twist.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            While you are right about bullet length and twist rates, just about no AR shooter is shooting the .223 or 5.56 at distances that would allow the bullet to drop into the transonic range.

      • Zachary marrs

        Classy.

    • Edeco

      Eh, it almost bugs me that my 1-in-8’er can’t use 90 grain ammo, but I think faster twist lowers MV slightly and wears out faster*. So I dont mind since I think it’s perfect for 75’s and better for lighter, commodity-grade ammo.

      *Negligible, you mjght say. Well, it’s not that important for me to be able to run 90 grainers.

    • raz-0

      1:9 was the thing. Then 1:7. 1:8 came up along with .223 wylde to make barrels that shoot most anything you are likley to find out there without grenading the light bullets or failing to sstabilize the heavy ones. It’ll shoot 50gr to 77gr bullets just peachy.

      It is the right answer for anything 16″ or longer.

  • TDog

    Meh… another AR.

    They should’ve (could’ve?) brought in the Croatian VHS-2 or some other item to really get folks excited.

    I should also note that saints, by definition, are all dead.

    • Black Dots

      Mmmmmmm….slavic FAMAS.

      • TDog

        I would love to own either.

        (although don’t let the folks here hear you say that – it looks like a FAMAS, acts like a FAMAS, is the same caliber as a FAMAS, but it ain’t a FAMAS!) 😉

        • Black Dots

          *cracks open door* FAMAS! *runs away*

        • DW

          I have a FAMAS, I have a G36, UGH! VHS!

          • TDog

            I just want a VHS so I can use it with a Betamax, er, Beta C-Mag.

            (come on… y’all know that was funny! The two competing videotape formats? Anyone?)

    • Anomanom

      Truth bruh, truth. Another AR that will be virtually indistinguishable from the other 8999 ARs on the market.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      Not to be outdone, Remingon will release the Martyr.

      • iksnilol

        Knowing their quality it’ll make you its namesake.

  • Black Dots

    Yay at BCM furniture showing up on a non-BCM rifle. Boo to the g*ddamn Keymod showing up on a non-BCM rifle. I was hoping the number of manufacturers promoting it was starting to drop, but here we are. I can only imagine that SA was trying to help their AR stand out by going with BCM as opposed to Magpul.

    Is the barrel chrome lined? Anyone else think this might just be a BCM rifle with a different roll mark on it?

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      The barrel is not chrome lined. I can’t seem to find the page in my notes that says what it is, but the sciencey guy at Springfield had a conversation about the coating used and he had some solid facts as to why it was better.

      I will update the article if I can find the page.

      “I can only imagine that SA was trying to help their AR stand out by going with BCM as opposed to Magpul.”

      ^ Nailed It^

      • Black Dots

        Cool thanks. I’d like to find out what the lining is. Chrome has been the standard for a long time, but it’s safe to say metallurgy has advanced over the past few decades.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          Maybe melonite?

    • David Harmon

      A lot of us like Keymod.

      • Nick

        A lot of people are wrong about a lot of things. Such is life.

  • Black Dots

    To be my non-cynical self, this looks like a good value. Figure street price will be around $750-$800. At that price, you could replace the hand guard and still come out under MSRP. The name is a bit wonky, but in the end you get what appears to be a well-sorted AR backed by SA’s solid customer service.

    • Rick O’Shay

      The name pairs well with the Spike’s Crusader. Most people I know have enough sense not to throw money at something just for pairing names though.

      • Black Dots

        I am one of those people, but then again, you don’t know me.

    • James Reeves

      I still need to see more, but I may agree with Dots. If this is a chrome lined or melonite bore, this is almost exactly how I would set up an AR. (I’d also like to see the barrel profile, because it doesn’t look like an M4 profile, nor should it be in this config.)

      *Mid Length
      *1:8 twist, which is hard to find in a non-stainless barrel
      *MilSpec, everything staked
      *Chrome lined carrier and gas key
      *H buffer out of the box
      *Cheap AF

      Too bad the billboard on the magwell makes me want to throw up. If they could ship these out without huge rollmarks on both sides of the cliphole, I would probably snap one up.

      • raz-0

        1:8 is all over the place in CMV and stainless. Usually with .223 wylde chambers. It used to be uncommon that you found it in anything not stainless, but since CMV+QPQ nitriding hit the scene, it’s become much more common.

  • Rusty S.

    They missed a great chance for marketing copy: “‘Saint just another AR15…”

    • Zachary marrs

      Except it is

  • Twilight sparkle

    Will there be info on if there’s mpi, hpt, or any kind of barrel coating?

    Also I think that rear sight might not be from the “pro” line from utg

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      That USB a PRO rear sight. There are no forged made parts on the rifle.

      If I find my lost notes I will update he article

      • Twilight sparkle

        Well I checked the made in USA section on their websighg and I found no rear sights, I could have missed something though

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          No, you are right. Looks like I got bad info at the event, it appears they used at least one foreign made part.

          • Twilight sparkle

            Perhaps they decided to not count the rear sight as part of the gun.

  • iksnilol

    And disappointment of the year goes toooo… Springfield Armory!

    Because somebody has to compete with Remington.

    • Nick

      Now THAT was funny…

    • DW

      At least Remington brought something new to the tanble: Inexpensive and relatively slim 15+1 45ACP powerhouse if it works, laughstick of 2016 if it fails.

      • Out of the Blue

        And an incentive for FN to finally make an FNS-45 if it’s not terrible.

      • Sunshine_Shooter

        At least Springfield is bringing something that isn’t likely to fire out of battery to the table.

  • USMC03Vet

    Please bring back the hot sweaty chicks in yoga pants instead, Springfield?

  • datimes

    Where are the sweaty nubile women?

  • For all those who dreamed of Springfield coming out with something actually new? Up yours, people!

  • Charlie Victor Alpha

    SO…..a middy M4gery that melts when you shoot it. Nice. My home-brew fixed middy manages to not melt, but then again I used Magpul furniture. It would’ve been nice to see them partner with another brand thats not already being used as an OEM product instead of BCM, maybe Strike Industries or something. I like Springfield a lot, but the toilet bowl is plugged and overflowing, and they just flushed it again. I’m thinking their marketing campaign was a little over the top too, considering they’re about 4+ years late to the game.

  • Justy

    Wow, so all the fuss really WAS just another prebuilt babby’s-first-16″-AR.
    At least this one has the proper gas length and half decent furniture out of the box (except the handguard).
    I have nothing against keymod, but it doesn’t exactly lend itself to polymer parts, and the handguard itself melting off the rifle after a bit of magdumping is not exactly what I’d expect from a “legacy defending” accessory.
    Not sure why Springfield wanted to rediscover the polymer handguard when they settled for tried products with the grip and stock, or why they haven’t gone through the effort of testing the handguard with at least a fraction of the intensity they dedicated to the marketing campaign.

  • Captain Obvious

    Hmmm, another AR15 on the market. With the S&W Sport II the fastest selling AR in America followed by the Ruger AR, it looks like SA wants a piece of the pie as well. Makes sense and I am sure they will sell a bunch of them with the features it comes standard with. I am disappointed however and was hoping for something new and exciting.

  • Giolli Joker

    Sadly
    Another
    Insipid
    New
    Toy

    • Just say’n

      But XD fanboys will rejoice they can buy an AR from Springfield.
      (even if the handguards melt)

  • Dracon1201

    Springfield Armory, the bastion of creativity, building 1911s and AR15s, like noone else… -.-

    Needless to say that I have lost my morning wood.

  • LetsTryLibertyAgain

    Bwa ha ha ha ha. It’s just another AR!

    If I cared enough to care, I’d create a meme image of Ralphie with his Little
    Orphan Annie Secret Decoder Ring and a SAINT, with that incredulous
    disappointed look on his face saying, “It’s just a crappy commercial.”

    Marketing is intended to make us want to buy things. This is having the
    opposite effect on me. Admittedly, I am not Springfield’s target
    market, but their marketing on this product would make me feel ashamed
    to own their SAINT. I’d feel that I fell for the same glitzy ad they
    aimed at gullible and fashion conscious 20-somethings.

    We may look back at the introduction of the SAINT as a watershed moment
    in the firearms community. Before this moment, MSR was an abbreviation
    for Modern Sporting Rifle. Post-SAINT, MSR means Millennial Status
    Rifle.

    Keymod? That was on the discount ARs last year, after Magpul won the
    rail wars the year before. It makes me wonder if the Springfield marketing
    department has a snazzy promo video of the new SAINT that’s only
    available in BetaMax format.

    I knew from the Hyped To Hell(TM) marketing that I’d be disappointed on
    November 1st, and in that, they didn’t disappoint me. It was everything
    I expected.

    The sad part is, if the SAINT was introduced with the humility befitting
    such a late entry into a ridiculously crowded AR market, I’d have had a
    much more favorable opinion of it. It has some nice features and the
    MSRP hits a nice sweet spot in the market, offering good value. Sure,
    very late to the game, but another AR choice is always a good thing.
    But instead, the flashy over-the-top marketing makes it a parody of
    itself. Right up there with the HK brochure touting “Accuracy,
    Reliability – No Compromise”… with the cartridges loaded backwards in
    the magazine, in the foreground of the picture, larger than life, as if
    the marketing department feels the need to rub our noses in it.

    The SAINT. If you’ve never bought an AR before and don’t know anything
    about firearms, THIS is the AR-15 for you. Guaranteed +20 lifestyle
    points.

    I’d be very surprised (and a bit disappointed) if Colion Noir isn’t very
    embarrassed by the SAINT. Springfield seems to be making fun of him.

  • PeterK

    Daaaang, that is competitively priced. Good on ’em.

  • R

    So I guess they promoted the guy who came up with the “GRIP ZONE” logo.

  • TexianPatriot

    So let me get this straight.
    Springfield puts everyone in suspense for a couple months to release an AR15? Because that’s new…
    On top of that, it isn’t even a special ar, just a run of the mill basic ar, for a standard price, with plastic hand guards that melted.
    Thanks Springfield for blowing your wad on advertising. This is like the guy that is a minute man in bed asking if his partner came.

  • AtomicFrost

    After getting over the initial knee-jerk reaction of it just being another AR in an already overcrowded marketplace; it’s not a bad value.

    Most of the other budget “my first AR” models are incredibly stripped down with basic furniture. The BCG and bolt are quality, BCM is quality, and they kept it at a low weight. I wouldn’t be surprised if BCM supplied the lower parts kit for this rifle. Melonite lined barrel is an interesting choice.

    I wish it was M-LOK but it’s cheap and easy to swap that out.

    Does it ship with that hard case? If so that’s a bonus over the cardboard box most (all?) entry level AR rifles come in.

    Overall it’s a solid entry level rifle with way too much advertising.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      It will ship with the hard case.

  • Ron

    It’s length of the projectile not weight that is the determining factor on required spin rate. The coloration with heavier is that heavier projectiles tend to be longer, but that is not always the case. As noted the 1-7 was adopted for the M856 tracer which is only 1-2 grns heavier than the M855 round but required the 1-7 to stabilize it when the M855 could have been stabilized by the 1-10 to 1-9 twist rate.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      While it could have been stabilized by it, it isn’t really optimal for the 62 grain bullet. I think that is one of the areas the 1:8″ twist barrel shines.

  • Pete Sheppard

    Why oh WHY do companies have to go Ruger and use any flat surface as a billboard??? That wording carved into the mag well is a complete turn-off for me. At least I could paint over the M&P logo on my Sport II.
    Otherwise, it sounds like a well-built rifle.

  • Fred Johnson

    Photo of barrel profile under the melted handguard, please?

    • Fred Johnson

      Found a photo of the barrel profile over at TTAG.

  • ReadyorNot

    I like the 1/8 twist, really seems appropriate for the majority of ammo that’s out there, especially that of the plinking variety. Will they be selling complete or partial uppers too?

  • olivehead

    Man, this is a tough crowd. The MSRP on this is $899, and if the Smith Sport II and Ruger AR556 are any indication, you’re looking at roughly $799 retail. That’s about $100 more than the typical retail price of either the Smith or the Ruger. For that $100 extra, out of the box you get a mid-length (which everyone seems to argue is ideal for a 16″ barrel), and instead of the A2 grip and M4 stock that most will replace, you get a very good grip and stock (worth about $85 combined), a FA bolt carrier and H-buffer ($200), and what looks to be a trigger comparable to the PNT from BCM (about $45 I think). I think all in all that’s a pretty good deal.

  • JumpIf NotZero

    A lot more than meets the eye.

    Then shows a 100% typical AR where almost all the “unique” features can be seen from the outside.

    • James Reeves

      * Milspec internals
      * FA, Chrome Lined BCG
      * 1:8 twist barrel
      * Staked gas key
      * Staked castle nut
      * 7075 receiver extension
      * H buffer
      * Midlength gas tube

      mmkay… Another post where you are reaching deep to try to find something to criticize the author about. I’m not even mad, I’m impressed by your dedication.

      • Zachary marrs

        Literally all but 2 of the things you listed can be found on tons of AR’s. And the other 2 are also easy to find on other AR’s.

        He raises a good point, nothing about this gun makes it stand out from the crowd

        • James Reeves

          Yes, “literally” *all* of the things I listed can be found, individually, on tons of ARs. But all of those features (none of which is visible from the photo, which was the focus of the original gripe), in conjunction, set this one apart from a lot of what’s out there at the moment. Thus, Patrick’s comment is accurate. It seems like a well thought out AR in a very crowded market, and that isn’t visible purely from the exterior.

          • Zachary marrs

            There is nothing that sets it out from other AR’s

            The only “unique” features are viewable from the outside, the massive gripzone-esq “SAINT” on the lower, and the BCM handgaurds.

            Again, this is nothing groundbreaking.

  • Christian Hedegaard-Schou

    Personally, I welcome any and all new AR’s to the market. The more of the mainstream manufacturers that bring them means more innovation and lower prices. It also makes the guns themselves more and more mainstream and “common”, making them harder to ban in future years.

    But I am disappointed in all the hype that Springfield put into this only to introduce “yet another AR”.

    Ruger hyped the new MKIV pistol properly, and actually gave us something NEW.

    This is literally another AR, that in and of itself is good, but an AR without any special or compelling new and/or innovative features. FFS, the handguards melted. That doesn’t happen with Magpul handguards, which just shows you that SA used cheaper/inferior polymer (probably not glass filled, either).

    I also sincerely doubt the claim of a 7075 receiver extension when practically all other decent receiver extensions on the planet are 6000-series. And if they really did invest the extra money and effort into 7075 for the R.E., then why on earth didn’t they go the extra mil-spec step of the dry-film lubricant coating?

    So, bravo for another AR. The market needs that. But shame for “just” another AR.

    • Zachary marrs

      magpul handguards DO melt

  • Madcap_Magician

    … and AGAIN with the crazy stamping on the lower. You think they’d have learned after the whole GRIP ZONE thing, but no…

  • George

    This appears to be nearly identical to the BCM Mid16 Mod 0 Carbine. So is it made by BCM with Springfield graphics or is it Springfield assembling BCM parts?

  • George

    This piece appears nearly identical to the BCM Mid16 Mod0 Carbine. So the question is BCM building rifles for Springfield or is Springfield assembling BCM parts?

    • Sunshine_Shooter

      Unless BCM is letting their QC slip dramatically and cut every corner there is (HIGHLY doubtful) I don’t see how they could make a rifle for $850 MSRP after Springfield’s markup. I think BCM is the OEM for a few of the nicer elements of the rifle, but far from all of it.

  • valorius

    I really dig the textured handguard. The rest of the rifle seems to be pretty typical AR though.

    I considered the Saint, but I bought a Ruger AR556 instead.

  • Nocternus

    Adams Arms has a mid length 16″ ultralight AR with all Magpul furniture that comes in at 5.6 lbs for $700 and is a piston gun with Melonite coatings instead of chrome. Not sure what is so exciting about this rifle or its price.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      Di > Piston

      • Nocternus

        Depends on who you talk to. Personally I prefer the easy clean up and no gas in my face. Then again I am a Honda over Harley guy because I would rather ride a motorcycle than work on one.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          My DI guns that I regularly shoot the crap out of haven’t had an issue. In fact, I have seen far more issues with piston guns than DI guns. If you feel the piston gun is more reliable, have at it. I disagree.

          • Blaine

            There’s definitely a reason piston guns ran out of style. Too heavy on the front end, proprietary parts and internal damage from carrier tilt. Plus, they are no more reliable than any quality DI gun.

  • Just say’n

    So the “Saint” is just another AR (with sh!tty handguards) for XD owners?
    #notimpressed

  • Zachary marrs

    What facts? He’s just said “no” “wrong” and “incorrect”

    Please, show me some facts

  • George

    For some reason this post keeps getting deleted. I will try again. Compare the Saint with BCM Mid16 Mod0. Identical with the exception of the chrome lined barrel. So is BCM building guns for SA or is SA assembling BCM parts?

    • Zachary marrs

      i think it is pretty safe to say neither.

      just because they are using BCM furniture, doesn’t mean it’s made by them.

      its no more similar or different than a PSA 16” middie

  • Dan

    Really? You can find 1/8 twist barrels all over the place. Also, the rear sight is made by Leapers, in China.

    • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

      The PRO line is US made.

      Sure, they are all over the place, but not already installed on a rifle that will street for $750 or so.

      • Doug Larsen

        You sure about that, Patrick? Ruger AR-556. 1:8 twist. $599. Oh, and did I mention the Ruger barrel is also cold hammer forged??

        You’ve claimed the Saint has unique features that in fact aren’t unique at all. Was it the helicopter ride? The fireworks? Good food? You’re a good writer, but this write-up on the Saint reeks of being an “advertorial”. Makes me wonder if you’d have the same opinion of the rifle absent thousands of dollars worth of being wined and dined by its manufacturer.

        At the very least you seem uninformed about what’s available in the sub-$1,000 AR market these days. The Saint is not unique. At all. The Aero Precision AC-15 has equal or better specs for $699. Same with the Ruger at $599. Even PSA can build a comparable rifle for < $700.

        This type of review is why people hardly buy gun magazines anymore. We all figured out the "reviews" were actually advertorials. Shame to see that dynamic transfer to the online space.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          My opinion would have been the same had they shipped the rifle to me for testing like everyone else does or flown me out and stuffed me in a Motel 6.

          I admit, I was not aware that the Ruger was a 1:8 twist barrel, but the SAINT is the only 1:8 twist barrel that is mid length to my knowledge.

          The thing is, this rifle isn’t going to compete with the Aero or the PSA when it is sitting on the rack at the local Gander Moutian. I fell that where this rifle shines is that for a bit more money than the options an online savvy buyer has available, the SAINT will be at the local sporting goods chain sitting next to the Bushmasters and DPMS rifles that the uninformed consider “tier 1” brands.

          Are there better options? Absolutely. Does the general public know how to shop for a new AR-15 to find the best rifle at the best price? No. I still feel that the SAINT offers a reasonably good option to the guy that just wants an AR.

          Either way, my SAINTs should be here this week. I bought both of the rifles I used at the event and plan to do a complete write up on their condition. It my be rather eye opening, we shall see.

  • pcnotpc

    Almost as exciting as the release of another 1911. *yawn*

  • Don’t do 3 parts on this… No One Cares.

  • Thamuze Ulfrsson
  • ODgreen34

    Dammit I can never un see that now

    • Charlie Victor Alpha

      Thats what happened to me several years ago, after I bought the lower. Now I have an AR with dicks on it.

  • AirborneSoldier

    They fix the handguards, im there. Cmon SA you can do better!

  • Doug Larsen

    You can find the Ruger and Smith (likely
    Competitors) for $599 all day long. And the Ruger comes with a CHF 1:8 twist barrel, a nice grip, good BUIS, 9310 bolt, a delta ring that is actually innovative and smart, great fit and finish, and the rifle is known to work well. Given this, I just don’t see the appeal or value in the “Saint”.

    This entire article also strikes me as a “We wined and dined you, now go write that this is the bestest cheap AR everrrs!” type of deal. Just like the gun rags. Maybe I’m wrong about that, but that’s the impression I get. I’m sure the rifle is fine, but “best” at its price point? That is HIGHLY debatable.