MAC Plays with the Beretta 92S – The M9’s Daddy

Capture

While the lineage of the Beretta M9 can trace its way all the way back to The Great War, its common for the pistols designed in the intervening years to be overshadowed by the service of the first and latest models. Most shooters I know think the M9 was a new design out of thin air just for the US military.

The M9, as we know it today, was not the result of a single designer. Instead, it was an evolution on a platform that is now over a century old. The first open slide handguns was the Modelo 1915, which was adopted as the service pistol for Italy during World War I. The blowback design was well-liked, if a little difficult to operate due to springs and relatively poor ergonomics. It was later supplanted by the Modelo 1917 in .32 ACP.

From there, the open slide concept was refined and updated to handle the higher power loads of 9mm. One of the late models, just before the US M9 was the model 92S, which was an update of the first Beretta 92. The most significant change (which many bemoan today) was the movement of a frame mounted safety to the slide mounted safety.

Tim over at Military Arms Channel has his hands on one of the classics. Enjoy the video below.

For those interested in the 92S, there are a few for sale directly from Classic Firearms for less than $400



Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • Slim934

    “One of the late models, just before the US M9 was the model 92S, which was an update of the first Beretta 92. The most significant change (which many bemoan today) was the movement of a frame mounted safety to the slide mounted safety.”

    What was the reasoning for doing this anyway? I can’t think of a single good reason to put the safety on the slide over the frame.

    • The change allowed for the addition of the decocking feature. Mind you, you don’t have to have a slide-mounted safety to have a decocker feature, but it followed the pattern set by the Walther PP and P38 families.

  • Dougscamo

    Let’s not forget 2 models of the 90 series that did NOT have safeties…..the 92D and 96D…..guys transitioning from 6-shooters loved them….the rest of the world….not so much…

  • m-dasher

    stopped watching at “burrito”……..MAC is a tool.

    but hey, at least he didnt whip it at any steel plates this time……

    • AC97

      At least he’s not Sootch “I had a negligent discharge with a CZ 75 during a review and put it in a video titled ‘Gun accidents and malfunctions’ (which I later removed) and shot the hood of my truck, which I may-or-may-not have done for publicity”.

      Also, the way he praises everything he ever reviews…

      “Stay strong, eat your vegetables, always wipe front-to-back, never trust the smell test”. – A random commenter mocking Sootch00

  • Graham2

    The only thing Beretta did as far as designing this pistol is concerned was sticking their trademark open slide on a Walther P38! A Browning Hi Power style mag stuffed in the mag well completed the job.

    • AC97

      Doesn’t the P38 already kinda have an open slide?

      • Graham2

        Of course it does but Beretta like their slides all the way to the muzzle, with the upper part of the slide cut away all along the top- hence me calling it Beretta’s trademark open slide.

    • Reinhard Spördenstein

      P.38 has dual recoil springs, overly complicated loaded chamber indicator, less safe decocker and overly complex disassembly lever. And much much worse DA pull and a rear sight that cannot be windage-adjusted. Even the locking block is simpler. 92 is very much a different design.

  • valorius

    I personally feel the M10/11 is a much better sidearm.

  • Karl Palmer

    No mention of the SB model?