NEW: Leupold “Tracker Thermal Viewer”

Tracker Thermal Viewer

Leupold has come up with a new, innovative tool to help you recover your game. The new LTO – Tracker Thermal Viewer is a thermal observation optic that can be used to find downed game or observe prospective trophies while on your hunt.

This is not an optic that you can mount to a firearm as desirable as that idea may be. This is meant to be a standalone optic used for surveying your hunting area or to pursue downed or injured game.

You have a 1.22″ diameter viewing lens with your choice of 6 different color modes. This thermal optic can be used at distances up to 600 yards. More importantly, it can be used at night as well as during the day whether its open prairie or dense forest terrain. I know this could have come in handy for me on several previous hunts when you are tracking a blood trail in the dark.

The one downside I see is its operating temperature range. I personally hail from the gloriously, tropical state of Minnesota where it routinely dips to -20 degrees Fahrenheit every winter. For us hardcore varmint hunters, you may need to store this tight to your chest so it does not get too cold.

The Leupold Tracker Thermal Viewer will prospectively be available near the end of November for consumers. It may miss a lot of state’s deer openers, but it will hopefully still find use for late-season deer hunts. Many people who do winter varmint hunting for coyote and fox could find this tool very useful also.

The Leupold Tracker Thermal Viewer’s complete specification sheet can be viewed below.

Tracker Thermal Viewer



Hello everyone! The outdoors, Crossfit, and anything firearm related have always been my passions. I’ve been a guest writer for Sierra Bullets, am a Smith & Wesson Armorer, reloader, and have an addiction to classic S&W and Colt revolvers. Be sure to visit TFB frequently and keep your magazines full, my friends!


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  • Spencerhut

    That looks useful. Hopefully they price it where many people will be able to afford it. Oh wait it’s a USA made Leupold, it will be expensive.

    • AndyHasky

      MSRP is right there in the graphic…

      for thermal imaging it’s not terrible

      • PK

        For Leupold quality, for a thermal device, that’s incredibly reasonable.

      • Spencerhut

        Looked twice and still missed it. Fail.

      • flyingburgers

        It’s the same detector as the Seek Thermal, which has a street price of $200. They’re making some money.

        • David Harmon

          Except it doesn’t require me to carry my homing device to use it.

          • flyingburgers

            Still, the high frame rate Seek all-in-one is $469 MSRP.

          • David Harmon

            I see that now. It hadn’t been released the last time I checked them out.

            I’ll wait for the reviews of the Leu.

        • AndyHasky

          That’s apples to oranges, the seek doesn’t have a camera and battery, it attaches to your phone. A more applicable comparison is to the seek reveal which has a built in screen and battery, and it’s $400. The build quality on that doesn’t come close to this, is that worth 400 more dollars? Probably not for most people. Also I owned the seek you put on your phone and it sucks, the FLIR 2.0 is miles ahead of it, FYI.

    • Tiru Maru

      I read somewhere MSRP is around $850.

  • Dickie

    About $800

    • QuadGMoto

      That puts it reasonably in line with a similar system from FLIR which has slightly lower resolution, a lower claimed distance, and costs $600.

    • Peeholestinger

      MSRP of $874.99 so real world price will probably be ~$700.

  • Drew Coleman

    I wonder if this is going to be legal in some places. Alabama, for instance, bans you from hunting with NVG or thermals, but I am not sure if that only applies to gun mounted optics or if it means you are not allowed to use them at all.

    • QuadGMoto

      Pennsylvania has a general restriction on electronic devices used during hunting, with enumerated exceptions (certain callers, lights on arrows/bolts to make them easy to find, radios/cell phones with restriction on use, rangefinders, and hearing protection). Unfortunately, this one doesn’t fall into the listed exceptions, not even for tracking after the shoot.

    • El Duderino

      I believe WA has the same restrictions.

    • Carter

      Are you sure you can’t use NVG or thermals in Alabama?

      • Drew Coleman

        Yup – I checked on it last season.

  • jonjon7465

    I wonder if you can mount it in front of an optic?

    • PK

      Very unlikely that it would survive recoil for long, it’s designed to be handheld.

      • Peeholestinger

        I’ve heard it has a 30mm tube so you could mount it. There must be some legal reason they aren’t advertising it as gun-mountable.

  • flyingburgers

    The weird 206×156 array size means the sensor came from Raytheon. I was under the understanding that Seek Thermal had an exclusive license for consumer uses of the technology; they may be involved in this somehow.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      Worse yet that it’s upscaled to a resolution it isn’t. Jokes all around here.

  • JumpIf NotZero

    240×204 @ 30hz

    Nope.

  • David Harmon

    That is pretty affordable for a thermal optic. I like it.

  • flyingburgers

    the 15 FPS FastFrame makes it ITAR anyway.

  • Keiichi

    Wonder what it weighs… if it’s under a pound, it’d be worth looking into… heavier than that, meh…. then again, I’m a bit of a weight snob.

  • Khall41

    I have a thermal eye X200xp. But it is a lot bigger than this Leupold. Will the leupold quality be as good as the Thermal eye?