Glock 35 Exploded

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Cowboy Guns posted this on their Facebook Page. Their buddy had a squib in his KKM barrel. According to Cowboy Guns, Glock will fix the gun for $225 and KKM will replace the barrel. Not sure if this was with reloads or factory ammo. However it is very nice that Glock and KKM are willing to help out the owner. Pretty interesting malfunction. As you can see the pressure took the path of least resistance. It blew the barrel up and through the port in the slide.

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Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • Joseph Goins

    I wonder if there was any damage to the frame since the article said that Glock will fix the gun.

    • Black Dots

      Judging by the angle of the slide, I’m guessing that at least the rear rails are toast.

      • Gregory

        Very little can be salvaged from the gun. All of the major components are destroyed.

        • PK

          From a liability standpoint, nothing should be used. If that gets sent wholly to Glock, they won’t be sending any portion back except the serial number on a new frame.

    • One of the pics shows a crack in the frame on the right side just behind the trigger guard.

      I think Glock and KKM are being nice. Damage like this from a squib load is operator error.

      • Joseph Goins

        Do you mean the mag release? That’s a design feature, not a crack.

    • raz-0

      At least since I have been competing, from the folks I have seen warranty something along these lines, the “fix” is a certificate fro a new firearm.

      • Joseph Goins

        That would make sense.

    • PersonCommenting

      I am honestly surprised they are fixing anything. The gun is modified. I guess he is paying for it though.

      • Joseph Goins

        Glock, KKM, the ammo company — no one should pay a dime to fix this gun. In law, there is something called contributory negligence. Essentially: a plaintiff did something stupid that was a contributing factor in an tort claim. It is important to this case because of what the user did.

        He fired a round that (quite presumably given my experience with squibs) didn’t sound right, feel right, or recoil right. At that point, he should have stopped shooting altogether in order to disassemble his gun. He would have found out that he had a barrel obstruction that needed to be cleared prior to firing.

        (Than again, their insurances are likely to be footing the minimal bill which will be at least 40x less than the cost of going to trial.)

        • PersonCommenting

          It isnt that easy if you are shooting quickly.

          • Joseph Goins

            That’s a risk the shooter assumes.

          • PersonCommenting

            Youre the one talking about laws and such when your last comment “that is the risk the shooter assumes” is all ya had to say.

          • PersonCommenting

            All I was saying is the guy was lucky he bought from a good company. Its a crappy situation but thats the risk we take.

        • PersonCommenting

          Also where did it say he was going to sue? KKM just did it for good publicity.

          • Joseph Goins

            “Also where did it say he was going to sue? “

            Where did I say he was going to sue?

        • Why bother submitting the claim to insurance, unless there is an injury the deductible is likely much more than the cost to fix with plastic guns.

          And a slick lawyer will get a professional shooter on the stand to testify that sometimes it is hard to tell when you have a squib when you are shooting faster. The one time I had a squib (with commercial ammo no less) the RO stopping it was the only thing preventing me from firing the next round.

          If an ammo company is involved it is simply better for them to absorb the cost of fixing along with the likely minor medical bills than to fight it out in court in a case that they will likely lose.

          Glock and KKM are doing the repairs gratis for good will reasons.

  • Jim N Jenna SK

    All these Kabooms I am seeing on TFB lately are reminding me to put on eye pro everytime..

    • BattleshipGrey

      During quals last week I handed a co-worker eye pro with the last kaboom post fresh in my mind. He was going to blow it off til I told him factory ammo is known to explode on occasion. He had no clue.

    • Joseph Goins

      What it makes me think of is how dangerous both factory loads and reloads are when the people responsible for them fail to adequately perform QA/QI/QC checks.

    • PK

      A combination of factors is leading to hearing about them more often. Better social media, everyone carries a camera around, more new gun owners, all of that contributes to hearing about these incidents when they inevitably occur.

      Anything that reminds you to wear eyepro and earpro every single time can at least in some small way be a good thing, though!

      • Kurt Ingalls

        Well said, PK….well said!!!! 🙂

      • Gary Kirk

        That, and apparently 300 blackout is more widely available now…

        • PK

          We’d see more problems with that sort of screwup if more platforms had two or more calibers where the only difference is the barrel, and the chamber allows for the larger to fit and fire in the smaller. It’s a very serious issue with some .300BLK loads and was likely overlooked in development.

          • JustAHologram

            20ga and 12ga, a 20ga will go through the camber of a 12ga but not go all the way through the barrel

          • PK

            That’s a pretty good point, shotgun sets with both 12ga and 20ga barrels have the same issue. So with the introduction of .300BLK, we saw a problem first encountered what, a century or more ago? It just seems strange.

          • JustAHologram

            That’s why all 20ga shells are yellow, you can quickly identify them and know not to put them in a 12ga not that it would stop idiots.

          • Rooftop Voter

            This has not been “sailor proofed.”

          • JustAHologram

            It can be by simply sticking with 12ga

    • Bill

      Eye pro is mandatory, all the time, every time, anywhere.

      • know of any good prescription eye pro?

        • PK

          I buy Zenni Optical safety goggles with prescription glasses built in. They’re something around $30 so when they get scratched up in the shop I just get a new pair. The downside is that only single-focus lenses are offered.

        • Bill

          No, I don’t, dammit. Every lens insert or mail-ordered set I’ve tried hasn’t worked out. I just make sure that my corrective lenses are made out of impact resistant material and add side shields from an industrial safety place.

        • Whiskey

          I bought a pair of Wiley X shades, that are transition lenses. They work for my eyepro and vision at the same time, day or night. Well worth the money, especially if you have a good VSP. Got them for 85 bucks as copay.

      • Jim N Jenna SK

        Which is why it is a great reminder. I wear glasses and it’s hard to get most eye pros to work with them. This reason alone is why I forget to bring them sometimes.

    • Major Tom

      I’m starting to think I’m going to need to get off my bum and finally refurbish my M1 Combat Helmet and start wearing it full time. With all these out of battery firings, gunsplosions and people firing at random hardware anymore, I oughta just start going the whole 9 yards. Ear pro, eye pro, helmet, maybe even a plate carrier vest.

      And this is when I’m not carrying or using a weapon.

      • PK

        Joking aside, I sometimes wear a helmet, goggles, face shield, ear plugs, earmuffs, and soft armor to catch possible fragments, when testing completely new designs… even when I’m off somewhere hiding behind a concrete wall, string in my hand leading to the test rig. I figure you only have to screw up once to be thankful for the safety precautions.

    • Harry’s Holsters

      Last training class I was at their were a ton of problems with ammo. One set of reloads was really bad but PMC, Blazer Remington UMC, Winchester white box and other all had a ton of failures to ignite from bad primers. I also have had the opportunity to personally speaks with people that have both taught or attended training for over 10 years and they said there are more ammo problems than ever before. I’ve also seen a ton of these reports online.

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    Fix?
    Id prefer a new one, thanks.

    • iksnilol

      You’d still be stuck with a Glock tho. 🙁

      • AC97

        But, but, muh glawk fotay…

        • iksnilol

          Problem solvah, right here.

          • AC97

            On a serious note, speaking as someone who has a Glock 19, I’m fully aware that it’s overrated.

          • iksnilol

            But hey, as much as I like to hate on ’em; it works for ya, and if it does then nothing can nor should change that.

          • PK

            You have to be a real profeshnul to use that gat, tho.

          • iksnilol

            No offense, but if I’m using a Glock then all bets are off. I will most likely beat your head in with a tire iron then… I mean, if I’m degrading myself to ghetto levels might as well do the full monty then.

          • PK

            You do you, fam.

          • iksnilol

            *sags panta*

            AAAY, BOO, YOU GOT IT FAM. IT’S GONE BE LIT!

      • TheNotoriousIUD

        Remind me again why people hate Glocks….?

        • iksnilol

          Mediocre, slightly high price considering how much needs to be changed out/modified.

          Like, it’s neat that everything can be changed… less neat when basically everything has to be changed.

          • TheNotoriousIUD

            Meh.
            Mine have all been reliable and accurate.

          • iksnilol

            Well, I grew up with precision firearms and MGs. A Glock is neither.

            But yeah, if you just need a platform to tinker with or something to plug whoever is giving you trouble a Glock works fine.

          • PK

            What about the G18? Precision MG, obviously, right?

            I own a bunch of Glocks, and I agree with you. They’re boring and generic, but they work and I can get parts and mags just about anywhere.

          • iksnilol

            Besides, cultures are different. For you all buying a gun is almost like buying a t-shirt. You got plenty for different occasions and tastes. For me? Buying a gun is like buying leather shoes, a jacket or glasses: it’s gonna be used for a while and I want something that’s good and comfortable (still somewhat economic, because I’m not made of money and I believe quality can be gotten without money dumping).

          • PK

            Incredibly true and often overlooked by firearms enthusiasts in the USA! We’re fortunate to be able to own what we want with very little restriction on the exact number or caliber owned. If I were limited to a certain number of firearms overall, it would have changed almost all of my purchases.

          • 40mmCattleDog

            Boring relaibility must be “bad” to some people. Really though, glocks are reliable, parts are available, and they have a proven track record. Almost all negative glock comments go along the line of “its boring, its blocky, it doesnt look good.” Which is fine, different tastes make this world a vibrant and unique place, but is just that , taste, when it comes down to it you need a functional piece not a pretty one. One man’s opinion.

          • Kivaari

            My issue Glock made it to 30,000 rounds with only the action spring and guide being replaced because it was recommended. Not that it ever failed. Except for adding a 3.5# connector we didn’t need to do anything to our Glocks. Just order them with night sights already installed.

          • TDog

            I wouldn’t say they were mediocre. I’ve never had any issues with them and although I don’t like the aesthetics of them, they are reliable.

        • PK

          Because they’re boring. They’re a generic handgun, widespread, and just about everyone is familiar with them. Reliable, functional, the Honda Civic of firearms.

          Some people like exciting guns, nothing wrong with that. The G19 is probably the most common carry piece in the USA, but that doesn’t make it exciting.

          • TheNotoriousIUD

            I dont need it to be exciting.
            Just need it to work like any other tool.

          • PK

            Exactly why I own a bunch of different models.

          • PersonCommenting

            Yeah but you could say the same about an M&P which has to be up there in popularity with LEOs and concealed carriers.

          • retfed

            But they weren’t boring when they first came out. And they were the first successful polymer striker-fired pistol in the world. (The Steyr and some others weren’t commercial successes.)
            I remember seeing my first Glock 17 in a gun store around 1987. I said, “It’s ugly! There’s no hammer! How can you tell when it’s cocked?” The guy said, “Shoot it.”
            I bought my first Glock, a 17, in 1989 and carried it for 10 years on the job, until my agency went all .40 and I was issued a nice non-Glock .40.
            Glock is the (nearly) original. Saying it’s boring because there are so many similar pistols is like saying the Wright Flyer is boring because we have so many different airplanes today. And unlike the Wright Flyer, the Glock is still viablle.

        • Joseph Goins

          “Remind me again why people hate Glocks…. ?”

          Glock is like Dave Matthews. I could never hate him as much as I hate his fans. (And I live in the heart of DMB country: central Virginia.)

        • RocketScientist

          I can’t speak for anyone else but myself. But for ME, and at least my few closest friends who talk about gun stuff, its not that any of us hate, or even mildly dislike, GLOCKs. In fact I recognize that its a reasonably accurate super reliable very funcitonal peice of equipment, with a lot of advantages (popularity, modularity, wide range of guns/sizes/chamberings, simple manual of arms, etc). I can respect the engineering and functionality behind GLOCKs. But I doubt I’ll ever own more than one (none yet, but have had my eye on a 10mm model for awhile). It’s like a Honda Accord. I can definitely see why they’re popular, and I can appreciate their strong points. And I certainly don’t “hate” or even dislike an Accord. But odds are I will never own one. For me, in any scenario in which “GLOCK” is a potential solution, there are other options that do it better, look better, feel better, or all those. I have the means to pay a little more for things that matter to me, and I’d rather drive something with some style or performance over an Accord. I think a lot of folks come from the same place. The only thing that annoys me is the vocal minority of GLOCK advocates who insist on trying to convince you why everything that’s not a GLOCK sucks and why you’re wrong for not having your entire pistol collection consist of GLOCK 19s.

          • TheNotoriousIUD

            Thats all cool. I just dont understand the hate.
            I have a wide variety of weapons and the only ones that have never malfunctioned are my Glocks.

          • Gary Kirk

            Put in race terms.. Glocks are 5.0 mustang, affordable, decent for factory, ubiquitous, and great aftermarket.. But if “perfection” is your slogan, then why the major aftermarket support?? In this regard, 1911s are the chevy camaro.. So a brand hatred insues instead of everyone just enjoying the hobby, with a bit of good natured ribbing here and there..

      • Joel

        My gunsmith loves it when people buy new M1911s. His kid is almost college age.

        • iksnilol

          Who mentioned 1911s?

          Primitives, the lot of you, I’ve ascended from such petty choices like Glock and 1911.

        • PK

          People complaining, serious or not, about Glocks are unlikely to find a century old, heavy, low capacity design any better.

          Personally, I like the subcompact phased plasma pistol.

      • Black Dots

        Glock brand Glawk go bang when need to. Not pretty, but work good. Me use when need go bang.

      • Hokum

        What’s your pistol of choice, iksnilol?

        • iksnilol

          I’d like to get a (most likely used) CZ 75 (legally at that :O )here in Norway. But in Bosnia I use a Tokarev, I like the cartridge and it feels classy (especially due to being thin and easy to carry under nicer clothes).

          • PK

            Tokarev sure did 1911 right. I find it funny that you find that classier than a Glock, TT33s are seen as cheap junky surplus here. Personally I love them – a high velocity cartridge, unitary FCG, and very interesting appearance.

          • iksnilol

            Eh, probably won’t want it. I mean, have you priced FK 7.5mm ammo lately? Neither have I, I would if it was actually available.

          • PK

            I’m already saving up for the gun and loading dies. I haven’t been excited about a new handgun in a long time, but the recoil compensation and super high velocity for a handgun round both have me very interested. If I can set up with some brass, bullets, dies, a couple of magazines, and the pistol for under $5,000 total I’ll be thrilled.

          • iksnilol

            Your budget and interest is higher than mine.

            I can respect that.

          • PK

            My budget isn’t so much higher as my priorities are likely different. I’m happy enough to live simply and deal with only the essentials for half a year just to save up for this one handgun. It’s that interesting to me, and I suspect it won’t be offered for especially long if it’s too expensive.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, your budget is still way higher than mine. I live bare bones by default and work weekends at a gas station (am a student).

            I maybe earn (after bills and whatnot) the equivalent of 400-500 USD. Per month that is.

    • Sianmink

      $225 is a bit over Glock’s cost to for an entire pistol, so pretty much it’ll be new.

      • Richard

        At least they didn’t say pound sand because of the aftermarket barrel.

    • PK

      “Fix” as in transfer the serial number to a new frame, I bet.

      • Dakota Raduenz

        No Glock fan, but in some states that’s a fix worth more than most Glocks would ever sell for. I hope that’s their “customary” way of fixing, especially for CA, NJ, etc.

        • PK

          That’s practically every large manufacturer’s way of fixing every firearm if the frame or receiver has been damaged due to catastrophic failure. It’s legal as a marking variance so long as the old frame is documented and destroyed, it removes liability issues from reusing suspect parts, and honestly it’s cheap enough to do.

  • Anonymoose

    At least he still has all of his fingers, right?

    • PK

      I would expect so, yes.

  • Andrew Miller

    Squib loads share the pants off me, and it’s one reason I hesitate to ever load my own stuff.

    • Shane

      It just requires a lot of patience and diligence. Then checking and rechecking your work. The main thing is to never shoot someone else’s reloads. You don’t know if they are as careful as you are in reloading.

    • Anonymoose

      I had 3 dud primers in a row out of a box Federal 12 gauge this weekend. Factory ammo can suck too (especially if it’s Russian or Brazilian).

      • Porty1119

        I’ve had borderline-dangerous factory ammo that gave major pressure signs. Reloads done by a skilled and careful individual are going to be a lot safer and more consistent.

        • ostiariusalpha

          Even correctly made ammunition can be tricky. The Hornady Superformance is great in a bolt gun, but can be a little too energetic for a semi-auto.

  • codfilet

    will this be a 100+ comment thread,too?

    • AC97

      If we had some moronic Russian troll arguing that their “heat-treated steel” pistol won’t explode, certainly.

      • Joseph Goins

        But hey…his Makarov only costs $350.

  • Sianmink

    I’m guessing the front sight is somewhere in orbit.

    • Gary Kirk

      Or in the orbital bone of someone..

  • RSG

    Wrap your head around what kind of pressure is required to tear and bend that kind of steel.

    • Anonymoose

      60-70k psi?

    • PK

      Less than you’d expect. Pistol barrels and slides are remarkably thin.

      • George

        Also hard to tell without knowing if the barrel is 4140 annealed or normalized after forging (or something in between).

        Also, separately, has anyone looked at bullet on bullet deformation and hydrostatic shock in squib round kabooms? Or is the mechanism more adiabatic compression of the air column between the bullets?

        • PK

          The exact mechanism of failure varies in different cases, but this is a clear example of “the front fell off”.

          Joking aside, without examining it there’s no easy way to guess the mode of failure. A shot in the dark answer is the subsequent round experienced a spike of pressure when the total projectile mass doubled near the end of the barrel, causing a spike in burn rate, causing massive overpressure in the barrel itself, plus the inertia of the squib plugging the barrel, plus the shock of the fired round hitting the squib and greatly increasing both friction and managing to place extra strain on the barrel wall at that point…

          Basically, something like this fails in a lot of ways simultaneously. What exactly failed first is never easy to say, as when one issue arises, things fail quickly.

          • George

            I don’t know about burn rate; assuming the squib bullet stopped near the mid-front of the rupture then burn should have been largely over. And even if it was not, pressure wave sonic propogation back up the barrel as the projectile abruptly slows is going to be into a roughly sonic flow downbarrel…

            However, this is me guessin from other explosives engineering and physics and thermodynamics, I Am Not An Internal Ballistician.

            I’m having a curious clever idea about a Squib Trap where you intentionally overbore a bit down the barrel and then tighten down with a second forcing cone, and at that point also notch the barrel a bit. The idea is to leave the squib at a known point if it’s primer only, at a point you can controlledly smoothly detach the end of the barrel and let it travel downrange and maybe put vents or blowout ports in the slide there to avoid the slide grenading. Will wreck the barrel for sure and possibly slide (possibly not) but might enhance user safety.

          • PK

            You might be surprised how long (relatively speaking) powders in handguns burn. They’re fast, but they’re not so fast that gas generation has stopped prior to the projectile exiting! I do see what you’re saying as far as the effect of a column of air being compressed and shattering the barrel that way, but until the second projectile hit the base of the first, I doubt there was enough of a seal to cause issues. The bore of a firearm is not gas tight, so it’s like trying to shovel with a colander.

            Your idea sounds like a lot of work for a mode of failure so rare, but if you were to develop it, show it worked to prevent death/injury, patented it, and then floated the idea to the attorneys for gun companies, you might see your idea adopted. I understand the general concept of what you’re saying, but my inner engineer is screaming about the futility of planning around such an uncommon failure.

  • Joel

    1. Looks like a squib. Back on soapbox: this is what is wrong with tap-rack-bang. It can be tap-rack-boom. But everyone teaches it anyway. It’s tacticool and the bearded dudes do it.

    2. I suspect that a CHF barrel is stronger than an aftermarket stainless barrel, in this regard. Not sure if the difference would have made a difference in this instance.

    • Joseph Goins

      It that is what you think everyone teaches for tap-rack-bang, then you need to expand your horizons and learn from someone who knows what he’s doing.

    • TW

      Ja but when u have one gun in a fight. It goes down what do u think to do next. Tell the shooter stop so I can disassemble my gun before I start shooting again

      • PK

        Pull out the backup gun and worry about the primary later?

        • TW

          But how many always carry a primary, let alone a backup.

          • PK

            Everyone who is an oper7+1er.

      • Joel

        For average Joe, chance of encountering squib >> chance of being in gunfight and having jam.

  • Billy bob

    Should have gone with a Hi Point, they’d have fixed it for free.

  • Renato H. M. de Oliveira

    A few days ago a (non-) smart guy put 9mm and. 40 alternatively in his mag.

    The kaboom did remember this one.

    • Sixmile John

      BINGO!

  • Openmindednotangry

    That’s why we wear eye pro

  • Sixmile John

    To ensure a long and healthy life, clean and feed your children a balanced diet.

  • gunsandrockets

    So, a different type of .40 caliber Glock kaboom, to mix things up, eh?

  • Nathan Means

    My gun just exploded in my hands! Quick let me take a selfie.

    • DIR911911 .

      there is not one “selfie” in the pictures above , it goes “My gun just exploded in my hands! Quick let me count my fingers and change my drawers”

  • Nicholas C

    Nice and classy thanks. Look at the picture, if the slide was closed off, the piece of barrel would not be sticking out trying to hitch hike.

  • Random Disable Person

    One thing I haven’t seen thrown out about the company’s possible logic for the willingness to replace/repair the item, is that the “KABOOM” in the wild and the results give the makers a chance to study possible defects or weaknesses in the designs, products, metal/polymer run…

    So why it may be good will, there is still scientific R&D value in the damaged product. You can make things fail in the lab and every way is often controlled and with test models. This is random from the line parts that went through a catastrophic failure with vasribles, there is very useful safety data to be gained. For the company and gun owners. Whether they shoot ever week or maybe once ever 1-2 years.

    Every see the reports from say NASA or the FAA going over an accident? Even the Mountaineering Societies list the deaths and/or injuries of expeditions and reasons why things went wrong. The members don’t join because they want morbid material but that data gained improves everyone’s chances and risks assessments.

    *insert* the “.40 cal hate” below here…

    • PK

      Free destructive testing may or may not be part of the attraction to getting the ruined example back, yes. Seeing where and how things fail is the first step toward preventing the exact same mode of failure in the future.

  • PK

    The barrel was swelling upon the pressure spike, and subsequently sheared and bent through the path of least resistance.

  • DIR911911 .

    that might be enough for a change of underwear if that happened in my hand

  • Bob

    is that a stainless steel barrel? It looks really very GRAINY at the break!
    Could it have been improperly heat treated?
    There USED to be (might still be there) the HK UPS UNOFFICIAL page where they showed them putting a squib in the middle of the barrel and sending a full house load up after it.
    Only result was that it “ringed” the barrel. No other damage.

  • Ski

    No mention of the ammo that caused the squib?

    Glock/KKM didn’t cause the kaboom, so it’s gracious of them to repair/replace the equipment.

  • TeaVice

    Buying a grenade and complaining when it does what it was designed to do.

    REEEEEEEEEE

  • WELLS SHANE

    IT COULD BE BAD BARREL.SEEN THEM CRACK WHEN I WAS IN ARMY.