This collection of revolvers belongs to @ahare19 on Instagram. This is what he posted:

I promised a Colt wheel this week, here is a few of my Colt originals and reproductions. Can you name them all??!

That is quite a collection. It seems he is a revolver enthusiast and if this is just his collection of Colts and reproductions, I wonder what else he has?



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  • ostiariusalpha

    *incoherent slobbering*

  • Jolly

    Uhmmm… I’ve got A wheel gun. Does that count?

  • Anonymoose

    Nope, but I’m pretty sure there’s a Paterson, a couple Walkers, a Dragoon, some Navies (’51 and ’61), at least one ’49 Pocket, a couple 1860 Armies, an 1877, a bunch of conversions, 2 SAAs, and what appears to be a Ruger Blackhawk (top right).

    • ostiariusalpha

      That Ruger is an old model Vaquero, basically a Blackhawk frame that has been machined to resemble the shape of the SAA.

      • Anonymoose

        What tipped me off was the hammer, grip medallions, stainless finish, and just being all-around chunkier. Correct me if I’m wrong, but wasn’t the main difference between the old Blackhawks and old Vaqueros the adjustable sight? The newer Vaqueros are slimmed down to be more like an SAA, but the old ones could take “Ruger-only” .44s and .45s.

        • ostiariusalpha

          The Blackhawk has gone through several model redesigns over the decades, but a lot of the older Blackhawks have a one-piece aluminum alloy grip frame, whereas the Vaquero always used a one-piece steel grip frame. The SAA has a two-piece grip frame, I believe.

    • Harry’s Holsters

      I wish there were more conversion guns on the market. Those are incredible.

  • A bearded being from beyond ti

    What’s that big ol’ revolver with the silver-ish color on the top called? The one pointing inwards toward the little revolver?

    • ostiariusalpha

      Eh, just looks like your average, everyday caplock Colt Walker.

  • John

    Tuco: “Revolvers.”

    Shop owner: “Revolvers.”

    *Tuco shoves the entire collection off the table*

    Tuco: “REVOLVERS!”

    Shop owner: “Here’s where I keep the best ones.”

  • Marcus D.

    The one at the top is a 62 Pocket Police. There’s another at 2:30, and a 62 Pocket Navy at 9 with a .44 cal 61 just below it, and “Reb” (brassy) just below that, also in .44. There are a couple of open tops at the bottom at 6:30 and 7, but I don’t recognize the silver gun between them and the brassy. The one at 6 is a clone stainless 61. To its right is Richards-Mason conversion in a (nonoriginal) brass frame. Continuing counter clockwise there is an 1873 SAA, followed by 3 (I think-picture is not clear enough) 1861 Armies. Above that is an 1862 Pocket Police, and then an 1851, followed by a Dragoon. Then another pocket pistol, not sure which one. Ruger upper right hand corner, a 51 “Sheriff’s Model” in the lower right corner. Upper left looks like a Uberti 1873 in .45. I am not sure about the lower left, other than that it is a 51 cartridge conversion, probably an Open Top. The gun at the bottom looks like an original Colt, but I don’t know if the “Thunderer” configuration is original or not. I also suspect that it is a .38 and is double action.
    How’d I do?

    • ostiariusalpha

      Not shabby. The open top at 7:00 (unblued) is an 1860 Richards-Mason conversion, I believe. And the blued cylinder & barrel next to it at 6:30 is an 1861 Richards-Mason conversion. Colt was desperate to get into the metallic cartridge market after S&W’s bored-through cylinder patent expired, and the conversions were an attempt to keep the company from financial ruin till the 1873 was developed.

  • nick

    great collection ! I’m an 1858 Remington man myself, but I do appreciate the variety of these shooters , well done !