Austrian Ritter & Stark introduces SX-1

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Ritter & Stark is a newly formed firearms manufacturing company in southern Austria. At the recent AUSA 2016, the company unveiled their flagship product, the SX-1 Modular Tactical Rifle (MTR). The rifle is an Austrian take on the PSR style rifles that are currently sweeping the tactical precision long gun world. By that I mean a convertible barrel system from .308 Win, .300 Win Mag, and .338 Lapua, in addition to having a folding buttstock and modular components.

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However what this rifle has that others in the category don’t are a number of innovating features. The buttstock appears to have an AR buffer tube and AR pistol grip, so end users can accessorize their rifles with AR products when it comes to these components. The trigger can be replaced with any Remington 700 trigger, in addition to the bolt itself having some neat options more akin to a 19th Century Mauser rifle than a modern tactical one. It has a Fire position, a Safety position, and a Lock position, all from a lever at the rear of the bolt. The magazine well can be changed out to accommodate various other magazines and can even be custom ordered (I assume it is injection molded polymer, or 3D Printed somehow, to make it customizable). But most innovative in my opinion is the picatinny rail section that is bolted to the barrel. This section stays with the barrel between conversions or disassembly, in addition to any scope that is on it as well. The action, stock, and handguards are simple to disassemble.

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The companies promotional video is very well put together and quite informative about the design. It looks like they went for maximum effect when it came to showcasing the rifle on their website and in this video.



Miles V

Former Infantry Marine, and currently studying at Indiana University. I’ve written for Small Arms Review and Small Arms Defense Journal, and have had a teenie tiny photo that appeared in GQ. Specifically, I’m very interested in small arms history, development, and Military/LE usage within the Middle East, and Central Asia.

If you want to reach out, let me know about an error I’ve made, something I can add to the post, or just talk guns and how much Grunts love naps, hit me up at miles@tfb.tv


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  • PK

    “However what this rifle has that others in the category don’t are a number of innovating features. The buttstock appears to have an AR buffer tube and AR pistol grip…”

    Sure looks like a twist on the Ruger Precision Rifle, right down to the grip and stock taking AR parts. The ability to fold the stock is nice, but again that’s much as the Ruger is. In regards to those features, I don’t see much innovation.

    Still, it’s a nice looking rifle.

    • Gary Kirk

      Looks an awful lot like an RPR in need of an alignment..

      The changeable barrel thing is nice, but if the scope goes with, now I need three high end scopes for one rifle..

      • FarmerB

        Yeah, but if you’re an operator, you have three different zeros and maybe three different types of scope or NV depending on the caliber? My shooting partner has a TAC-2 set up like this. No re-zeroing involved with a caliber change. And this is not a marketeers “no shift in zero” where it’s claimed to be zero shift if the bullet lands in the same zip code.

      • Dan

        If you’re buying this rifle, I am guessing you have the money to purchase the other caliber barrels as well as some high end glass to put on them. This isn’t a budget rifle like the RPR

    • iksnilol

      How is it a twist on the RPR when literally the only thing it has in common with that contraption is that they accept AR furniture?

      You’re starting to sound like Lance to be honest.

      • Dan

        That and ruger wasn’t the first to do it.

        • iksnilol

          Thank you!

          No offense, but Ruger hasn’t had an original idea in more than 30 years.

  • Mike N.

    The Blaser R8, R93, and Tactical all mount the scope to the barrel (more correctly, a barrel assembly including a barrel extension). It may be unusual here but not in Europe.

    • gusto

      yes in 1993 already

      not only does the scope stays with the barrel, the mounts are quickrelease by nature and return to zero if it stays on the barrel or not

      and of course the barrel returns to zero to

      but to my knowledge blaser is the only factory switch barrel that has the scope go with the barrel

      the mauser, sauer and merkel have return to zero quick mounts thou so it doesn’t matter

  • Rocket-Fiend

    Can’t seem to find the answer elsewhere: the top rail mounted bi-pods. Who manufactures them? Keep seeing them pop up in advertisements, but I haven’t been able to locate the seller

    • Myrdin

      Could be the german Fortmeier Bipod. Steyr and roedale use it aswell.

  • CS

    Any word on the price?

    • toms

      They told me 6K for the .300 win mag and more like 4500 for the .308.
      Its made in austria and designed by former Osiris engineers from Russia.
      Also uses EDM cut rifling which should make it accurate.

      • Vitor Roma

        What EDM stands for?

        • Markus

          Electrical discharge machining, a very fancy, very precise way of cutting metal.

  • John

    If you have to ask how much it is….you can’t afford it.

  • Mike Lashewitz

    Oooh pretty! I want one in a 338 Lapua.