Let’s Go Fishing – Bring Your Suppressed Glock

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Discharging a firearm underwater is loud – very loud. So when a group of divers and spear fisherman took to the waters off the west coast of Florida to do some “fishing”, they quickly decided that they were going to need some suppression to protect their hearing. The blast from their 9mm Glock pistol was painful even for divers positioned a good distance away from the shooter.

As explained in the first video, standard “in air” suppressors aren’t effective under water. Obviously water is a lot more dense than air, so trying to contain the blast of a firearm within a suppressors baffles is not a viable technique for reducing the report under water. With the help and guidance from the guys at Lone Wolf Distributors, makers of barrels and other Glock accessories, these divers devised a very effective technique for under water firearm suppression.

Instead of trying to trap and contain the expanding gases, this Glock muzzle device focuses on slowing and dispersing the blast and shock waves of a discharged firearm. A series of ports in the forward part of the tube pushes water out, while containing the blast in the back part of the tube. The result: a dramatic decrease in noise and pressure.

Lionfish, the target of these crusaders, are an invasive species of fish with no natural predators. They also devastate the natural reef inhabitants. Fishing, traditionally using spears, are really the only way to curb the exploding Lionfish population. Of note is that the divers are using lead-free ammunition, don’t discharge rounds into the living reef and also collect their brass whenever possible. The whole operation seems about as ethical as you can get. Nice job all around.

Every part of this experiment was well researched and explained, so I’m going to give them a pass on the animation depicting the bullet as a complete cartridge case flying through the suppressor. My one criticism: needs more sharks with laser beams!


GLOCK FISHING:


Lone Wolf Distributors – https://www.lonewolfdist.com

208-448-0600

LoneWolf@LoneWolfDist.com



Pete

LE – Science – OSINT.
On a mission to make all of my guns as quiet as possible.
Pete.M@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • Martin Grønsdal

    Wouldn’t it be better to use less violent methods, like a spear?

    • Paulo Marcondes

      Each to his own….

      • Martin Grønsdal

        sarcasm 😉

        • Paulo Marcondes

          Err, I have a really big trouble spotting it in my own language….much less in a foreign one… (not native english typer =] )

    • TVOrZ6dw

      I’m not sure being stabbed with a spear is any less violent than being shot with a bullet. The fish seems dead right away in any case- I don’t think it has a preference.

      • Martin Grønsdal

        well, if you have to eat fish, you can buy it from the grocery store, not having to kill it first?

        same with meat.

        • CommonSense23

          I’m really hoping this is sarcasm.

          • Martin Grønsdal

            look, I am against violence. If I want someone beaten up, I have my man do it for me.

          • Tassiebush

            Haha you got a rise out of me.

          • DIR911911 .

            trollin’, trollin’,trollin’ , keep them on their toes , haha love it

    • mig1nc

      A 17 round speargun… Yes! 🙂

    • Major Tom

      How about we just use some fishing trawlers and just catch every fish in the Lionfish’s invasive range.

      What, bycatch? What’s that? :3

    • Tassiebush

      I’m not sure what you mean by that? You may not be aware but not only are they a voracious pest in the Caribbean (Indian ocean fish) but they are also covered in toxic spines making handling a tricky thing. Like a great number of feral pests they are incredibly destructive and the priority is to get rid of as many as possible. Eating would be a secondary and unimportant consideration. From a practical angle of why not spears?Spears in my experience can be a bit prone to mutilating your catch once you get it off anyway so shooting the front end off probably isn’t that different but as far as removing a flailing fish from a spear is a bit of a hassle and this delays getting onto your next fish and if that fish happens to have toxic spines as well then shooting it would be vastly preferable.

      • Martin Grønsdal

        my post was a sarcasm.

        Unless one hunting method is profoundly inadequate (causes unnecessary suffering), it is not better, nor worse then any other.

        and sure, the amounts of lion fish should be controlled, however, I doubt it’s possible to tax one specific kind of fish?

    • Okay, ‘fess up– where exactly in the DNC official platform did you copy-paste that sentence from?

      • Martin Grønsdal

        Your next president, whoever she may be, said so.

    • Darren Hruska

      “Guns take no skill! Use a spear! Poor defenseless animal!”
      “What?! You used a spear?! That’s too underpowered! You should have used a gun!”

      In all seriousness, apparently the shock wave/blast from the pistol’s muzzle, alone, does a number to the fish. The bullet is perhaps just icing on top of the cake, really.

      • RA

        I know right? Those poor fish suffering is just terrible. FLM!!!

    • whskee
    • DB

      They do spear them, but the place is LOUSY with them, and they eat EVERYTHING! Groupers, anything that gets near them, and they are quick as hell! Also those spines are poisonous and will ruin your day! The Glock is a lot quicker way to get them and more of them. They aren’t indigenous to the waters that far north, they’re usually down by the keys and south. Now they’re working their way all the way to the panhandle! They also lay lots of eggs every few days so it’s hard to gain on them. They’re neat looking, taste good, but are a real serious problem. TAMPA BAY AREA has some awesome fishing, but these things are eating everything when the local fish are just born, Glock works good!

    • Dynamite works

      • RA

        IDEA!! Use a 22lr pistol to shoot tannerite placed in Lionfish dens. Double whammy! Just have to work out the brain damage problem 1st.

  • Marc

    1:25 100% more bullet per bullet.

    • “I’m gonna get my engineers to invent a combustible lionfish that burns your house down! Underwater!”

  • Major Tom

    We need to utilize from ADS or APS underwater assault rifles to counter the scourge of the Lionfish.

    Either that or the SEAL’s just need to start handing out their underwater pistols they allegedly have.

  • datimes

    Finding water 100 feet deep in Florida can be a real challenge. They must be far off shore.

    • CS

      Depends where you are in the state.

      • datimes

        I’m south so I can’t speak for the northern part of the state. But the Lion fish are here.

    • Old Vet

      It is not rare for 100+ ft. of water here in the panhandle. Look up the Oriskany wreck dive spot.

  • Ambassador Vader

    Great, here comes the ATF under water suppressor law directives.

    • Pete – TFB Writer

      Underwater fingerprint cards?

      Sorry, too soon?

      • Ambassador Vader

        Approval by the local CLEO Life guard.

        • Sasquatch

          You mean the Coast Gaurd.

          • Ambassador Vader

            Well we’ll see when the regulations come out. lol I’m just sick of the 3 day waiting period for scuba tanks.

    • c4v3man

      That’s what I’d like additional information on, the narrator claimed that the “extended barrel/flash suppressor” is just a flash suppressor, and does not reduce the report of the firearms at all, but the final underwater suppressor with the single large chamber supposedly did not reduce the report of the gun “much” in above-water testing. The ATF doesn’t really care whether it’s effective, simply that it’s a suppressor parts involved, which a single chamber muffler would basically be right? As such, I’m assuming this IS treated and licensed as a suppressor by Airborne Arms LLC? I’d like to know what the pressure/sound reduction was in the final production model, since it looks like they had precision mic’s during the testing phase, it’d be nice if they provided those numbers.

      It’s a neat video, I’d imagine the guns wouldn’t be damaged that much if you followed this up with a clean water rinse and a water-displacing ultrasonic oil bath when done. Could be an interesting service to offer divers looking for the next new thing. I wonder how far a 9mm sintered round can travel underwater…

  • JumpIf NotZero

    Yea, I stopped at 30 seconds in when a whole 5.7mm round case and all is being fired from that Walther.

    • Pete – TFB Writer

      Like I said. I gave them a pass. Everything else was awesome.

  • Jordan Snyder

    Is it safe to assume these Glock have the maritime firing pin spring cups?

    • Badwolf

      I think those are not designed for underwater use. It’s to speed up water drainage when you get out of the water.

      • mbrd

        hmm… i thought the maritime cups were for both rapid drainage and submerged firing capability. i got mine from ghost and put them in all my glocks. i’m not an operator operating underwater operationally, i just thought they were cool (and inexpensive).

        • Badwolf

          As far as I know the maritime cups are for rapid drainage only. Typical in-air guns and bullets don’t work well underwater. Notice that you need to be point blank to kill fish. There are guns that are specially designed for underwater use like HK P11 and soviet APS and SPP1.

  • 11b

    Lionfish have no natural predators. Except, of course, the Glock.

    • RA

      S&W, H&K, Colt, ……….

  • gunsandrockets

    So how do they taste?

  • Always wondered why Florida doesn’t organize canned hunts for garbage animals like swamp pythons and lionfish and feral hogs that are not only invasive species but also edible and/or have marketable pelts, but then I remembered that Florida’s state government basically hates the entire human race and wants it to suffer, and now I’m wondering how much money we could rook Cuba into paying for the place before sea level rise puts everything south of EverBank Field underwater.

    • AlDeLarge

      Google “florida python challenge”

  • DIR911911 .

    wonder how well the #4 shot shells from the other article would work out from that range

    • Mazryonh

      The article does say that the divers need to keep track of every bullet they fire, so shot from shotshells would be more difficult to keep track of. Besides, drag underwater is much stronger than drag in air, so those small pellets wouldn’t travel as far as the 9mm bullet would.

  • Jeff Smith
    • Charles Branch

      It isn’t. The general procession and dissipation of gas (and the generated pressure) from the muzzle is depicted well, though. Just as sound waves are transmitted better in the denser fluid (water v. air), so are the pressure waves from explosives. A traveling spear could do more damage to the reef, than the close range 9mm.

  • DanGoodShot

    Here you see a very rear specimen indeed. This is a Glockfish. It uses it’s deafening sound to scare away possible predators and if that doesn’t work it has a heck of a nasty little stinger that comes out of it nose. So remember folks, If your diving around the coral reefs of the West Florida coast, keep an eye out(or ear) for the Glockfish…

  • MarcoPolo

    So, is this an NFA item, or not?

  • Badwolf

    We need immigrantion reform! I’m talking about the lionfish of course.

    • Mazryonh

      There are no border checkpoints under the waves! For invasive/harmful species or otherwise!

      On a more serious note, there are shark nets to keep marine animals out, but those only protect specific beaches, not the open ocean.

  • Paladin

    I wonder why they don’t use .22 caliber? That’s pretty small game. Maybe there’s no lead-free ammo for .22? I wonder if a .22 would need the silencer? Especially a low-velocity .22 short.

  • jcitizen

    You wouldn’t catch me picking on up – even with gloves on – I’ve always understood they are deadly poisonous. They probably act as if they are disinterested because all the other fish are scared of them too – so they have no enemies (but us) to be afraid of. Skunks act friendly some times also, but nothing will touch them, so they are fearless.

  • Mazryonh

    This article makes me wonder if these lionfish hunters ever have to worry about curious sharks attracted to the blood from the dead lionfishes. Or if they have to do anything with the poisonous parts after the lionfishes are shot.

  • Jimmy

    Seems a little confusing to me. How can a Glock fire an unfired rifle cartridge out the end of the suppressor? As shown in the video, over and over?

  • Ranger Rick

    Good job guys, get those fish.

  • RA

    Just curious, if ear plugs/muffs work in air why not under water as well?

  • RA

    Damn! That is an invasion for sure. hate to see them that bad.