Mossberg Lawsuit Against Trigger Companies Suffers Second Rejection In Court


I just received a copy of the second court document which rejects Mossbergs claims a second time. While it indicates this is not a final decision it again calls into question the validity of the patent infringement lawsuit.

I’ve attached the court document below for you review. This time illustrations are included of a Jewell trigger as well as referencing other triggers also with illustrations. Now this is a long document but many have asked we show the entire document which is what I’ve done. Of course you can scroll down to see the rejection and reason for this second rejection.

www.uspto.gov
THIRD PARTY REQUESTER’S CORRESPONDENCE ADDRESS Date: 09/20/2016
HOLLAND & HART LLP
RECEIVED
222 SOUTH MAIN STREET, SUITE 2200
P. O. BOX 11583
SEP 2 6 2016
SALT LAKE CITY, UT 84110
Holland & Hart LLP
EX PARTE REEXAMINATION COMMUNICATION TRANSMITTAL FORM
REEXAMINATION CONTROL NO. : 90013341 and 90013655 are merged.
PATENT NO. : 7293385
ART UNIT : 3993
Enclosed is a copy of the latest communication from the United States Patent and Trademark Office in the above identified ex parte reexamination proceeding (37 CFR 1.550(D).
Where this copy is supplied after the reply by requester, 37 CFR 1.535, or the time for filing a reply has passed, no submission on behalf of the ex parte reexamination requester will be acknowledged or considered (37 CFR 1.550(g)).

UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
United States Patent and Trademark Office
Address: COMMISSIONER FOR PATENTS
P.o Box 1450
Alexandria, Virginia 22313-1450 www„uspio gov
APPLICATION NO FILING DATE FIRST NAMED INVENTOR AITORNEY DOCKET NO. CONFIRMATION NO,
90/013,341
90/013, 655 09/08/2014 7293385 80960.0001 2607
171 DWIGHT ROAD, SUITE 302
LONGMEADOW. MA 01 106-1700 JASTRZAB, JEFFREY R
AR’I’ UNIT PAPER NUMBER
3993
MAIL DATE DELIVERY MODE
27804 7590 09/20/2016 EXAMINER HOLLAND & BONZAGNI, P.C.
09/20/2016 PAPER
Please find below and/or attached an Office communication concerning this application or proceeding.
The time period for reply, if any, is set in the attached communication.
PTOl,-90A (Rev. 04/07)
Office Action in Ex Parte Reexamination Control No.
90/013,341 and 90/013,655 mer ed Patent Under Reexamination
7293385
Examiner
JEFFREY R. JASTRZAB Art Unit
3993 AIA (First Inventor to
File) Status
No
– The MAILING DA TE of this communication appears on the cover sheet with the correspondence address
Responsive to the communication(s) filed on 6/22/16 and 9/1/16 .
A under 37 CFR 1.130(b) was/were filed on
b. O This action is made FINAL.
c. C] A statement under 37 CFR 1.530 has not been received from the patent owner.
A shortened statutory period for response to this action is set to expire 3 month(s) from the mailing date of this letter.
Failure to respond within the period for response will result in termination of the proceeding and issuance of an ex parte reexamination certificate in accordance with this action. 37 CFR 1.550(d). EXTENSIONS OF TIME ARE GOVERNED BY 37 CFR 1.550(c). If the period for response specified above is less than thirty (30) days, a response within the statutory minimum of thirty (30) days will be considered timely.
Part I THE FOLLOWING ATTACHMENT(S) ARE PART OF THIS ACTION:
1. Notice of References Cited by Examiner, PTO-892. 3. [3 Interview Summary, PTO-474.
2. Information Disclosure Statement, PTO/SB/08.
Part Il SUMMARY OF ACTION
Claims 3 5-9 and 11-15 are subject to reexamination,
Claims are not subject to reexamination.
Claims 1 2 and 4 have been canceled in the present reexamination proceeding.
Claims are patentable and/or confirmed.
Claims 3 5-9 and 11-15 are rejected.
Claims are objected to.
The drawings, filed on are acceptable.
The proposed drawing correction, filed on has been (7a) approved (7b)Ü disapproved.
Acknowledgment is made of the priority claim under 35 U.S.C. S 119(a)-(d) or (f).
a) O All b) O Some* None of the certified copies have
I been received.
2 not been received.
3 been filed in Application No.
4 been filed in reexamination Control No.
5 been received by the International Bureau in PCT application No.
See the attached detailed Office action for a list of the certified copies not received.
9. Since the proceeding appears to be in condition for issuance of an ex parte reexamination certificate except for formal matters, prosecution as to the merits is closed in accordance with the practice under Ex parte Quayle, 1935 C.D. 1 1 , 453 0.G. 213.
10. Other:
cc: Requester (if third party requester)

U.S. Patent and Trademark Oific;o
PTOL-466 (Rev. 08-13) Office Action in Ex Parte Reexamination Part of Paper No. 20160914

The present application is being examined under the pre-AA first to invent provisions.
Reexamination
Merger
The subject U.S. 7,293,385 Patent issued on November 13, 2007 and was later confirmed in a prior Ex Pade Reexamination 90/013,200 with a Certificate issued as 7,293,385 Cl confirming patent claims 1-9, canceling claim 10 and adding Claims 11-15.
A second reexamination is pending as Control Number 90/013,341 , filed 9/8/2014, reexamining claims 1-9 and 11-15, of which claims 1, 2 and 4 have been canceled.
A third request, Control Number 90/013,655, calls for reexamination of claims 3, 5-9 and 11-15 of the Cl Certificate. An Order has been issued granting the Request.
Reexamination Control Numbers 90/013,341 and 90/013,655 have been merged, see the Decision of 3/29/2016.
Claim Status
Claims 1, 2, 4 and 10 have been canceled.
Claims 3, 5-9 and 11-15 are currently pending and stand rejected, however a new ground of rejection is presented herein, therefore this Office action is non-Final.
Withdrawn Rejections
The rejection of Claim 15 under 35 U.S.C. 112(b) or 35 U.S.C. 112 (pre-AIA), second paragraph, as being indefinite for failing to particularly point out and distinctly claim the subject matter which the inventor or a joint inventor, or for pre-AIA the applicant regards as the invention is hereby withdrawn as the current amendment obviates the issue presented in the last Office action.
Claim Rejections – 35 USC S 103
The text of those sections of Title 35, U.S. Code not included in this action can be found in a prior Office action.
Claims 5, 6, 8 and 9 are rejected under 35 U.S.C. S 103(a) as being unpatentable over Jewell in view of Bielfeldt, U.S. Patent No. 5,904,132 to Biller and U.S. Patent No. 2,514,981 to Walker et al (Walker), and as further evidenced by the AR-15 Schematics as evidenced by Taiwan Patent No. 409847 to Li.
(Claim 5)
Claim 5 sets forth the recited firearm in a structural manner in combination with the module.
Jewell discloses a firearm (rifle 12). The firearm has a receiver formed in the stock (16) (see Fig. 1). The receiver defines a trigger group receiving area between a first receiver side wall and a second receiver side wall (see Fig. 2). Although Jewell apparently discloses a bolt receiver (not shown, see col. 3, lines 65-68), the term ‘receiver” is interpreted in this reexamination proceeding as being the portion of the firearm that houses the firearm’s operating parts, including the bolt and the trigger group. Accordingly, the receiver in Jewell is the combination of the bolt’s receiver and also the cavity that receives the housing 26. See annotated Figure 1, below.
Each of the first and second receiver side walls includes a first pin receptacle opening, which functions to define a pin support surface. Figure 2 shows the receptacle openings of the firearm supporting a pin (30).
(Fig. 2, with added notation by the Examiner taken from the Reexam Request; Fig 1 without annotation)
PIN RECEPTACLE
OPENINGS
RECECVER
SIDEWALL

Jewell further discloses a module housing (housing 26) located in an operating position in the trigger group receiving area of the firearm (as shown in Figs. 1, 2; see col. 3, lines 64-65).
Jewell additionally discloses a number of trigger group components mounted within the module housing, including an arm lock means (20), a trigger piece (22), and a link mechanism (24) components (see col. 4 lines 1-3; Fig. 1).
(Fig. 4, with added notation taken by the Examiner from the Reexam Request)
IN RECEIVER
Jewell further discloses a first pin receiver positioned in the module housing and aligning with the first pin receptacle openings of the firearm (see Figs. 2, 4). Jewell includes a first pin receiver in the module housing (26), substantially defined by an opening/aperture in each of the housing walls through which a pin (30) passes (see Fig. 3). As shown (see Fig. 2), the pin receiver is positioned so as to align with the first pin receptacle openings of the firearm while the module housing (26) is in the operating position. In this position the first pin receptacle openings of the firearm are to define pin
support surfaces formed in the first receiver side wall and the second receiver side wall.
Jewell further discloses a first module pin mounted in the first pin receiver. As evident in Figure 1, Jewell has a trigger group component (i.e., an arm lock means/arm lock 20) supported in the module housing about the pin (30) which is received in a pin receiver. Also present is a pin-receiving sleeve that receives the pin (30) therein (again see Fig. 1). This is also described by Jewell’s specification (see col. 4, lines 4-5): “The
arm lock means 20 is pivotally mounted to a housing 26 on a sleeve about pin 30 .
This passage would tend to indicate that the sleeve also defines a componentsupporting pin.
Jewell further discloses the following regarding the sleeve being connected (in some manner) to the housing (see col. 6, line 67 — col. 7, line 7):
Even if removal of the trigger assembly 10 is necessary (see FIGS. 1 and 2), removal of the pin 30 allows the entire trigger assembly to be quickly removed from the rifle 12. That is, a sleeve connects the lock arm 20 to the housing 26, the pin 30 passes through the sleeve to connect the housing 26 to the stock 16. The rear portion of the housing 26 is supporting in the stock by a lip. Thus, removal of pin 30 allows removal of the entire trigger assembly 10. (Examiner’s emphasis)
However, it should be noted that Jewell’s Figures 3 and 4, although tending to indicate that pins (30) are physically mounted in the pin receiver openings in the module’s housing wall, fail to show that a pin receiver opening also mounts therein the pinreceiving sleeve. Therefore, even if the unnumbered sleeve itself would reasonably be defined as a module pin, its disclosed location fails to meet (for it) the claim 5 limitation that calls for the first module pin to be mounted in the first pin receiver.
Accordingly, Jewell by itself fails to disclose a first module pin that both (1) has an opening for alignment with the pin receptacle openings of the firearm and (2) is mounted Ina first pin receiver positioned in the module’s housing. Instead, Jewell has a pin (30) mounted in a pin receiver opening (in the housing; see Fig. 4) but not itself having an opening, and Jewell further has an unnumbered sleeve having an alignable opening, which even if it is determined to define a pin, is nonetheless not disclosed as mounted jn a pin receiver (which is positioned in the module housing).
Nonetheless, it is suggested in the trigger mechanism art to make a componentmounting pin hollow that also functions as a bolt. More specifically, Bielfeldt suggests, to one of ordinary skill in the art, to pivotally mount a trigger sear (indicated with the number 21) on a “fixed pin or bolt 27” (see col. 3, lines 52-55), and Bielfeldt’s Figure 1 tends to show that this fixed pin or bolt 27 is hollow. The trigger mechanism includes components 12, 21, 30 located between housing plates (see col. 3, lines 20-23). The description of the mounting element 27 as a “bolt” implies that the element may at least connect the trigger sear (pivotally) to one of the housing plates 10. Moreover, the term “bolt” would tend to suggest that the connection is made by extending it into or through an opening. The term would thus suggest to the artisan that a bolt 27 is mounted in an opening in at least one housing plate 10 (in the Examiner’s opinion).
Moreover, the sear in Bielfeldt is disclosed as being pivotally mounted at one end, and Figures 1 and 2 show the sear being overlapped with one of the housing plates. Thus, the Examiner has not found the argument in the October 16, 2014
Declaration of Charles Olsen, presented by Patent Owner, to be persuasive which has argued that the sear in Bielfeldt is not described as being mounted to a housing plate (paragraph 9), because the artisan would understand from Bielfeldt that the pivotal mounting of the sear is to a housing plate via the bolt.
Requester has cited judicial support for considering that combining “familiar elements according to known methods is likely to be obvious when it does not yield more than predictable results, and that altering the prior art by the mere substitution of one known element in place of another in the field, yields no more than a predictable result (see 9/8/14 Request for Reexamination, p 31). Based on this argument, Requester has argued that substituting the pin or bolt (27) of Bielfeldt for the unnumbered sleeve of Jewell would yield the predictable result of permitting removal the entire trigger assembly (10) of Jewell from the firearm, while managing to retain the arm lock means (20) in a pivotally mounted relationship with the housing (26) even after removal of the pin (30).
Requester has additionally argued that one of ordinary skill in the art would be motivated to replace such a sleeve of Jewell with the “pin or bolt 27” of Bielfeldt, which pivotally mounts a similar component to a similar housing, so as to retain Jewell’s arm lock means (20), the spring (36) and the block (62) (and, possibly, other components) in their assembled order within the housing (26) even after the assembly has been removed from the firearm.
The Examiner agrees. Thus, for these reasons as argued by Requester, it would have been obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art, in view of Bielfeldt, to have replaced the unnumbered sleeve of Jewell with a hollow bolt and, moreover because the replaced hollow element constitutes a bolt, to have connected it (the bolt) to the opening in the housing’s (26) plate.
Additionally, Jewell fails to disclose that the lower extremity of its module housing is located above the lowermost edges of the first and second receiver side walls of the shown firearm’s trigger group receiving area.
Nonetheless, Biller suggests such a feature in relation to a firearm. As argued by
Requester (see 9/8/2014 Request, p 32):
Biller discloses a trigger module (14 — Fig. 2) that has been received in a housing (12) having a lower edge (within the trigger guard). As shown in Figure 1, even the lowest point of the module walls does not protrude below the housing lower edge, which demonstrates that essentially all the lower edge of the module is above the level of the housing edge.
Modifying Jewell to slightly raise the level of the lower edge of the module would have been motivated by a desire to provide added clearance to ensure against unwanted protrusion of the module housing into trigger guard area, for example, due to manufacturing tolerances.
The Examiner agrees. Biller’s positioning and shape of triggering module 14 relative to the edge of its grip housing 12 in the vicinity of the trigger would suggest a desire in Biller to have the lowest portions of the triggering module be above a lowermost edge of the grip housing, so as to avoid protrusion of the triggering module.
Moreover, the reference of Walker teaches a position for a module housing/trigger housing 4 in a bolt-type rifle wherein the lowermost extremity of the housing is above the lowermost edge of the cavity that receives the housing (see Fig. 1). One would appreciate from the structure shown in Walker that such a relative position of the housing produces a benefit of reducing obstruction to a triggers access by the user.
Accordingly, for the reasons as argued by Requester regarding Biller and as indicated herein regarding Walker, it would have been obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art in view of Biller and Walker to modify Jewell for making the position of the module housing in Jewell so that its lowermost extremity will be above the lowermost edges of the side walls of the firearm, for reducing obstruction to the trigger by unwanted protrusion of the module housing.
Accordingly, claim 5 is unpatentable over Jewell in view of Bielfeldt, Biller and
Walker.
(Claim 6)
The limitations in claim 6 essentially call for (1) there to be second pin receptacle openings in the first and second receiver side walls and for the second pin receptacle openings to define pin support surfaces, and (2) there to be a second pin receiver in the module housing that is aligned with the second pin receptacle openings. Jewell fails to include these features because it describes supporting the module housing 26 with only one of the pins 30 (and a lip; see col. 7, lines 2-7). Thus, Jewell only discloses one pin receiver (defined by openings in the walls in the housing for the pin 30) being aligned with pin receptacle openings of the firearm side walls (as seen in Fig. 2) and thus not a second pin receiver that is aligned with second pin receptacle openings in the firearm side walls.
However, regarding a firearm having a bolt (3), the reference of Walker teaches to connect a trigger component/moduie housing (4) in the receiver of a firearm with a pair of pins (14, 15) (see col. 2, lines 37-43) which are also used for pivotal support of trigger group components. Walker therefore essentially teaches, in addition to having a first pin receiver (for pin 14) in a module housing being aligned with a first connecting location in a firearm’s receiver, to additionally provide a second pin receiver (for pin 15) in the module housing, which is aligned with a second connecting location in the firearm. Accordingly, one of ordinary skill would readily appreciate from Walker’s teaching that Jewell could be modified (1) to have the second of Jewell’s pins 30 be modified and used for connecting the module housing 26 in the firearm, (2) to further provide second pin receptacles in the side walls in Jewell’s rifle 12, and (3) to have the second pin receptacles be aligned with the second pin receiver that receives the second pin 30 (shown in Figs. 1 and 4). Achievement of a sturdier installment of the module housing in the stock would constitute a benefit that is achieved from using such a dual connection. Therefore, it would have been obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art to modify Jewell in view of Walker to provide a result that includes a second pin receiver in the module housing 26 being aligned with second pin receptacles openings in the firearm’s side walls.
(Claim 8)
Although the safety mechanism 28 in Jewell is mounted to its module 26, Biller further demonstrates that it is within the ordinary skill in the art to instead mount a safety
(40, including operator knob 71 , pawl 52 and shaft 70 etc.) to a firearm receiver’s side walls and to do this even when the firearm’s trigger assembly is included within a module housing (frame 43, walls 46, 47) in a firearm (spear gun). Accordingly, it would have been obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art in view of Biller to modify the safety mechanism of Jewell so that it would also be accessibly mounted to one of the firearm’s side walls and thus to the receiver for the trigger assembly.
(Claim 9)
The Walker reference demonstrates where a receiver (1) would be that houses the bolt. This would apparently be the type of feature referred to by Jewell when it refers to a receiver (see col. 3, lines 65-68). However, as indicated above, the term ‘received’ in this reexamination prosecution is interpreted to be the part of a firearm that houses the operating parts. This means that the portions of the firearm of Jewell having therein the bolt and the trigger group define the receiver. The upper portion for the bolt in Jewell can be considered as the upper receiver, and the lower portion for the trigger group can be considered as the lower receiver. Accordingly, the limitation in claim 9 per se either is met by Jewell (of the art combination) or further obvious in view of Walker.
Claim 9 therefore does not distinguish the claimed subject matter relative the applied art combination being applied to independent claim 5.
Response to Prior Arguments (90/013,341 – 10/20/15 Response)
As to Claim 5, Patent Owner argues that the portion of the stock housing the trigger components would not be considered a receiver by those of ordinary skill in the art. Walker is cited to establish what those in the art would consider a receiver as well as a Third Declaration of Seth K. Bradbury stating that bolt action rifles have an outer steel sleeve called the receiver.
After careful consideration of all of the evidence, these arguments are not persuasive. The Examiner’s position is that the receiver of Jewell constitutes both the bolt receiving area as well as the trigger component receiving area. While it is recognized that the bolt receiver is a term or art, generally referred to as the receiver generically, the firearm in Jewell nonetheless includes a trigger component receiving area or cavity. The art is fully aware of instances where the upper action of a rifle is considered the upper receiver and the portion that houses the trigger components is considered the lower receiver (e.g. the AR-15 platform as evidenced by the AR-15 Schematics). Here, broadly, the sum of the trigger receiving area and the bolt receiving area can certainly collectively be considered a receiving area or receiver.
Moreover, and possibly more importantly, Jewell’s trigger assembly is not limited to use in a Mauser-type bolt action rifle. Jewell specifically states that the trigger assembly is applicable to other firearms: “(t)he trigger assembly 10 can easily be adapted for use in other types of firearms….” Thus, to the extent those in the art would not have interpreted a bolt action rifle to have upper and lower receiver areas, those having ordinary skill in the art would have understood this teaching to be equally applicable to firearms with specifically designated upper and lower receiving areas, such as the AR-15 platform for the intrinsic benefits making the trigger housing replaceable. Thus, it would have been obvious to have used the Jewell trigger assembly in other firearms, including those with upper and lower receivers, given Jewell’s explicit teaching to do so. Since this may be considered a newly presented position, this rejection has not been made final.
As to Claim 9, Patent Owner offers testimony of Michael McCormick in related litigation to establish that the stock is not a receiver in a bolt action rifle. Additionally, the AR-15 platform is discussed to differentiate a firearm with an upper and lower receiver. As noted above, the trigger receiving area of a firearm can be considered a receiver in the broadest sense, but even if the Mauser-type bolt action rifle stock cannot be considered as having a receiver that includes the trigger housing, given the explicit teaching by Jewell to use the trigger housing in other types of firearms, it would have been obvious to those of ordinary skill in the art to have used that trigger housing in firearms with separate upper and lower receivers as established above.
Response to 6/22116 Arguments and Discussions in the Interview of 8/23/16
Patent Owner continues to assert, via the Bredbury declarations as well as via the in-person interview statements of Mr. Bredbury, that the receiver in Jewell is does not include the trigger receiving area of the stock in the reference. In response, the area below the standard receiver in a bolt action still constitutes a region for receiving the trigger module of Jewell. Thus even if it is not standard industry practice to call this area the trigger receiver, it nonetheless is functionally equivalent to a lower receiver in that it too performs the function of receiving a trigger group. As requested, evidence of such an art recognized interpretation is found by the similar nomenclature in the art of record to Tollinger, who refers to the entire action area, including the trigger receiving area, as the receiver, e.g. at column 4, lines 63-64: “The trigger housing assembly 26 includes a housing 34 removably mounted in the receiver 20”. Tollinger, like Jewell, is not limited to shotguns, but more generally refers to semi-automatic firearms as well. In comparing the trigger receiving area of the subject patent and that of the likes of Jewell and Tollinger, one can readily see that two parallel walls are the minimum that is required to receive a trigger module. Thus, it is maintained that an area of the firearm that receives a trigger assembly can be broadly considered a trigger receiving area or trigger receiver without destroying the intent of Jewell or the accepted terms of the art.
Moreover, the rejection applies to other types of firearms in general as called for by Jewell, including those with lower receivers. Thus the arguments to Jewell’s bolt action example do no reach the latter.
Patent Owner’s argument that the statement in Jewell that the trigger module can be used in “a Mauser, bolt action rifle, it being understood that the trigger assembly can be easily modified for use with other types of firearms” means that the assembly can be used in other types of bolt-action firearms is not persuasive. It is the Examiner’s
position that this statement is more far-reaching to include all types of firearms and that those in the art would have understood how to make the appropriate modifications to the Jewell assembly to fit other firearms, despite differences in imparting impact to the cartridge, whether bolt, hammer or otherwise. Patent Owner(s arguments here all a related to the Mauser bolt-action, but even if the Examiner’s first position regarding the lower trigger receiving area were not accepted, certainly the receivers of other firearms as applicable still are relevant.
That said, evidence of such a known modification is provided in the form of the Taiwan Patent No. 409,847 to Lin Li establishes that modular trigger housings were in fact known at the time of the inventions for other types of firearms such as the AR-15 platform as shown in figures 3 and 4, for example, reproduced below:
35 25
46

This is in direct contradiction to Patent Owner’s contention that those in the art would not have understood how to modify Jewell to fit other types of firearms, particularly the AR-15 platform. Accordingly, Li proves that those in the art at the time of the invention were not only capable of performing the modifications suggested in the rejection, but more importantly, were aware of such use in a lower receiver, or trigger receiving area, of a firearm. This evidence addresses the point in the supplemental response regarding the insertion of the trigger assembly into the AR-15 platform from the top rather than the bottom as in Jewell’s bolt action example.
Patent Owner’s remaining argument as to the Jewell trigger components being supported “by” the pin rather than “on” the pin have been considered but are not persuasive as it appears that the scope of the limitation is the same in both respects.
Claims 3, 7 and 11-15 are rejected under 35 U.S.C. S 103(a) as being unpatentable over Jewell in view of Bielfeldt, US. Patent No. 5,904,132 to Biller and U.S. Patent No. 2,514,981 to Walker et al (Walker) for the reasons set forth above for Claims 5, 6, 8 and 9, and further in view of Benelli Montefeltro Super 90 (American Rifleman Publication) as evidenced by the Super 90 — Montefeltro 20Montefeltro 12 (Benelli Owner’s Manual – Jan. 2002) and US. Patent No. 4,103,586 to Tollinger, and as further evidenced by the AR-15 Schematics as evidenced by
Taiwan Patent No. 409847 to Li for the reasons noted above.
Claim Interpretation
It is to be understood that the limitations from canceled claims 1 and 2 are effectively a part of patent claim 3 based on dependency. They are being considered as follows.
(From Canceled Claim 1)
Jewell discloses a trigger group module (trigger assembly 10) for a firearm (e.g., a rifle) of a type having a receiver that defines a trigger group receiving area between first and second receiver side walls. Jewell shows a firearm receiver that is formed in the stock
(16) of a firearm (see Fig. 1) and that defines a trigger group receiving area between first and second receiver side walls (see Fig. 2), within which the module would be received. Note the discussion above with respect to the receiver interpretation: the Examiner’s position is that the receiver of Jewell constitutes both the bolt receiving area as well as the trigger component receiving area. While it is recognized that the bolt receiver is a term or art, generally referred to as the receiver generically, the firearm in
Jewell nonetheless includes a trigger component receiving area or cavity. The art is fully aware of instances where the upper action of a rifle is considered the upper receiver and the portion that houses the trigger components is considered the lower receiver (e.g. the AR-15 platform as evidenced by the AR-15 Schematics). Here, broadly, the sum of the trigger receiving area and the bolt receiving area can certainly collectively be considered a receiving area or receiver.
Moreover, and possibly more importantly, Jewell’s trigger assembly is not limited to use in a Mauser-type bolt action rifle. Jewell specifically states that the trigger assembly is applicable to other firearms: “(t)he trigger assembly 10 can easily be adapted for use in other types of firearms….” Thus, to the extent those in the art would not have interpreted a bolt action rifle to have upper and lower receiver areas, those having ordinary skill in the art would have understood this teaching to be equally applicable to firearms with specifically designated upper and lower receiving areas, such as the AR-15 platform for the intrinsic benefits making the trigger housing replaceable. Thus, it would have been obvious to have used the Jewell trigger assembly in other firearms, including those with upper and lower receivers, given Jewell’s explicit teaching to do so. Since this may be considered a newly presented position, this rejection has not been made final.
Jewell further discloses a module housing (housing 26), which is adapted to be inserted to an operating position in such trigger group receiving area, as shown in Figs.
1, 2 (see also col. 3, lines 64-65).
Jewell additionally discloses a number of trigger group components mounted within the module housing. These components include an arm lock means (20), a trigger piece (22), and a link mechanism (24) (see col. 4, lines 1-3).
Jewell also discloses a first pin receiver positioned in the module housing so as to align with first pin receptacle openings of a firearm when the module housing is in an operating position. Jewell’s first pin receiver in the module housing (26) is substantially defined by an opening or an aperture in each of the housings walls, through which a pin
(30) passes. As demonstrated, this pin receiver would be capable of being positioned for aligning with opposed pin receptacle openings of a firearm when the module housing
(26) is in a position within a firearm’s receiver (see annotated versions of Figs. 2, 4 below), by which to permit the pin receptacle openings of the firearm to function as pin support surfaces in the firearm’s receiver side walls.
(Fig. 2, with added notation by the Examiner taken from the Reexam Request)

(Fig. 4, with added notation taken by the Examiner from the Reexam Request)
PIN RECENER

Jewell further discloses a first module pin mounted in the first pin receiver in the module, on which a trigger group component is supported in the module housing. As evident in Figure 1 (see above), Jewell has one of its trigger group components (i.e., an arm lock means/arm lock 20) supported in the module housing (26) about a module pin
(30). The pin is received in a pin receiver (the openings in the module side walls; see annotated Fig. 2).
Also present is a pin-receiving sleeve that receives the pin (30) therein (again see Figs. 1 and 2). This is also described by Jewell’s specification (see col. 4, lines 45): “The arm lock means 20 is pivotally mounted to a housing 26 on a sleeve about pin 30 . This passage would tend to indicate that the sleeve also defines a componentsupporting pin. Jewell further discloses the following regarding the sleeve being connected (in some manner) to the housing (see col. 6, line 67 – col. 7, line 7): Even if removal of the trigger assembly 10 is necessary (see FIGS. 1 and
2), removal of the pin 30 allows the entire trigger assembly to be quickly
removed from the rifle 12. That is, a sleeve connects the lock arm 20 to the housing 26, the pin 30 passes through the sleeve to connect the housing 26 to the stock 16. The rear portion of the housing 26 is supporting in the stock by a lip. Thus, removal of pin 30 allows removal of the entire trigger assembly 10. (Examiners emphasis)
However, it should be noted that Jewell’s Figures 3 and 4, although tending to indicate that pin (30) is physically mounted in the receiver openings in the module’s housing wall, fail to show that a pin receiver opening also mounts therein the pinreceiving sleeve. Its specification also does not describe such a structural relationship.
Therefore, even if the unnumbered sleeve itself would reasonably qualify as a module pin in Jewell, the pin’s disclosed location fails to meet (for it) the limitation that calls for a first module pin to be mounted in the first pin receiver.
Accordingly, Jewell by itself fails to disclose a first module pin that both (1) has an opening for alignment with the pin receptacle openings of the firearm and (2) is mounted in a first pin receiver positioned in the module’s housing. Instead, Jewell has a pin (30) mounted in a pin receiver opening (in the housing; see Fig. 4) but not itself having an opening, and Jewell further has an unnumbered sleeve having an alignable
opening, which even if it is determined to define a pin and connect a component to the housing, is nonetheless not mounted in a pin receiver (which is positioned in the module housing).
Nonetheless, it is suggested in the trigger mechanism art to make a componentmounting pin hollow that also functions as a bolt. More specifically, Bielfeldt suggests, to one of ordinary skill in the art, to pivotally mount a trigger sear (indicated with the number 21) on a “fixed pin or bolt 27” (see col. 3, lines 52-55), and Bielfeldt’s Figure 1 tends to show that this fixed pin or bolt 27 is hollow. The trigger mechanism includes components 12, 21, 30 located between housing plates (see col. 3, lines 20-23). The description of the mounting element 27 as a “bolt” implies that the element may at least connect the trigger sear (pivotally) to one of the housing plates 10. Moreover, the term “bolt” would tend to suggest that the connection is made by extending it into or through an opening. The term would thus suggest to the artisan that a bolt 27 is mounted In an opening in at least one housing plate 10 (in the Examiner’s opinion).
Moreover, the sear in Bielfeldt is disclosed as being pivotally mounted at one end, and Figures 1 and 2 show the sear overlapped with one of the housing plates.
Requester (12/16/2014 Reply, p 8) has argued the following:
Further, given that the assembly of Bielfeldt is shown and described as a self- contained assembly, and is not dependent on the firearm to maintain the characteristics of the assembly (e.g., the location and pivoting nature of sear or other trigger components), it is clear that the sear (21) is mounted to the plates (10) by way of the pin/bolt (27) (i.e., the pin/bolt being attached to the plates) in order for the sear to be able to pivot within the assembly.
The Examiner continues to find the argument persuasive. The artisan would understand from Bielfeldt that the pivotal mounting of the sear is to a housing plate via the bolt. Furthermore, the characteristic of mounting a supporting pin in both opposed plates of a housing is already within the ordinary skill in the art (see Jewell regarding mounting pin (30)).
Requester has cited judicial support for considering that combining “familiar elements according to known methods is likely to be obvious when it does not yield more than predictable results, and that altering the prior art by the mere substitution of
one element for another known in the field, yields no more than a predictable result (see 9/8/14 Request for Reexamination, p 31). Based on this argument, Requester has
further argued that the substitution of the pin or bolt (27) of Bielfeldt for the unnumbered
sleeve of Jewell would yield the predictable result of permitting removal the entire
trigger assembly (10) of Jewell from the firearm, while managing to retain the lock arm means (20) in a pivotally mounted relationship with the housing (26) even after removal of the pin (30).
Requester has additionally argued that one of ordinary skill in the art would be
motivated to replace such a sleeve of Jewell with the “pin or bolt 27” of Bielfeldt, which pivotally mounts a similar component to a similar housing, so as to retain Jewell’s lock arm means (20), the spring (36) and the block (62) (and, possibly, other components) in
their assembled order within the housing (26) even after the assembly has been
removed from the firearm.
The Examiner agrees. Accordingly, for these reasons as argued by Requester, it would have been obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art, in view of Bielfeldt, to have replaced the unnumbered sleeve of Jewell with a hollow bolt and, moreover because the replaced hollow element constitutes a bolt, to have connected it (the bolt) in the opening in the housing’s (26) plate.
With regard to the limitation (from claim 1) “the module housing having a lower extremity that is located above a lowermost edge of the first receiver side wall and a lowermost edge of the second receiver side wall when the module housing is in the operating position”, Jewell meets such a functional limitation. More specifically, the firearm in claim 1 defines intended use in the claim, and the recitation of the position of the module in the firearm is therefore one that is functional. Jewell meets the limitation merely because Jewell’s trigger assembly, including the module housing 26 thereof, is capable of being placed in a hypothetical firearm that would be much like what Jewell shows regarding a rifle, but wherein the rifle’s receiver is instead configured slightly differently so that the lowermost edges of the side walls of the rifle’s receiver would extend beyond the module housing’s (26) lower extremity when the module’s pin is connected in the rifle’s receptacle openings. Furthermore, Jewell, even when it is modified as explained herein in view of Bielfeldt, would remain capable of meeting the limitation regarding the module’s lower extremity. Using a hollow bolt as a sleeve in Jewelf in view of Bielfeldt would not result in preventing installing the modified Jewell module in a firearm having side walls that extend below the extremity of the module.
(From Canceled Claim 2)
Claim 2 is to a trigger group module fora firearm. Accordingly, the trigger group module is structurally set forth in claim 2, whereas the firearm in this claims is read not as structure but as intended use. Therefore, the recitations in claim 2 of the locations of the module or module’s components relative to the firearm merely define functional limitations related to that intended use.
MPEP 2114 essentially addresses how function/intended use (i.e., a nonstructural limitation) is examined in relation to the prior art. Function is met by the capability of the prior art to perform the function, even if there is no disclosure of the function ever being performed. Moreover, a reasonable rationale of how a function can be performed is sufficient for meeting the functional limitation.
The functional limitations in claim 2 regarding locations in relation to a firearm do not distinguish the claimed subject matter over the ability of the structure of Jewell’s module (and modified forms thereof in view of the other applied art) to achieve such locations in a firearm. With regard to meeting the intended use, there is no requirement that the firearm exist in the prior art, but only that it can exist. Thus, the functions defined by the locations of the structure in the claims in relation to a firearm need only be capable of being performed with respect to a hypothetical firearm. Stated differently, it is only necessary that the present rejection sufficiently indicate how the claimed location(s) can be commonly achieved by the module of Jewell in a firearm, in addition to indicating how the module limitations are present in Jewell’s module (or an obvious modified version thereof).
Regarding the additional limitations set forth in claim 2, Jewell of the art combination discloses a second pin receiver in the form of a second opening for a second pin (30). See Figure 4.

As with the limitations in the independent claim 1 (which is a canceled patent claim), the firearm is set forth in the claim as intended use, and the claim recitation regarding alignment of the second pin receiver with second pin receptacles of the firearm constitutes a functional limitation. Jewell meets the functional limitation regarding alignment because its module is capable of being received in a hypothetical rifle similar to that shown by Jewell but further slightly different by having second receptacle openings that define pin supporting openings that would align with Jewell’s second pin receiver (i.e., while the first receptacle openings are aligned by the first receiver opening and while the lowermost edges of the receiver side wails extend below a lower extremity of the housing side walls).
(Claims 3 and 7)
Modified Jewell discloses the invention substantially as claimed however fails to disclose or fairly suggest a second of the pin including an opening which would align with pin receptacle openings of a firearm when the trigger group module is in an operating position in the firearm and supporting an additional one of the trigger components.
Tollinger teaches that the art was well aware of a removable trigger housing that uses two pins to allow removal of the trigger housing from the firearm, e.g. pins 37 in Figure IA. Additionally, trigger components as trigger 35 is mounted on a bushing that receives the leftmost pin 37 and a shell carrier on the rightmost in the figure (pivot bushings 38 and 192 respectively). The bushings however do not permit replacement of trigger housing components as the bushings are “fixed in the housing” and thus cannot constitute pins with openings. However, the American Rifleman publication teaches a hammer mounted between the first module side wall and the second module side wall on the first module pin for rotation on the first module pin, thus suggesting that other trigger group components might similarly be mounted on such a module pin. It would have been obvious, given these combined teachings to have modified the Jewell trigger housing to allow for two retainer pin connections to the receiver as well as to utilize module pins with openings to receive the retainer pins to thereby allow replacement of trigger components that pivot thereabout.
(Claim 11)
Modified Jewell is applied as above to the like limitations of Claim 1. Modified Jewell discloses the invention substantially as claimed but fails to disclose or fairly suggest a hammer being mounted on a first module pin that has ends mounted in first pin receiver openings in first and second module walls and that has an opening therethrough aligned with the first pin receiver openings; and a trigger being mounted on a second module pin that has ends mounted in second pin receiver openings in the first and second module walls and that has an opening therethrough aligned with the second pin receiver openings. However, the American Rifleman publication teaches a hammer mounted between the first module side wall and the second module side wall ori the first module pin for rotation on the first module pin, thus suggesting that other trigger group components might similarly be mounted on such a module pin. Further, Tollinger establishes that it was known to rotatably mount the trigger of a firearm about a pin bushing in a removable trigger assembly in the same field of endeavor.
Accordingly, it would have been obvious to those having ordinary skill in the art at the time of the invention, given these combined teachings, to have configured the modified Jewell removable trigger assembly housing with removable trigger assembly components including a trigger and a hammer as explicitly taught by Tollinger and the American Rifleman publication as a matter of routine engineering design depending upon the firearm that the trigger assembly was being incorporated into as indicated by
Jewell.
(Claim 12)
See the application of the above art to Claim 3 above.
(Claim 13)
See the application of Jewell to Claims 1 and 5 above.
(Claim 14)
See the application of Jewell to Claims 1 and 5 above, those in the art would have immediately recognized that the AR-15 platform is operable in a semi-automatic firing mode.
(Claim 15)
See the application of Jewell to Claims 1, 5 and 11 above.
New Ground of Rejection
Claims 3, 5-9 and 11-15 are rejected under pre-AIA 35 U.S.C. 103(a) as being unpatentable over Taiwan 490,847 to Li in view of the AR-15 Schematics, U.S. Patent No. 4,671,005 to Jewell, Benelli Montefeltro Super 90 (American Rifleman
Publication) and US. Patent No. 4,103,586 to Tollinger.
It is to be understood that the limitations from canceled claims 1 and 2 are effectively a part of patent claim 3 based on dependency. They are being considered as follows.
(From Canceled Claim 1)
Li discloses, in and AR-15 rifle platform (compare to the AR-15 schematics figures) a trigger group module (firing assembly 46) for a firearm of a type having a receiver (lower receiver at 41) that defines a trigger group receiving area between first and second receiver side walls (see Figure 3).
35 25

Li further discloses a module housing (frame 1), which is adapted to be inserted to an operating position in the trigger group receiving area (as shown in Figs. 2-4). As can be seen in figures 2 and from the phantom lines 3 of Li, the module housing has a lower extremity that is adapted to be located above a lowermost edge of the first receiver side wall and a lowermost edge of the second receiver side wall when the module housing is in the operating position (this is this is an intended use limitation since the receiver is not claimed, yet Li still meets this function as it is capable thereof). As can be seen from Figure 1, Li additionally discloses a number of trigger group components mounted within the module housing. These components include, inter alia, a hammer (25), a trigger (10), and a hammer spring (32). See Figure 1:
31

Li discloses a first pin receiver (hole 2) positioned in the module housing that is capable alignment with first pin receptacle openings of a firearm when the module housing is in an operating position (although not shown in the Li lower receiver, note the AR-15 schematics lower receiver contains two pin receptacle openings that receive pins
(25) that would align with the trigger component pin holes 2 and 3 of Li in use). (It is noted that since the firearm is not claimed this is an intended use limitation, thus the receptacle openings are inherently capable of alignment with unclaimed receiver holes.) Li further discloses a first module pin (23) mounted in the first pin receiver on which a trigger group component is supported in the module housing (see figure 1 and the above listed components).
Li explicitly states that the firing assembly is for emergency replacement of the firing body assembly, e.g. translation at [0057], thus those in the art would have appreciated that the trigger assembly is intended to fit in the lower receiver of an AR-15 platform aligned with the pin openings, such as those shown in the AR Schematics. Li however teaches attachment of the module to the receiver via the selector (44) instead of via module pins and more specifically, via module pins with an opening (as a hollow sleeve such that typical module pins can connect the assembly to the receiver). Thus, it cannot be fairly stated that Li teaches that its first module pin has an opening for alignment with the pin receptacle openings of the firearm (to permit the aforementioned removal as a unit). In sum, Li teaches a similar replaceable trigger module as claimed only with a different mode of attachment to the firearm receiver.
First, the art was fully aware that the pins in a standard AR-15 platform, as evidenced by the AR-15 schematics pins (35), are for supporting trigger components:

Lower Receiver and Buttstock Assembly
Second, the art was fully aware of the use of hollow bushings in removable trigger module housings to attach those housings to a receiver as evidenced by Jewell and Tollinger. For example, Jewell teaches first and second receiver side walls including a first pin receptacle opening, which functions to define a pin support surface. Figure 2 shows the receptacle openings of the firearm supporting a pin (30). Jewell teaches that trigger components (as arm lock means (20) can be mounted on a bushing about the pin, such that removal of the pin from the bushing permits removal of the trigger assembly from a trigger receiving area of firearms in general. See Figure 1 of Jewell above. Tollinger goes one step further than Jewell and uses two pins to allow removal of its trigger assembly housing from a firearm receiver, e.g. pins 37 in Figure 1:

Additionally, trigger components are mounted on pin receiving bushings, such as trigger (35) that receives the leftmost pin (37) and pivots about bushing (38) and a shell carrier on the rightmost bushing 192. The bushings however do not permit replacement of trigger housing components after removal from the firearm as the bushings are “fixed in the housing” and thus the bushings themselves cannot constitute pins with openings. However, such hollow pins (bushings) that allow removal of trigger components from a trigger assembly after removal of the trigger assembly from a firearm were also well known in the art as follows:
The American Rifleman publication teaches a hammer (1) mounted between the first module side wall and the second module side wall on a first module pin, i.e.
removable bushing (1 5), for rotation on the first module pin (hollow bushing) and wherein a module pin (14) connects the trigger assembly to the receiver (44) via the bushing/first module pin:

Thus suggesting to those in the art that other trigger group components might similarly be mounted on such a module pin or removable bushing.
It is noted that combining familiar elements according to known methods is likely
to be obvious when it does not yield more than predictable results, and that altering the
prior art by the mere substitution of one element for another known in the field, yields no
more than a predictable result. Accordingly, the substitution of the hollow module pin or bushing (15) and its corresponding module pin (14) for the pins 2 and 3 of Li would have yielded the predictable result of connecting the trigger assembly to the stock trigger component attachment openings of an AR-15 platform rifle lower receiver while permitting removal the entire trigger assembly (46) of Li from the firearm (see the AR-15 Schematics) while managing to retain the trigger components in a pivotally mounted
relationship within the housing (46) even after removal of the module from the unit, and thus preserving the capability of swapping out trigger components from the Li trigger assembly.
In sum, it would have been obvious, given these combined teachings to have modified the Li trigger housing to use two hollow module pins that permit replacement of trigger components that pivot thereabout while allowing for module pin connection via
the hollow module pin holes to the receiver of an AR-15 platform receiver via its stock trigger component holes.
(From Canceled Claim 2)
Claim 2 is to a trigger group module fora firearm. Accordingly, the trigger group
module is structurally set forth in claim 2, whereas the firearm in this claims is read not as structure but as intended use. Therefore, the recitations in claim 2 of the locations of the module or module’s components relative to the firearm merely define functional limitations related to that intended use. Li’s hole locations are thus inherently capable of the claimed intended use and function.
MPEP 2114 essentially addresses how function/intended use (i.e., a nonstructural limitation) is examined in relation to the prior art. Function is met by the capability of the prior art to perform the function, even if there is no disclosure of the function ever being performed. Moreover, a reasonable rationale of how a function can be performed is sufficient for meeting the functional limitation.
Regarding the additional limitations set forth in claim 2, modified Li discloses a second pin receiver in the form of a second opening (3) for a second pin (24). See Figure 1 above. Notably, the openings in Li would align with the second pin receptacle openings of the lower receiver in the AR-15 schematics.
(Claims 3 and 7)
Modified Li discloses a second module pin (bushing as modified by American Rifleman) including an opening which would align with pin receptacle openings of a firearm (AR-15 Schematics) when the trigger group module is in an operating position in the firearm and supporting an additional one of the trigger components as each of the original Li pins 2 and 3 perform such a function.
(Claims 5 and 6)
See the application of the above art to Claim 3 above.
(Claim 8)
See the Li Safety (44) mounted on the receiver (41) and engaging a trigger component in Li Figures 3 and 4.
(Claim 9)
Those in the art would have known that the lower receiver inherently attaches to an upper receiver in the applied AR-15 platform.
(Claim 11)
Modified Li is applied as above to the like limitations of Claim 1. As to the hammer being mounted on a first module pin that has ends mounted in first pin receiver openings in first and second module walls and that has an opening therethrough aligned with the first pin receiver openings note hammer (25) mounted on the first module pin 24; as to the trigger being mounted on a second module pin that has ends mounted in second pin receiver openings in the first and second module walls and that has an opening therethrough aligned with the second pin receiver openings, note the module pin (23). Li modified to include the American Rifleman Publication module pins or bushings in place of the stock pins would meet the “mounted on” and “openings” limitations.
(Claim 12)
See the application of the above art to Claim 3 above.
(Claim 13)
See the application of Li et al. to Claims 1 and 5 above.
(Claim 14)
See the application of Li et al. to Claims 1 and 5 above, those in the art would have immediately recognized that the AR-15 platform is operable in a semi-automatic firing mode.
(Claim 15)
See the application of Li et al. to Claims 1, 5 and 11 above.
Conclusion
This is a non-final Office action because it newly considers the recently
discovered Taiwan 409847 Patent Publication which was not previously of record during the prosecution history.
In order to ensure full consideration of any amendments, affidavits or
declarations, or other documents as evidence of patentability, such documents must be
submitted in response to this Office action. Submissions after the next Office action,
which is intended to be a final action, will be governed by the requirements of 37 CFR
1.116, after final rejection and 37 CFR 41.33 after appeal, which will be strictly enforced
The patent owner is reminded of the continuing responsibility under 37 CFR
1.565(a), to apprise the Office of any litigation activity, or other prior or concurrent proceeding, involving the reexamined patent throughout the course of this reexamination proceeding. See MPEP SS 2207, 2282 and 2286. The third party requester is also reminded of the ability to similarly apprise the Office of any such activity or proceeding throughout the course of this reexamination proceeding. See
MPEP SS 2207, 2282 and 2286.
All correspondence relating to this ex parte reexamination proceeding should be directed as follows:
By EFS: Registered users may submit via the electronic filing system, EFS-
Web, at:
https://efs.uspto.gov/efile/myportal/efs-registered
By Mail: Mail Stop Ex Parte Reexam
ATTN: Central Reexamination Unit
Commissioner for Patents
U.S. Patent & Trademark Office
P.O. Box 1450
Alexandria, VA 22313-1450
By FAX: (571) 273-9900
Central Reexamination Unit
By hand Customer Service Window Randolph Building 401 Dulany St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
For EFS-Web transmissions, 37 CFR 1.8(a)(1) (i)(C) and (ii) states that correspondence (except for a request for reexamination and a corrected or replacement request for reexamination) will be considered timely filed if: (a) it is transmitted via the
Office’s electronic filing system in accordance with 37 CFR 1.6(a)(4); and, (b) includes a certificate of transmission for each piece of correspondence stating the date of transmission, which is prior to the expiration of the set period of time in the Office action Any inquiry concerning this communication or earlier communications from the Reexamination Legal Advisor or Examiner, or as to the status of this proceeding, should be directed to the Central Reexamination Unit (CRU) at telephone number: (571) 2727705. The fax number of the CRU is: (571) 273-9900.
/Jeffrey R. Jastrzab/
Jeffrey R. Jastrzab
Primary Examiner
Central Reexamination Unit 3993
Conferees: /BMF/ and /GAS/

U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
Document Number
Country Code-Number-Kind Code Date
MM-YYYY Name CPC Classification US Classification

c US-

US-
US-

J US-

Notice of References Cited Application/Control No.
90/013,341 and 90/013,655 merged Applicant(s)/Patent Under
Reexamination
7293385
Examiner
JEFFREY R. JASTRZAB Art Unit
3993 Page 1 of 1
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
Document Number
Country Code-Number-Kind Code Date
MM-YYYY Country Name CPC Classification
N 409847 10-2000 Taiwan F41A19/06
o
p

s

NON-PATENT DOCUMENTS
Include as applicable: Author, Title Date, Publisher, Edition or Volume, Pertinent Pages)
u Machine translation of Taiwan 409847.

w
x
*A copy of this reference is not being fumished with this Office action. (See MPEP S 707.05(a).) Dates in MM-YYYY format are publication dates. Classifications may be US or foreign.

U.S Patent and Trademark Offce PTO-892 (Rev. 01-2001)

Notice of References Cited Part of Paper No. 20160914

【1 1】公告編號 · 409847
【44】中華民國 89年(2000)

【51】Int.CI 0 F41 Al 9/06
】名稱
【21】申請案號 2亅創作人, 李德華
申請人:
聯勤第二○五廠【7代理人
1 5刀申請專利範圍
中華民國專利公報阝9〕阝2亅
10月21日
新型 全4頁
【22】申請日期、中華民國88年(1999) 04月13日
高雄市前鎮區瑞平里二十六鄰武慶一路二之六號九
高雄市中山三路九十八號
2

1 ·一種自動武器的擊發機構模組(47) ,其係包含一擊發機構總成(46) ,一固定下節套與擊發機構總成之選擇器(44) ,以及選擇器定位簧(45 ) ;此一擊發機構模組可與下節套輕易分離與結合·結合後即具有多功能射擊之擊發裝置。
2 ·依據申請專利範圍第1項所述之擊發機構模組,其中選擇器(44)形狀似L型圓柱,其上有多個方向的凹槽,直柄部份有防滑條紋及箭頭。
3.依據申請專利範圍第1項所述之擊發機構模組,其中選擇器定位簧(45 )可準確放置在擊發機構總成(46)內之方槽
(6)中,連接選擇器,並壓迫選擇器尾部弧形凹槽,以有限度的限制選擇器任意轉動。
4畩據申請專利範圍第1項所述之擊發機構模組,其中選擇器定位簧(45)形狀似魚鉤,當放入正確位置運動時,具有剛性與彈性。
5.依據申請專利範圍第1項所述之擊發機 5 · 構模組,其中擊發機總成(46 )其盒狀面之最大孔洞,能作為側向插入選擇器
(44)以固定擊發機構總成(46)與下節套
(41)。
6·依據申請專利範圍第1項所述之擊發機 10· 構模組,其中擊發機構總成(46 )其軸向前端凸出平板可作為擊錘(25 )向前旋 運動時阻止擊錘(25)過度旋轉,使擊錘 (25 )與軸向保持90度夾角。
7·依據申請專利範圍第1項所述之擊發機 15· 構模組,其中擊發機構總成(46)內之方槽(6)其寬度與選擇器(44)尾部四個弧型凹槽配合並利用選擇器定位簧(45)結• 合及定位。
一5259一
8·依據申請專利範圍第1項所述之擊發機
(2 )
構模組,其中選擇器(44)尾部四個弧型凹槽係位於同一切面並互相平行對稱。
圖式簡單說明
第一圖為擊發機構總成分解圖· 第二圖為擊發機構總成結合圖, 5· 第三圖為下節套結合擊發機構模組之
腹槽圖;
第四圖為安裝擊發機構總成示意圖, 第五圖為選擇器裝配示意圖,
第六圖為擊發機構模組裝配於下節套
總成剖面圖·
第七圖為擊發機構模組圖

第一圖
一5260-
第二圖
第三圖
第四圖
一526亅一一

47一
第七圖
一5262

Patent/Publication Number
409847
Title Firing mechanism module of automatic firearms
Issued[PubIication Date 2000/10/21
Application Date 1999/04/13 Application Number 088205701
Certification Number 167208
IPC F41A-019/06
Inventor Ll, DE-HUA TW
Applicant 205th FACTORY, COMBINED SERVICE FORCESTW
Individual F
New oatent sDecification
IPC Category: F41A19 / docket number: 088 205 701
06
one, New name:
Automatic weapons firing mechanism module two, Chinese New Summary:
This creation is a conventional automatic weapons firing mechanism to be modular, combined with the difficulty of improving the decomposition and improve the proper rate. Firing mechanism assembly contains a hammer, trigger, single trigger button, three rounds of the trigger button, the hammer spring, ratchet, ratchet spring system, deduction and deduction Jihuang other parts, assembled individually in a boxlike framework; and automatic weapons when combined, the firing mechanism assembly is inserted from the bottom section to put under the direction of the next section sets belly tank, the selector sleeve from the bottom side of the insert section, then select the positioning spring from the top of the cartridge inserted into the firing mechanism of inter-groove inside, to complete the assembly, and achieve the purpose of fire control.
three, New Engl ish Abstract:
four, FIG designated representative:
(A) case designated representative Pictured: Article ( ) FIG.
(B) The symbol element representative diagram of a simple explanation: Fives, New Description:
[Technical Field] The novel belongs
[Prior art]
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
[Embodiment]
The first firing mechanism assembly line diagram exploded view, contains the following main components: a firing mechanism frame (l ), the trigger (10), single trigger button (17), three rounds of the trigger button (20), pins ( 23), hammer (25), the ratchet (31), deduction (35) and sear pin (40) and the like.
Firing mechanism assembly assembled in order; is part of the trigger, the hammer part and the like deduction part, as follows: the trigger (10) part of the first trigger spring bore (8), (9) sets the trigger two lugs (Il ), (12), the trigger button spring (16), respectively snap into single trigger button groove (18) and three rounds of the trigger button groove (21), and then the single trigger button (17) and three hair trigger button (20) together into the trigger slot (14), the above part is assembled into the firing mechanism of the frame (I), pins (23) from the left side of the firing mechanism frame hole (2) to wear clothing, and while passing through single trigger button hole (19), three rounds of the trigger button hole (22) and protruding ears (13), to complete the trigger (10) and part of the firing mechanism frame (l) of the assembly.
[0053] Hammer (25) part of the ratchet system spring (30) and the ratchet (31) set into the hammer lug (26), the hammer spring hole (33), (34) set into the hammer lug (26
(27), the above-assembled part is pressed into the firing mechanism holder (l) during and after the hammer spring (32) towards the needs of the feet, the studs
(24) from the left side of the firing mechanism frame holes (3 ) piercing, and while passing through the hole hammer (28), complete the hammer (25) and part of the firing mechanism frame (1) of the assembly. When the hammer (25) back pressure, the hammer groove (29) snaps into the trigger face (15), then the hammer (25) That attack was prepared state.
[0054] Deduction (35) part of the buckle Jihuang (38) into the groove deduction (37) inside, this part of the firing mechanism into the frame (1), the deduction of the pin (40) from firing mechanism frame the left side of the hole (4) wear clothing, and also through the buckle Jihuang hole (39) and the deduction of holes (36), complete with the firing mechanism of the deduction of part of the frame (1) of the assembly.
[0055] The trigger (10) part of the hammer (25) and deduction of part (35) in sequence and part of the firing mechanism frame (1) Serve firing mechanism assembled mold assembly (46), as shown in Figure Il .
[0056] The fourth picture shows a schematic of the next section sets binding firing mechanism assembly, the second map of the firing mechanism assembly (46) by a third diagram in the next section sets (41) pushed down the top of his abdominal groove (42); so that the firing mechanism frame (1) on the edge of the sleeve and the lower section (41) is flush with the upper edge; push button machine (35) on the forward edge of the selector (44) from the bottom section housing side hole (43) penetrates, through the firing mechanism frame (1) of the left side of the hole (5), so close to the next section sets the selector on the left side, then relax deduction, this time under section sleeve and firing mechanism assembly (46)
that is secured together, which Please refer to the case of the fifth assembly diagram. Then select the positioning spring (45) from under the firing mechanism assembly (46) on the direction of the insertion firing mechanism holder (1) the party groove (6), to complete the entire assembly, which assembled cross-sectional view of a sixth refer to FIG.
[0057] To replace the cartridge when the firing mechanism, just in opposite program wi Il be selected positioning spring (45) and a selector (44) taken out to the firing mechanism assembly and the lower section set apart; in an emergency can be quickly replaced firing body assembly, the proper rate of automatic weapons upgrade considerable help.
[Brief description of the drawings]
[0050] The first picture shows an exploded view of the firing mechanism assembly; second photo shows the firing mechanism assembly in conjunction with FIG; third picture shows the cover under Section Abdominal groove module of FIG firing mechanism; fourth picture shows the instal lation of the firing mechanism assembly schematic; The picture shows a schematic view of a fifth selector assembly; assembly sixth picture shows a cross-sectional assembly drawing of the firing mechanisln module under section sets. The picture shows the firing mechanism seventh mode Photos. The main elements Legend] [0003] firing mechanism frame
[0004] the left hole
[0005] the left hole

4
[0007] 5
[0008] 6
[0009]
[0010]
[0011)
[0012] 10
[0013] 11
[0014] 12
[0015] 13
[0016] 14
[0017] 15
[0018] 16
[0019] 17
[0020] 18 • •
[0021] 19
[0022] 20
[0023] 21
[0024] 22 •
23
the left hole the left hole square grooves trigger spring trigger spring sleeve hole trigger spring sleeve hole trigger lugs lugs protruding ears trigger slot trigger surface trigger retaining spring single trigger button single trigger button groove single trigger button hole three rounds trigger button three rounds trigger clasp groove three rounds trigger button hole studs

24 • studs
25 • hammer
[0028] 26 hammer lug
[0029] 27 • hammer lug
[0030] 28 • hole hammer
[0031 ] 29 • hammer groove
[0032] 30 spring ratchet system
[0033] 31 • ratchet
[00341 32 • hammer spring
[0035] 33 harmer spring hole
[0036] 34 • hammer spring hole
[0037] 35 deduct ion
36 deduction hole
[0039] 37 • deduction groove
[00401 38 • buckle Jihuang
39 • buckle Jihuang hole
[0042] 40 • deduction pin
[0043] 41 following section sets
[0044] The fol lowing section sets ventral groove 42 •
The following section sets 43 • side hole


six, Patent Appl ication range:
Firing mechanism module 1. An automatic weapon (47), which system comprises a firing mechanism assembly (46), a fixed lower section of the sleeve and the selector of the firing mechanism assembly (44), and a selector positioning spring (45 ) ; a firing mechanism of this module can be easily separated and combined with the next section sets, in combination with a firing mechanism after the shooting versatility.
44 • selector
[0047] 45 selector positioning spring
[0048] 46 firing mechanism assembly
C0049] 47 firing mechanism module
2. The firing mechanism based on the scope of the patent module of Item 1, wherein the selector (44) L-shaped like a cyl inder, on which there are grooves in multiple directions, straight shank portion with non-slip stripes and arrows.
3. The firing mechanism based on the scope of the patent module of Item 1, wherein the selector positioning spring (45) can be accurately placed in the side groove (6) firing mechanism assembly (46) within the connector selector, and oppression selector rear arcuate recess to limit the selection is limited to any rotation.
4. The module of the firing mechanism in accordance with paragraph 1 of the scope of the patent, wherein the selection is positioned spring (45) shaped like a fishhook,

when placed in the correct position, rigid and flexible.
5. The firing mechanism based on the scope of the patent module of Item 1, wherein the firing mechanism assembly (46) of its biggest box-shaped holes in the surface, can be used as a lateral insert a selector (44) to secure the firing mechanism assembly ( 46) and under section sleeve (41).
6. The firing mechanism based on the scope of the patent application modules of the first one, in which the firing mechanism assembly (46) axially projecting flat front end can be used as a hammer (25) to prevent rotation of the forward movement of the harmer (25) excessive rotation, so that the hammer (25) to maintain 90-degree angle to the axial direction.
7. The firing mechanism based on the scope of the patent module of Item 1, wherein the side groove (6) firing mechanism assembly (46) within a width of a selector (44) and the tail with four curved grooves use Select positioning spring (45) in combination and positioning.
8. The firing mechanism based on the scope of the patent module of Item 1, wherein the selector (44) four curved tail section and the groove is in the same line of symmetry parallel to each other.
Seven, Schema:

The first Figure 

Il Figure

Ill Figure

fifth Figure

VI Figure 
44

第七圖
VI I of FIG.



Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the Associate Editor and moderator at TFB. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!


Advertisement

  • Sgt. Stedenko

    TL/DR
    A wall of text, especially not in English gets you a big fail, Phil.
    Are you paid by the copy/paste word count these days?

    • DW

      That Chinese part is the patent of T86 rifle trigger, which was covered by T86 and possibly included because of TFB’s hard work. It stayed in Chinese, I assume, because it has to in the court of law. And your tl;dr was provided by Phil in the 2nd paragraph: ” I’ve attached the court document below for you review. This time illustrations are included of a Jewell trigger as well as referencing other triggers also with illustrations. Now this is a long document but many have asked we show the entire document which is what I’ve done. Of course you can scroll down to see the rejection and reason for this second rejection.”

      • QuadGMoto

        I am wondering if it already is, or should be, posted on Scribd to preserve the formatting, making the wall ‘o’ text effect less pronounced.

  • GD Ajax

    It never goes well for a company when they start filing lawsuits against small companies for copyright infringement.
    Come 2017 I except to see “Mossberg files for chapter 11”

  • LOLOLOLOLOL…

  • It’s not a court document, it’s a USPTO re-examination report…

  • Scott

    Taiwan design save all these trigger company. Amazing.

  • kingghidorah

    I read it word for word.

  • Smedley54

    I’m still puzzled that Mossberg would:
    1. File this patent in the first place.
    2. Behave like a patent troll.
    3. Go to mat in defending a clearly dubious claim.

    Behavior like this is the worst combination of hubris, greed, and stupid.

    • IIRC, they purchased the patent.

      • Smedley54

        Are you referring to Chip McCormick/CMC? I think they filed the original patent, and then sold it to Mossberg.

  • Dougscamo

    Thank God for this article…..I have been suffering from insomnia…..