Gun Review: Hi-Point JHP .45 ACP

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Making fun of Hi-Points and their owners have become a bit of a pastime in the firearms community thanks to the poor reputation that the pistols have gained for an unknown reason. I had an opportunity to find out for myself if the Hi-Point pistol really does suck or we are elitest jerks when we make fun of those who own Hi-Points. I came into possession of a Hi-Point JHP chambered in .45 ACP a while back and finally decided it was time to review the chunky pistol.

Looking over the specs on the Hi-Point website the JHP .45 seems to have a lot going for it on paper, does this carry over to the real world?

Barrel length: 4.5″

Overall length: 7.75″

Weight: 35 oz.

Frame: High-impact polymer

Finish: Black powder coat with polished sides

Capacity: 9-shot magazine

Sights: 3-dots, fully-adjustable rear sight

All Hi-Point handguns feature:

dot +P rated

dot High-impact polymer frame

dot High-impact grips

dot Durable, attractive easy-grip finish

dot 3-dot, fully adjustable sights

dot Free extra rear peep sight

dot Last round lock open

dot FREE trigger lock

dot Magazine disconnect safety

dot Quick on-off thumb safety

dot Operations & safety sheet

dot 100% American parts & assembly

dot Lifetime warranty

The JHP isn’t a small pistol by any means, the large blocky slide while unsightly is necessary to ensure the pistol’s function. The JHP uses a blowback design and relies on that considerable weight to make sure that pressures in the barrel have dropped to a safe level before allowing the breach to open. IMG_3947

With a magazine capacity of 9 rounds in a single stack magazine, the JHP could be considered in the same class as the 1911? No, it couldn’t. It does hold an adequate amount of ammo though. IMG_3950

The sighting system was a bit odd and seemed to buck the more common practice of using larger, easier to see sights for what looks like an adjustable rear sight with a fixed front post. Even though the sights are painted contrasting colors, I did find that they were a bit tough to pick up quickly at first. As the range day went on I was able to pick them up much faster and with practice, it would be second nature. I do appreciate that they included an adjustable rear sight at the price point the pistol is sold at, the ability to dial your sights in without the use of a punch is nice.IMG_3951 IMG_3952 IMG_3953

The safety, while working properly was a bit of a bear to disengage quickly thanks to its rather low profile. I am all for making a pistol holster friendly, but when it comes at the expense of the ability to get the pistol into action quickly it might be prudent to offer a more pronounced lever. On the plus side, it does its job and render the pistol safe when activated. Like the sights, I can see the safety being easier to use with some practice.IMG_3954

Grips on the pistol are simple and functional. I didn’t find them to be uncomfortable and well within what I would call serviceable. Functional and serviceable is a consistent theme with the JHP .45, even the injection molded trigger falls into the same category. The trigger pull feels smooth but has an unpredictable break and a long reset. It isn’t exactly a match trigger, but again it is functional and does what it is supposed to do. IMG_3956 IMG_3957

My single complaint about the JHP .45 is the rail. I can’t think of a single reason it isn’t offered with a standard rail. Instead, Hi-Point molded in a proprietary section of rail on the pistol’s dust cover. I guess a rail is better than no rail at all, but I would have much-preferred something that met the industry standard. IMG_3958

Shooting the JHP .45, I found that it wasn’t that bad at all. Wait, what?

While the pistol’s individual parts might not be up to par with a GLOCK, HK or other manufacturer it still was a gun that can be bought under $200 new. The recoil was pleasant and gentle, the pistol’s sights settled back onto the target quickly, and it didn’t feel that bad in the hand. I was simply shocked that it performed as well as it did.  hipoint3hipoint4

I decided to set up a target and give shooting a group a try. Sadly, today was not my day for shooting well and I shot a rather poor group through no fault of the pistol. Even with my poor shooting, I was able to produce some groups that were nothing short of passable. Given the reasonably crude design of the Hi-Point, it seems that while it isn’t a bullseye shooting pistol, it will hit what you are aiming for.hipoint2 IMG_4008

So what do I think about the Hi-Point JHP .45 after shooting it for an afternoon? I can’t hate it even though I want to. After 400 rounds of .45 between myself and my friend, we didn’t experience a single malfunction even though I tried to induce one and hit what we were aiming at as long as we did our part.

Would I hesitate to recommend a Hi-Point JHP .45? No. If all someone had to spend on a gun was $200 and they wanted to get into the shooting hobby or wanted a pistol for personal protection I think it is a solid contender. Sure, there are better options out there, but at a much higher price. Sometimes as shooters we forget that not everyone is willing to eat ramen for months to afford that fancy new pistol that we have our eyes on.

The Hi-Point JHP .45 carries an MSRP of $219 as tested, you can learn more about it on Hi-Point’s website. 



Patrick R

Patrick is a Senior Writer for The Firearm Blog and works in the shooting sports industry. He is an avid recreational shooter and a verified gun nerd. With a lifelong passion for shooting, he has a love for all types of firearms, especially handguns and the AR-15 platform. Patrick may be contacted at tfbpatrick@gmail.com.

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • Nicholas C

    Interesting.

  • Dickie

    i refuse to believe that a person cannot save an extra $100 for a NIB S&W SD9VE. Which is the lowest ive seen a “good” gun for new. Have a coworker who is tight on cash and was considering a hipoint. Then we all convinced him other wise and is buying a used SD40VE with 4mags for $200. So there are much better options out ther. The hipoint would be worth it for $50 bucks and no ffl paperwork needed since it barly qualifies as a gun.

    • iksnilol

      I dunno, the Hi-Point seems awfully tempting. Low recoil, high accuracy, lifetime warranty and foolproof durability.

      • Andrew Miller

        I’ve only fired a carbine, but it was a garbage disposal for ammo, you could put any 9mm round inside and BANG.
        I pondered one for a “vehicle gun”.

        • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

          The only thing that keeps me from taking them more seriously is the single stack magazines. Make one that takes a Glock mag and I am in!

          • iksnilol

            Agree there but it makes it attractive for ban states.

          • Isaac Newton

            Funny thing is dealers are banned from selling zinc slide guns in some states like Illinois, South Carolina, Hawaii, and Minnesota

          • kingghidorah

            I just saw a showcase full of them at both Dicks Pawn and 707 guns in Myrtle Beach.

          • jay

            Nope. Not at all. Rather own a Jennings or Raven.

          • randomswede

            It must be a very deliberate choice/compromise on Hi-Points part.

            I wrote a much longer thing, but in the end I suspect it comes down to:
            A double stack Hi-Point appeals to a customer who is very unlikely to actually buy a Hi-Point.

            A quick google suggests no one’s tried to make a Hi-Point eat out of a Glock magazine, it kinda sounds like a fun project, especially as I understand Hi-Point would replace the frame as many times as you need to get it right.

          • jay

            I don’t think they would replace it after realizing you are destroying it, not by use (failure of the parts), but by actual destruction.

          • randomswede

            Could be, they have supposedly replaced some guns that I personally probably wouldn’t have tried to get replaced.

          • jay

            Yes, there have been a few firearm manufacturers that have had a all inclusive, everything covered warranty. Almost all change, and degrade their warranty,eventually. Specially when it becomes evident that it is being abused by certain people (criminals, or dishonest individuals). If they can stay in business, increase their market share, continue to improve their product, and keep the all inclusive warranty, then more power to them.

          • Giolli Joker

            Glocks tilt the barrel aligning the feeding ramp with the first round in the magazine, the angle of the rounds takes this into account. A simple blowback has a fixed barrel and feeding ramp. It would not be impossible to make a simple blowback feed from a Glock mag, but the amount of redesign needed (+ retooling for a new frame) would probably require a price spike over the current Hi-Point, making it lose the cost advantage.

          • jay

            If you want a Glock, buy one. A hi point will never be a Glock. If you want to make something, look at “RoyalNonesuch”, his Youtube videos give directions on how to make plenty of firearms. And some of them are even as pretty as a hi point.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            That isn’t what anyone is saying.

            We were talking about the Hi-Point Carbine and I said “is they make one that takes a Glock mag I am in” I think it would be a pretty cool range toy on the cheap!

          • jay

            I must have misunderstood the thread. I thought the review and most of the responses were about the hi point pistol. I have no issue with a hi point carbine. Wouldn’t own nor recommend either, but no issue with the carbine. My apologies if I wee’d in your oatio’s.

          • jay

            Then buy a Glock…. They take Glock magazines with out any modifications. Just sayin.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Wow! I didn’t know Glock made a carbine. Learned something new.

          • jay

            Come on Patrick! I know of at least three companies that make Uppers to turn a Glock into a carbine. Also, Keltec makes a carbine that can take Glock magazines. If someone wants a hi point carbine then fine. But a carbine isn’t a pistol. And I’d never suggest a hi point pistol to anyone I liked, or cared about to have dependable self protection. You don’t have to agree with me, but I’d bet you don’t use your hi point for self protection. You have something much much better. Ask Alex C. if he’d trade his HK in for a hi point. Wish I could see his face when you do… ;-}

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            You are right, I wouldn’t use it for protection. Than again I have enough money to buy the pistols I want, some people don’t.

            I know there are several kits that convert a Glock, but that does not make it a Glock carbine. I have two in for review right now, at least one of them is pretty rough. The other I would never use for personal defense.

      • demophilus

        Not for nothing, but I was drinking with some gun guys after one of a America’s periodic school shootings, and the topic of conversation (such as it was) was what kind of issue weapon is suitable for small schools — JCs, high school, etc., etc.

        Cheap, reliable, forgiving of bad ammo and maintenance, simple manual of arms, low capacity to inhibit collateral damage — I opined that you could do worse than some 9mm C9s in locked drawers, and 995s in locked cabinets, all Condition 3, all using the same mags.

        I had to buy another pitcher to calm everyone down, but one of the strippers heard me and agreed, so she gave me a discount on a lap dance.

        So I had that going for me. Which was nice.

        • jay

          I hope you would reconsider protecting our children with hi points. If the people armed are teachers, all the worse. Glad you got an extra tickle. Try selling them low cost health insurance, for them and their kids. You’ll probably get more than a lap dance….

          • demophilus

            I was joking, guy. It didn’t actually happen, not like that.

            Don’t know what you mean about teachers. A few of mine were veterans, and/or hunters. They could shoot.

            The sad thing is, the authorities probably don’t put defensive weapons in schools on account they’re afraid someone will flip out, start shooting up a PTA meeting.

          • jay

            Not a lot of teachers in kalifornia are former military. Some, but the unions and school boards tend to look down on former military. Something about only wanting leftists teaching our kids. Schools really don’t like to hire conservative people. You have to be a closet (or open) socialist to teach in kalifornia and new york. As a teacher you are part of a big union that wants everyone disarmed, and only the Police to have firearms. So, if you want to arm teachers you would have to convince the politicians (who take money from the unions), the unions, the school boards, the teachers themselves (leftists), and of course the parents. Major uphill battle. I think the Teachers should have the option (opportunity) to conceal carry. If the school and board approve it, then they should pay for the CCW, and give the teacher a defender bonus, for these special teachers. But I’d not allow hi points for those situations. Hard to conceal and not enough ammunition. And BTW, low capacity does not inhibit collateral damage. Training, operational security, and awareness, are the only things to avoid collateral damage. Low capacity firearms in a self defense (or defense of our children) situation are a handicap for the defender. This means our children are also at disadvantage. As for someone shooting up the PTA meeting, well, you can’t tell when someone is going to go nuts. That being said, very few CCW holders have gone nuts or committed crimes with firearms. Also, if there were more than 1 or 2 conceal carrying teachers, then it would be a form of protection during PTA meetings, as it would be protection during the school days.

      • jay

        Buy a Toyota, for the quality of car, with a great warranty. Or, buy a hyundai, not for the car, but because it has a great warranty.

    • Andrew Miller

      Well.
      Sure.
      If they had your bankroll.

      • jay

        Think hi point would sell more pistols if they sold them with a cheap $10 holster, spare mag, and a box of ammo? Of course the cost would be passed on to the customer. Then they’d have to dish out what real economy firearms are costing.

    • marine6680

      You have never been ramen poor before I take it?

      When your paycheck barely pays for your basic bills, and only leaves a small amount for food and gas… Well, saving up an extra $100 is a daunting nigh impossible task.

      I remember a story my mother told me once after I had grown… Back when I was a young kid, 5-6, and my sister who is a couple years younger, asked my mother if she would get us some French fries from McDs, she told us no, and continued driving home.

      She then went to the bathroom and cried.

      Because she could not afford to pay 25 cents for a small fry. (This was the 80s)

      When you can’t afford to pay 25 cents for a small fry… You can’t afford to save $10, let alone $100.

      • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

        This guy gets it.

        • marine6680

          I try to inject a little reality when I can. Thanks

      • Mother of three, and she fed us ramen noodles (half a pack each) over instant potatoes made from the “broth” twice a week. She was paying off my sister’s medical and dental bills from a bike wreck and was trying to keep the lights on.

        I’ll never forget it. (Nor the love the man she married and took us all in as his own provided.)

        • demophilus

          People forget it, but back in the 80s, maybe early 90s, McDs had an ad campaign — “What do you want with your fries?” Because, that’s all people ordered, ‘cos that’s all they could afford.

          I don’t begrudge anyone buying a Hi-point, no matter what their reasons. Never shot one, but I’m looking forward to it.

      • jay

        Wrong. You just have to try harder, and wait longer. There are always ways to get what you want if you persevere and work towards your goal. Nice story though. I teared up. Had the same sort of life myself. But Mom, when she wasn’t working, was a seamstress, taught sewing, made needle point, painted, just about any kind of art work she could sell. Didn’t have everything, but we boy’s mowed lawns, pulled weeds, painted houses inside and outside. I even did baby sitting. We all helped. Food was always good, and from scratch. Never went hungry. So persevere and work towards your goal.

        • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

          Dude, some people don’t have that opportunity. You don’t seem to get it. There are millions of people in the US that are stuck under a mountain of debt with no end in sight, little to no marketable skills, no extra time, and mouths to feed. $50 can make all the difference in the world. If someone has a need for the cheapest firearm that will go bang, the Hi-Point is a great option. It works, and if there is an issue Hi-Point will fix it.

          Moral of the story: Guns like the Hi-Point need to exist to arm those that are less fortunate than yourself. Hell, if a Hi-Point gets someone into shooting that would be another great reason they exist.

          Chill out, the damned things aren’t the giant hunks of crap you think they are.

          • jay

            I disagree. I’ve handled them and fired 2. However, yes there is a niche for them. And I won’t fault anyone who chooses to own one. I would not. And I would not recommend them. But then again, I’m not destitute and yet willing to spend money on a firearm when I should be feeding my family. Each to their own. Peace.

        • marine6680

          Hard work can pay off, but single parents do have it hard in that type of situation. With dedication you can save over a year or two and get something decent.

          But most people in that situation are not buying a gun for fun/hobby.

          It’s because their crazy abusive ex is getting out of jail in a couple months. Saving an extra hundred bucks to get a better pistol a year from now… Not really a tenable course of action there.

          The gun you have, is always better than the one you do not have.

          • jay

            That is absolutely true. But a person in the situation you described most likely cannot afford enough ammo to train properly. They will most likely have enough for one box of ammo, and then everything sits in the nightstand drawer, because they can’t afford ammo and range fees. Not ideal. But as you stated, if you absolutely have to have something. Even if you aren’t proficient with it, then it will have to do.

          • marine6680

            Many an inexperienced person has protected themselves. Training is always a good idea, and so is regular practice, but its not an absolute necessity to protecting yourself successfully.

            And its good that there are options in many price ranges. At least a Hipoint will most likely work, unlike many cheap firearms.

          • jay

            You can defend yourself with many things. Sometimes, even a knife can win in a gun fight. I just wouldn’t recommend it.

    • Andrew Miller

      It’s not “just the extra $100 for an SD”, there’s the ammo, range time, maybe a holster, another magazine…

      • Hoplopfheil

        So you don’t need ammo, range time, a holster or a spare mag for a Hi-Point?

      • jay

        Need the same for any firearm. Unless it’s just a drawer peice, or an intimidation piece (corner dealer likes to wave it around, but never shoots it). Pure rationalization.

    • Blake

      “no ffl paperwork needed since it barly qualifies as a gun.”

      What?

      Even if you bought this junk from an FFL for $1, you’d still need paperwork:

      http://blurbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/home-made-gun.jpg

    • Hoplopfheil

      Taurus Millennium G2, $209 bucks.

    • RocketScientist

      Totally, man. Totally agree. Why can’t all these poor people just like, get more money, huh?

      • jay

        Or save longer? Or have little Timmy cut his crack addition down, just a little bit?

  • Daniel

    Does anybody remember seeing pictures of groupings that did not come with the disclaimer “may not be my day” prior to pictures shown? We know everyone can shoot a 1.25 in group at 25 yards when there’s no cameras around but some of us have 6000 other things to do and don’t shoot as much as we’d like to.

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      I have posted some pretty decent groups, that particular day I was shooting like crap.

  • Pod

    Oddly enough we were bagging on Hi-Point since their factory caught on fire yesterday.

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      I can assure you that is coincidental. This article has been written since Saturday night.

      • Pod

        Hahaha, actually I was just reflecting on the coincidence as a whole, not a suggestion that Hi-Point combusted upon hearing someone reviewed their product in a positive manner 🙂 But still, the subtle humor is part of the reason I love coming here.

  • Rick Matoy

    Shooting a Hi-Point is like riding a girls bike! A lot of fun until someone sees you!!

    • Andrew Miller

      It has much more effective range than harsh language, but won’t conceal quite as well as, say, a Shield or a J Frame.

    • Major Tom

      A girls bike has the advantage of not giving you black and blue balls when you slip off the seat and onto the (lowered) crossbar.

      But then again, black and blue balls from the crossbar is excellent motivation to not suck at bikes.

    • Anonymoose

      I’ve noticed that all those rental bikes that are popular right now have step-through frames…

      • Swarf

        That’s because, uhm, improved alloys and… metallurgy. Aaaand… engineering!

  • Andrew Miller

    My best friend worked at a large gun dealer.
    Handled “returns”.
    Hi Point had one of the least of them…if a person actually broke it in.
    Being a blowback pistol, with a heavy spring, it can take a hundred or two hundred rounds to actually make it work reliably.
    Sometimes not though and they worked right out of the box, like a guy I knew who, during the Ammo Drought of 2012 bought 300 Wolf 9mm I had to break in one and said he never had a bobble.

    If somebody only had $500 to spend on self defense, that’s the direction I’d send them.
    (2 Hi Points and ammo to break both of them in plus practice)

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      I have hear a lot of “I have a friend” or “a guy I know” stories about the Hi-Point. Never have i had someone who owns one step up and say they break or don’t work.

      • Andrew Miller

        He ended up selling it to another buddy of mine before moving out of state. I wanted to buy it just to try for fun, but had already spent my “gun money” when it came up for sale. And it was “only” 250 with a holster, spare magazine, and 250 rounds of ammo…

      • marine6680

        I had the 9mm carbine for a while… That count?

        It was reliable and fun to shoot, I would even say I could have confidently used it as a defensive weapon.

        I traded it for some reloading supplies though.

        I found that the higher capacity mags from promag work, if you put a little epoxy in the mag well opposite the mag catch. There was enough play in the mag well that the magazine rotated a bit against the pressure from the catch. This caused the nose of the bullet to want to hang under the bolt catch causing nose dive failures.

        A little epoxy held the mag straight. And a little reprofiling of the bolt stop just for some extra measure.

        Result was very reliable 15rd mags.

      • UD

        Did have a guy I know shoot his with my friends XD and my USP45. He couldn’t understand why it was so inaccurate, and why it jammed so much. Our feeling was “hey, pay a little more and I bet it works ok.”. I didn’t like his much at all, but I’d sure use one over harsh language. Not for me, but if you want to buy one, I’m going to be happy you’re a 2nd A supporter rather than give you guff.

        • jay

          Well, still give em a little guff. But not enough to make them cry, and get their man card pulled.

      • Tim Pearce

        I owned one. It didn’t work (after 5000 rounds).

        • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

          I think after 5000 rounds in a sub $200 handgun, you might have got your money out of it.

          • Tim Pearce

            Yes, but things like the S&W Sigma will last tens of thousands of rounds, and don’t cost that much more.

          • Sasquatch

            To some people it is that much more. Believe me been there.

        • Sparky57 USA

          That’s why it has a lifetime warranty.Anything fails,they are very good at replacing it.Great customer service at HP.

          • Tim Pearce

            Honestly, it was more than just “my gun doesn’t work right anymore.” I’d gotten over my Cheapgunitis by that point and it was time to switch to something that for which warranty work wasn’t an inevitability.

        • RocketScientist

          After 5000 rounds you can mail it back and they’ll send you a new one. And they’ll do that indefinitely. For your great great grandkids.

          • jay

            I don’t believe that.

          • Tim Pearce

            It’s the “indefinitely” part I don’t believe. Even assuming they stay in business, if I wear out or destroy gun after gun, asking them to replace it each time, I’m not going to be a bit surprised if there’s a point where they end up saying, “No” or “Not for free.” Honestly, they’d be idiots to keep sending me guns after I’ve destroyed nine in a row.

            I’m not enough of a jerk to buy a Hi-Point and deliberately destroy it and every replacement of it, to find out what that cut off point is.

      • dirtsailor

        I still have one I purchased in late ’88 or early ’89. A Stallard Arms JS9mm.

        Never had any more problems with it than I have any of my other firearms.
        Have fired more rounds through it than I care to think about.

    • Tim Pearce

      A decent percentage of Hi-Point owners don’t shoot their pistols. Ever.
      An unfortunate percentage of Hi-Point purchasers are turning around and selling them on the street. This is based on the number of gun traces the shops I’ve worked at had for Hi-Points (at one point, one of these dealers said the Hi-Points were being traced five times more often than all other guns, combined).
      But, yes, it was my experience that Hi-Points had fewer instances of purchasers bringing them back to our shop to either try to return them or have us send them in for warranty work, due to defects, compared to Taurus and Kel-Tec. However, compared to Glock, Smith & Wesson, etc, Hi-Points were far more likely to be defective.

      • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

        Police property room data seems to disagree with the assumption that they are sold on the street more than any other gun. I think that is another gun store myth.

        • Tim Pearce

          Well, it was the experience of two different gun shops I worked for, and the reason one of them decided to stop selling them (well, that combined with the fact that the management were breaking the law and didn’t want to draw the ATF’s attention too much). The other one stopped selling them because they felt Hi-Points brought in too many African Americans and the management were so racist I’d be surprised if they *weren’t* in the KKK.

          • RocketScientist

            The plural of “anecdote” is not “data”

          • MarkVShaney

            Technically it is… it’s just not independently verifiable data.

    • jay

      Get a better price on a “gat” from the corner drug dealer. Probably a better gun as well. ;-}

      • Andrew Miller

        You have an awful lot of info about “the hood” and “buying hot guns”.
        I’ll pass.
        One thing to go to a flea market, ArmsList, or a gun show, but go to the “corner drug dealer” and ask him for a gun.
        Let me know how it works out, or if you end up with both no money and no gun.

        • jay

          I was trying to be humorous. I try my best to stay on the right side of the law. ;-} Just really don’t like the hi point pistol. The carbine is ok for what it costs.

        • jay

          That was meant as humor. Sorry I failed. But my point is the same. You are better off doing any of those purchase situations you listed in your previous comment, than to purchase a hi point. Sorry, but I’m biased against them. Also, anyone in such financial straits will most likely be unable to afford training time, and ammo. So a purchase will likely sit in the night stand and never be used until an emergency. I’m sure you would agree that not training, is a bad thing.

  • Harry’s Holsters

    I enjoyed this write up. A Hi Point 9 is on my list. I really want to compare my performance vs Glock, CZ, Walther, SW and others.

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      It isn’t as good, but it still goes bang when you want it to.

    • Get the carbine! Great smiles per dollar ratio!

      • Harry’s Holsters

        A buddy just got one. Fun gun for sure and if makes since for his budget but given the cost I’d rather put with money into a good light for my AR or save towards and optic for it.

  • Holdfast_II

    I’m glad to hear that the Hi-Point was reliable and reasonably accurate – obviously that speaks well to Hi-Point’s ability to make an adequate product at a very low price point. Kudos on good engineering and manufacturing.

    That said, if you’re really that strapped for cash, why get a .45 where the food is minimum $15 a box, when you could get an 9mm and feed it for under $10 a box. And wouldn’t a police trade-in Glock be a better way to go?

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      A police trade in Glock is going to be almost double the cost of a Hi-Point at the current market rate.

      As far as why a .45? That is what I happened to acquire for $0 out of pocket. I traded the Hi-Point for some old car parts in my garage. I think I came out on top.

    • Tim Pearce

      *Police* trade-ins are rare. A plain used Glock isn’t even all that easy to find, and will, as Patrick said, cost about twice what a new Hi-Point will.
      It would be a better option, anyway, though.

  • alabubba

    There is a series of videos on YouTube where they TRY to blow up a high point. After watching them I no longer make fun of high points!
    And you forgot their warranty.

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      While yes, this article was written for gun people who are well aware of the Hi-Point and the warranty. I didn’t set out to help sell them, I wanted to explain to gun people why they don’t suck.

  • derpmaster

    If they made one in 10mm I’d buy it in a heartbeat.

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      Wait till you see the 10mm monster we have a post on later this week. I nearly made a mess in my pants.

      • Swarf

        Which kind of mess? This is important.

        • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

          I’ll let you decide.

          • BearSlayer338

            Just say the color,so we will know if we should wait to read your future post or to let it stay with you and your pants.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            They are all the same color … I should probably see a doctor.

    • iksnilol

      You can convert the .40 S&W model to 10 mm safely.

      • DanGoodShot

        Yes. But that means you have the money to buy not only the powder and primers(.40 casings are plentiful at the range and bullets can be made from melted down used tire weights.) but all the equipment needed to do it. Even if you went with all Lee it still would be more than enough to buy a better gun.

        • iksnilol

          Umm, rechambering a .40 SW to 10mm is in a fixed barrel carbine isn’t that complicated. And who mentioned reloading?

          • DanGoodShot

            I read your post too quickly, misunderstanding. I still feel take the the coin you’d spend on that just buy a better gun. But if you like the Hi-point them go for it. Who’s to tell who what to spen their money on. I’m just speaking my opinion. We all know what they say about opinions.

    • Paladin

      I find the idea of a blowback 10mm… unsettling.

      I’m sure it could be done safely, but I certainly wouldn’t volunteer to test fire it.

      I also don’t think 10mm really fits the ethos of the Hi-Point. They’ve built their business around making reliable firearms accessible to the very bottom end of the market. 10mm is still a pretty niche round, and lacks the availability of the big three. If you can afford to source 10mm ammo, you can probably afford a better firearm to use it in.

  • POWNV

    I don’t know. I think I’d look at a used wheel gun first if money was that big of an issue.

    • Andrew Miller

      Wheel guns are mechanical.
      Most parts on an “auto” are “drop in”.
      With a wheel gun it’s “hand fit”.
      Know a gunsmith?
      You’ll need one.

      For Hi Point money I don’t see a wheel gun I’d trust.
      The days of “used Smith Model 10 Police Trade in’s for $149” are about a decade ago.

      • PersonCommenting

        plus wheel come ammo is expensive typically. While 45 isnt exactly cheap it is still cheaper than 357 mag and pretty much every other wheel gun caliber other then 38 spl which is decently pricey too. I wish hi point would make a full sized 9mm. I think those would make more sense for a budget gun.

        • jay

          Reloads. Buy reloads. .45 is not cheaper than .38, or 9mm. You are buying ammo in the wrong places.

          • PersonCommenting

            I was thinking more of 9mm. 45 acp is typically around 13-25 bucks a box and 38 is about the same. Most people who buy hi points are just going to be buying one box maybe 2 at a local store like walmart or maybe a big box sporting goods store.

      • jay

        I’d trust a S&W 1898 over a hi point. Or a Nagant pistol. I’ve fire all three. They serve a niche. namely those to cheap to save a bit longer for a dependable inexpensive gun. Or the dealer on the corner who will resell it after busting a cap in another ghetto rat, or upgrades himself to anything.

    • PersonCommenting

      Why a used wheel gun is still going to be expensive, also wheel guns ammo is more expensive than semi auto. If a hi point is all you can get then go for it they really arent that bad of guns but there are better semi autos that are 100 bucks more.

      • jay

        Nope, used wheel guns are not that much more, and you can also find used semi auto’s for just a bit more. Better off saving, and buying something that isn’t a monster and concealable.

        • PersonCommenting

          Saving what? Like I said revolvers are more expensive as is the ammo.

          • jay

            I see small Mom and Pop stores selling them at reasonable prices. And ammo is cheaper if you buy the reloads from the indoor ranges.

          • PersonCommenting

            Snubbies are pretty reasonable but your full sized guns are not so inexpensive.

  • PersonCommenting

    The best thing you can do for a hi point is mess around with the magazines. That is their weakest point. Or spend some extra money on 1911 mags if youre buying a jhp 45 and make the changes so they will work in the hi point.

    • jay

      Buy a 1911 then. Save the messing with the hi point for the ghetto junkies.

      • PersonCommenting

        I agree. You can buy a turkish 1911 for around 299 online. Or buy some sig knock offs for 250-275. That being said hi point mags do work for the most part if there is a problem it usually is the magazine.

  • JT303

    I suspect that if I came to the States, out of pocket and needing a gun, a Hi-Point is better than the el cheapo, and the first rule of a gunfight is, of course, bring a gun. For $200, there seems to be the kel-tecs, the little .22s and not much else.

    • Swarf

      Unless you’re talking mouse gun, Kel-Tecs seem to be either vaporware or monkey QCed dog’s breakfast.

      And if you want a mouse gun you can get Ruger’s version of a Kel-Tec for $225 these days and have a mouse that roars real good. At least mine does.

    • Tim Pearce

      Hi-Point *is* the el cheapo. The only way to get cheaper is to find a used Jennings, Bryco, Raven, Davis, Jimmenez, etc and be either unaware of the risk of shooting one, or just crazy.

      • JT303

        Yes, well, that’s what I meant. It’s a gun, for very little money, but it isn’t downright deadly to shoot.

    • jay

      Better off with a Keltec. It’s concealable. Although, when you run out of ammo in the hi point, you can hurt someone by throwing it at them.

  • Ben Wong

    listen we actually tried to abuse the hipoint and then sent it on for the warranty and if damn them sonofabitch sent it back new

    • Tim Pearce

      Yeah, well, your next of kin might appreciate that aspect, but if your gun gets you killed because of inherent shittiness, it doesn’t do you a lick of good.

      • Eric S

        You apparently missed the part of the article where it was said they didn’t have not one malfunction. That’s exactly as many as I’ve had with my jhp .45, and the c-9 model as well.

  • AC97

    If nothing else, just be glad that it isn’t a Remington R51 or Ring of Fire gun.

    • Tim Pearce

      Yeah, I often referred to Hi-Points as the “safe variety of ultra-cheap.”

  • Wolfgar

    Sorry, I cannot see myself purchasing a Hi point. The logic is there for many reasons but I couldn’t do it. I would have to wait till I could afford something better. I could and have lived with many things that were sub par but when it comes to a self defense firearms and dating there is a line I wont cross. Well maybe if no one was looking!

  • Sasquatch

    The first handgun I called mine. My review of it was the same. Use it till I had enough green to buy a better handgun.

    • jay

      But you bought a better gun…..

      • Sasquatch

        Yes but at the time I was dead broke married working a crap part time job and got the darn thing for build fence along with some cash I ever so desperately needed. As time progressed I found my self in a better job along me too afford something nicer. Hi points have there place and it serve me well and true till I could get something nicer.

        • jay

          Your response if perfectly understandable. You didn’t buy it. It’s like when I got my Lever gun. Getting out of the military in 2 days. Had a car that didn’t run, needed work, so I traded it to my buddy. Got a great Marlin 336 CA in .35 Remington, along with some other stuff, and a small bit of cash. I’d have never bought it myself. But it’s a great brush gun for deer or bear, and I still have it 25 years later. I’d just never recommend a hi point “pistol” to anyone. If they want a cheap carbine, fine. But I believe there are lots of other options for a pistol. Be well!

          • Sasquatch

            I would recommend one if all they could spend is $100 and scraped to get that.

  • Dan Atwater

    Regarding the “it’s a good option if you’re too poor to afford a S&W SD9 for a hundred bucks more”… Maybe so. But most people who buy Hi-Points (in my personal experience selling guns in two states, so ymmv) fit one of two categories:
    1) People who aren’t poor, just cheap. They don’t care about shooting handguns and treat the whole transaction like I treat buying a coffee maker–the cheapest one works just fine and there’s no way in hell I’d pay even 10 bucks more for the one with the clock on it or whatever the hell. I’ve sold more than a few Hi-Points to folks who have a lot of money in hunting rifles or fancy shotguns and just want a handgun as a check-in-the-box.
    2) People who are buying them with the intent to resell them to folks who can’t pass a NICS check.

    The legit poor people that I can recall couldn’t afford Hi-Points and bought pepper spray.

    • Anonymoose

      They’re not bad for the glove compartment or nightstand. If you lose it in the woods or the cops “lose it” in the evidence room after a defensive shooting, it’s not as big of a deal. I wouldn’t want to use anything over $1000 for a car/truck/HD gun for exactly this reason. Fancy 1911s and MSRs and stuff are great for competition and possibly for SHTF, but a Hi-Point, SDVE, Glock/M&P/XD, Beretta, surplus SIG, etc, some kind of reputable .38, 357, or .44 revolver, a cheap pumpgun, or a stripped-down homebuilt AR or AK would be my top picks in terms of dependability, price, and shootability. Keep the fancy raceguns and spaceninja toys in reserve.

    • Swarf

      They had to shoot them often because of that damn single stack magazine.

    • Tim Pearce

      In my years selling guns, I often saw a third type. I refer to them as the Magic Talisman Purchasers. They’ll buy a gun and literally never shoot it, and that’s really what they think of it. “It doesn’t matter if it’s a steaming turd, because the only time I’ll ever fire it is in self-defense.” They have this strange believe that merely having a gun is all that’s necessary to keep the bad guys away.

      • Matt Taylor

        Just a hunch, but I reckon that’s a tad bit better strategy than keeping the cell phone on the night stand to whistle in the magical law keeping fellers…

      • Russ Kell

        I have met several of these ‘magic talisman’ people over the years. The topic of of pistols would come up and someone would say ‘I own a pistol, but have never shot it’. Each time I’ve been surprised.

        • codfilet

          I have a number of firearms that are brand new, in the box, and I’ve never fired them (yet). I like guns, I like these, and I bought them when I could-maybe they won’t be available in the future. I don’t have a lot of spare time now, and I hate shooting at ranges. Some day, I’ll have more spare time, and I’ll take them out to the property I own to shoot.

      • Dan Atwater

        I’ve had plenty of them as well, they’re just a subset of group #1.

    • Donald Crowe

      I am frugal, not cheap. I shot a 45 and it fit my needs for 1/2 the $ of the fancy pistols.

    • Chris

      I think there’s another type of buyer – someone who wants a cheap and reliable gun that has no intention of ever carrying it concealed.

      I was given a Hi Point 9mm by my father when he upgraded to something nicer. I have many other guns that are much nicer, but honestly, I’d been wanting one of these for a while. Why? Because I wanted to keep a reliable firearm within reach when I was in my workshop, but didn’t necessarily want to carry on my person when I was working with torches, welders, and other tools. Sure, I could have used one of my other guns, but I like to carry those, and didn’t want to have to swap it out or move it. The Hi Point was a great choice for a dedicated “workshop gun” that could be mounted under a bench or kept in a toolbox drawer. If I’m working in my shop and something suspicious goes down in the neighborhood, I have a reliable pistol within easy reach at all times.

      I also bought a “cheap” double barrel 12 gauge to mount for dedicated garage use, but decided not to use it for that when I found out it was a ~1911 AH Fox shotgun… not bad for $250.

  • EhlerDave

    I have a C-9, it is big, bulky, heavy and looks like a brick, but I have fed it ever type of ammo I can find and the silly thing runs them all with no problems.

    I do not like the small safety lever, but it was bought as a tackle box gun and it is great.

    Not sure why so many people who shoot talk bad about the gun or the people who have them. Myself I know a few people that this would be all they can afford. It is not an option to save more and buy a different weapon, this is the limit they can get.

    I also know more than a few folks who talk crap about the guns, yet have never shot one. Could that be because once that bullet leaves the bbl it does not matter what the cost of the gun was?

    • Tim Pearce

      I don’t bad-mouth the people who own them. But, with the gun, a turd is a turd. Some work, some don’t. When I sold them, I didn’t want the customer feeling like I suckered them into buying a lemon, so I was truthful with the pros and cons of the guns.
      And, yes, it does somewhat matter what the cost of the gun was. I’ve owned a rifle with a cheaply made barrel that was heat-stressed. It mattered quite a bit that I’d made the mistake of buying a cheap gun.

  • Kivaari

    The only ones I have shot were two .40 caliber guns that a local dealer got in for customers. They did not work, and I took them to the range to see if I could tweak the magazines to get them going. I couldn’t. The dealer shopped them to Hi Point and they were returned in working order. They are cheaply made. That said I had a new SIG .40 and I never could make it work well. Same for an HK .45. You can always find a lemon.

  • kingghidorah

    I’d go with a tokarev.

  • Guns from scrap

    the Hi-point pistol is the Mosin Nagant of handguns, cheap but it works considering what it’s made of.

    • jay

      Never ever be in the same class or grouping as a Mosin Nagant. Minute rifles (mine is 2 moa), cannot be compared to modern day jennings, and raven, saturday night specials. You may polish a turd but it still smells, and leaves nastiness in your hands after being held. ;-}

  • Mine’s better than yours.

    #LimitedEdition #Collectable #Investment #BenjisOnMyGat

  • John

    I think it’s possible that the reason for the poor reputation may be the inexperience of the buyers. You rarely see seasoned shooters owning/shooting HiPoints but I have seen a lot new shooters with them.

    My friend was given a HiPoint .45 and we went out for a day with some really cheap ammo. The gun did jam a lot but after I disassembled it, I could tell it was not cared for. It was completely filthy and had NO oil on it. After a clean ‘n’ lube it still jammed with the cheapie ammo but not nearly as much.

    I clean and oil after every range trip just because I like to but I find newer shooters often don’t. That may exacerbate even a small fit/finish issue to cause malfunctions.

  • Raoul O’Shaugnessy

    “breech”.

    • Patrick R. – Staff Writer

      “Thonks”

  • Mark Horning

    Let us be very clear, Poor people have the Right to Self Defense just like anyone else.

    It’s ugly, it’s bulky, the safety is too small, and the triggers tend more towards Stanley than Colt. But they go bang, and bang again, and again. Hi-points might have the ergonomics of a Russian Tractor, but they are reliable.

    And Affordable, and poor people have the Right to Self Defense just like anyone else.

    Now, I think that for $200 for home defense you are better off buying a used Mossberg 500, Maverick, Win 1300, or Rem 870 express.

    I also think for a carry gun, the Hi-point is awfully heavy and bulky, but anything else I might recommend (SAR K2P) is going to run another 50-60 bucks, and sometimes that extra $50 just can’t be squeezed into the budget.

    And Poor People have the right to self defense…

  • Veteran Gunsmith at large

    I would rather rely on a Hi-Point 45 than a North American Arms mini revolver – the Hi-Point beats it in caliber effectiveness, price, and firepower. It even kicks most .380 pistols in those areas, the only thing is they are not pleasant to look at. You should never judge people because of their weaponry. A range I used to work at had a, “pimp pistol competition” – the weapon of choice was a Davis .25 ACP pistol in chrome with pearl grips. Everyone had one, and we’d get together on Wednesday evening and run the targets out to 50 feet and then shoot a single magazine group. The smallest group was the winner – strictly for fun and bragging rights. The guy who usually won was a retired Army Sergeant Major, and he could shoot a 2 inch group with that stupid little pop gun. He also shot his High Standard 22 at the same range – slow bullseye style fire, and every shot would be inside the bullseye, often in a less than one inch group. He could shoot amazingly no matter what the weapon.

  • Darren Hruska

    Sick Hi-Point brand Glock 40 Problem Solver you got there!

  • Ray

    I question the skill level of someone who can barely afford a $200 gun, in .45 ACP. They aren’t going to be able to shoot enough to become proficient.

  • Giolli Joker

    Uhm, good cheap gun.
    Let’s make it race ready with 2000$ of modifications!

    Seriously, nice, honest review. Thumbs up!

    • Matthew D Herrmann

      The frame is heavy as well. That eats up a lot of the felt recoil.

  • Hi-Points are cheap, ugly trash, but I’m sincerely glad they exist, because they’re cheap, and despite what a great many noisy upper class twits seem to think, po’ folk do in fact have the same rights as everyone else. A heavily armed peasantry is a nation’s best defense against totalitarianism, something apparently well-understood by totalitarian states throughout history, given how common a theme disarmament has been.

  • gunsandrockets

    Only 35 ounces with a blowback .45 pistol? And pleasant to shoot? That’s amazing.

    And barely over two benjamins to boot? We have our volksgun!

    • gunsandrockets

      Ah, too good to be true. I found this at American Rifleman…

      This handgun is listed as weighing 35 ozs. on the website. However, the .45 ACP pistol I received weighed in at 46.2 ozs. on a digital postal scale with an empty magazine inserted. Although this much weight makes the JHP45 a fairly hefty handgun to hold and haul, it does do a good job of keeping felt recoil under control.

      • Tim Pearce

        Yeah. Don’t fall in the water with one in your holster. 😉

      • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

        Mine weighed in at 41.6 ounces.

        • gunsandrockets

          Still pretty light for a dang blowback. But naughty Hi-Point for cooking the numbers.

          • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

            Could be a typo … those happen I hear.

  • Matthew D Herrmann

    I bought this exact model as my first handgun. I wanted something for home defense in .45acp that my fiance wouldn’t have too many issues using if need be. I did some research online and talked with a few of the guys behind the counter. One well meaning clerk insisted I try the Smith & Wesson M&P. $300 was my max on total budget including ammo, so the M&P was going to be a stretch, but only a few tears would be shed. The M&P was so light, my first thought was “this is a toy.” That’s what made my mind up on the hi-point. It’s heavy and clunky; because of that it requires a level of intentionality that I wanted in my first handgun. I realized when I picked up the S&W, that I wanted my first hand gun to always remind me that it was a weapon and nothing else.

    I didn’t buy anything on that visit, the clerk started talking about the crazy FBI and ammo capacity trumps all. The next store I went to, I asked the guy about the hi-point and he said “I can’t tell you not to buy it. It’s not a bad gun for the price, and I never see them come back through the door.” We talked a bit more about it, and I walked out the door with a new hi-point, 20 rounds of federal hydroshock, and 200 rounds of Blazer Brass for under $250US (with a hardcase thrown in for free!). I went to the range that weekend and had the time of my life.

    I’m closing in on 500 rounds now and have only had two issues with the gun ever. One was a failure to feed, that ended up being caused by a dirty magazine. At least I think it was that, since it’s never done it again after a thorough cleaning. The second issue is that my HI-point doesn’t seem to like anything besides Blazer Brass. Winchester White Box seems to tumble when I fire it, and that occasionally happened with the Sellier and Bellot and Fiocchi ammo, though not as often.

    I’ve been happy with it. I’ve had a blast learning to shoot and make it out to the range roughly once a month. It’s not a carry gun and I knew going in that I would eventually outgrow it. Either moving up to something more “respectable” for a handgun, or moving away from handguns entirely because it just wasn’t for me. I seem to have a thing for heavy guns with big calibers and small capacity, as I’m saving up to buy a six-shot .357 now.

    • Tim Pearce

      For your next, you might consider a metal framed gun. There are some companies still making them for lower prices, but they’re still not on par with “reputable” companies. That’ll give you the heft that you seem to like, and, if you choose well, a better fit and function.
      Also, (if you can find one!) a Ruger P95 would get you a gun about the same size as a Hi-Point, but a *much* greater reputation for reliability.

      • Matthew D Herrmann

        Thanks for the suggestions, I’ll keep them in mind!

      • Andrew Miller

        Ruger P95 is a polymer framed gun.
        But.
        It is also is in the “no parts available except for springs from Wolff” camp, having not been produced in almost a decade and replaced by the SR9 pistol.
        So, better hope it doesn’t break.

  • Ben Loong

    I feel that the Hi-Point JHP is a gun that would fit perfectly in some kind of dystopian alternate history setting where function and reliability trumped all other considerations.

    Or a post-apocalyptic one for that matter. I can just imagine some Mad Max-type protagonist carrying one of these.

    • jay

      Really?

  • jerry young

    Making fun of high point is more than fun it’s fact I would never own one, I’ve personally know 3 people that have owned them in all 3 cases they were junk, my brother bought one after shooting 50 rounds threw it it would only fire about half the time the slide was so sloppy it felt as if it was going to fall off, he returned it for their great warranty and it came back worse that when he sent it, the other two had a variety of similar problems in all three cases they couldn’t get rid of them fast enough, then there’s the one a friend of mine speaks of where a friend of hers was bragging about the great deal he got and went to show it to her new never out of the box when he racked the slide to show her it was unloaded the slide broke off, no making fun of high point is more than fun it’s justified! now on to glock, did glock have high point design their new gun? they had to recall them for the slide falling off, is glock to become the new high point? just to let you know the only thing I have against glock is the placement of the safety on the trigger without another external safety, I carry a Springfield XD Mod2 with the trigger safety and a passive grip safety not that I agree with the trigger safety at least there is still another means of diminishing the chance of accidental discharge due to trigger contact! other than that I have heard high point makes a great rifle so maybe that’s what they should stick too!

    • Tim Pearce

      No. They don’t make a great rifle. I’ve owned one. TL;DR: It was great only in how badly they managed to screw up making a gun.
      It came with a cheap faux weaver rail that you could replace the rear sight assembly with. Doing so is how we found out that one of the screws had been cross-threaded. Thankfully, we had the means to re-tap that hole. Mine predated the new “target” model that has a weird springy recoil pad to absorb the recoil (yes, a pistol-cartridge carbine *does* have recoil, and probably more than you’d expect).
      If you take it apart to clean, a few parts almost invariably leap out of the gun, but strangely only the first time. As these parts are basically the trigger mechanism, that isn’t a very nice feeling.
      The trigger was abysmal. It was a step worse than gritty and it was inconsistent.
      After about 5,000 rounds, the cheap coating they sprayed on all of the internal parts started flaking off of the feed ramp, leading it to be extremely picky in terms of what bullets it would feed. That’s when I decided to replace it. Yes, I’m aware that most people will never fire 5,000 rounds through a single gun. I’m also aware that those 5,000 rounds were more expensive than the gun in the first place.
      I couldn’t have been happier when some guy brought a Beretta CX4, in the same chambering, in to the gun store I worked for, to sell. I sold that Hi-Point so fast, the cash I got for it was slightly singed.

      • jerry young

        Thanks for clearing that up I never shot a high point rifle or known anyone who owned one and was only going on hearsay, I have shot their pistols and they are junk!

    • RocketScientist

      …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

      Here… you forgot these ^^^

  • Cesare Renzi

    A .45 blowback? I wouldn’t mind to try shooting one.

    • Tim Pearce

      You won’t mind until you’ve been holding one up at arm’s length for fifteen minutes. 😉

      • Cesare Renzi

        Welp, I only shoot flattened trees so it’s not really an issue… This thing has really got me curious.

  • Tim Pearce

    Will Hi-Points fire if you drop them, as Millenniums do? (I.E. I’ll step up to the plate and be the Taurus Hater).
    I used to be a Taurus fan boy. They were legitimately pushing the envelope quite a bit at that time.
    Then, for years, I was a Taurus Apologist. “Yeah, they cut corners here and there, but you should be testing any new gun you buy to make sure it’s working right, and Taurus has that great warranty.”
    Then that class-action lawsuit hit, with its proof that Taurus was so incompetent that they’d skimp on the one safety that literally every firearm produced should have (drop safety) in order to cut costs. This, added to years of seeing Taurus firearms I’d sold coming back for warranty work (at times that number being about HALF of the guns sold). If I could find a way to apologize to every customer I sold a Taurus to, I would do so, because I really and honestly wish I hadn’t.

    • Hoplopfheil

      I wouldn’t recommend somebody buy a used MilPro, but the 24/7 G2 or Millennium G2 should be safer.

      Should.

    • jay

      I think his point was, there are plenty of inexpensive, perfectly reliable firearms out there, that don’t compete with a Desert Eagle in size and weight, and magazine capacity (the hi point does not have the quality or functionality of the Desert Eagle). You get what you pay for. A hi point is a night stand gun (for someone who won’t shoot, or is really really cheap), or a pistol to train a person you don’t like, how to shoot. There are at least a dozen firearms on the market today that are almost as inexpensive, are better quality, and have a resale value. Or just buy a used revolver.

    • John

      You shouldn’t have to apologize for Taurus. Taurus should be apologizing to you, and everyone else, by making SAFE and RELIABLE firearms.

  • MrEllis

    This is the first pistol you can craft in any given game.

  • The Irredeemable Raven

    Hi Points are like Kel Tec’s and RIA’s…people rag on them until they actually use them.

    • Tim Pearce

      I’ve shot each. The RIA is fine. The other two I will continue to rag on.

    • Porty1119

      Nothing against HiPoint, and I own (and love!) an RIA. Kel-Tec is going a bit far though.

  • DanGoodShot

    Hi-point. Because a low bore axis is for poossies.
    Honestly though, If it was all I could afford, it really is not a bad option. It is certainly better then nothing and hey, it’s better than an R51!

    • ozzallos .

      Shots fired.

    • jay

      Check out Alex C’s review of the R51. I’d rather have it than a hi point.

      • DanGoodShot

        I saw it when it came out. It wasnt so good for the R51. Its also only one review. I go by several video and written reviews. As well as people with hands on experience. From all of that. The Hi-point comes out on top in dependability. Ok…. that is about the ONLY point it comes out on top. Lol. But, to me, thats the most important. The r51 is far too picky when it comes to ammo. What happens when you have an r51 and all you can get is steel case ammo or lighter loads?

        • jay

          Well in that type of situation, I’d rather rely, on my other pistols and rifles (many different calibers, different uses). As you have to diversify for teotwaki. You must get the best your money can buy, most reliable, and most easily repaired (by yourself, and parts and ammo availability). A hi point carbine might work, but I’d still rely on something else for pistol self defense. Now if someone wants it, to sit in their night stand, it’s on them. I’d just never recommend one to someone for self defense. Specially If I cared for them. ;-}

          • DanGoodShot

            I could not agree more. Boxes checked in all different, but most common calibers as well. But… then again.. the Hi-point does have other uses too. If it malfunctions you can throw it, use it as a weight, an anchor, a hammer, a club, a meat tenderizer… After all, it makes a hell of a brick. Its like the Swiss army knife of sfth/teotwaki situations. With that, how could you not insist that people buy it.

          • jay

            All those uses. I was just blinded by it’s looks. I guess it’s time to invest in their stocks. Then I could insist on people buying it. ;-}

          • jay

            As I said, I’d not recommend one to anyone I cared about. ;-}

      • MarkVShaney

        Serious question- have you owned or fired either?

        • jay

          Not owned, but fired both.

        • jay

          Never owned either. Fired both. The R51 was a bit finicky, once you found the right ammo, there were no issues. Comfortable, pretty accurate, and concealable. The hi point sucked, and was fairly inaccurate, with the heavy slide slamming around, sight realignment was a labor. Small magazine capacity at such a large size, was ridiculous. What about you? You an anti R51’er, and a hi point fan boy?

  • Pseudo

    It’s not like Hi-Point is incapable of putting out something functional. I’m glad to see that they aren’t all garbage. Every one I’ve had personal experience with (don’t know models, sorry) happened to actually be garbage for what it’s worth. One couldn’t properly cycle like ~70% of the time and the other liked to disgorge the magazine on every third shot. Maybe this will drive down competitor pricing eventually. “If Hi-Point can do it for $200, why am I paying $XXX for this YYYY.”

    • RocketScientist

      That’s bizarre. I’ve put probably thousands of rounds down the pipe of hi-points (either one of the two I’ve owned over the years or one of the 2 or 3 in my friends collections) and I’ve never once had any failure of any kind. Sucks you got a lemon. Good news is, you can send it back to them (if it doesn’t fit in the box you want to use, you can just cut it in half and cram it in there) and they’ll just send you a brand new one. Lather, rinse, repeat until youg et a good one (though in my experience, yours was the exception to the rule, pretty damn good odds your first exchange will run flawlessly).

  • Disarmed in CA

    This is the only Hi-Point pistol I would purchase. Of COURSE it is not on the CA Roster.

  • Raginzerker

    “attractive easy-grip finish” this is a perfect example of “beauty is in the eye of the beholder”

  • Edwin Calhoun

    THANK YOU FOR GIVING THE WEAPON A FAIR REVIEW… I OWN ONE AND WHEN I TRAVEL IN MY STATE IT GOES WITH ME….NEVER HAD A PROBLEM EITHER…..GOOD SHOOTER…

  • C.

    I have an H&K P30L and a Hi-Point. Are they in the same class? Nope. Will either get the job done? Absolutely. There’s nothing wrong with the Hi-Point and if someone doesn’t have the disposable income and needs something for protection, the Hi-Point is definitely an option. The main reason why I have a Hi-Point is for someone to use when I take them to the range.

  • Chris Johnson

    I have a Hi-Point .40. I have fired over 3000 rounds through it with no malfunctions at all. Very dependable and fairly accurate. Glad to see someone give it a good review.

  • Otto Heimler

    It’s what I pack in my glove box very reliable.

  • codfilet

    I never really thought much about Hi-points until I read this thread-now I’m intrigued, and I’ll likely pick one up soon. It’s apparently quite reliable, It’s made by Americans, and it’s inexpensive. What’s not to like?

  • Tim

    I have several (like a bunch) of these that I keep buying at auctions because they’re so darn cheap and I can’t resist a $60 .45ACP. So there’s something to be said for a lousy reputation.
    On the flip side. My son is the elitist and shakes his head everytime a new one shows up. His major point is (in his not so humble opinion) they don’t last long before losing accuracy or malfunctioning. IOW they wear out quick.
    I haven’t shot all mine, but they are in various states of wear and disrepair. I can say that l’ve had very few issues test firing them and it’s usually a broken or bent part I didn’t notice.
    Never taken them up on the lifetime warranty, but it’s hard to beat $8 factory magazines. I’d rather have one of these than a SoCal Sat Nite Special, especially if it’s left locked in the car at night.

  • Melvin

    If someone is going to judge another person;s worth based on the name brand of pistol that is in the person’s hands, I do not legitimately feel they have a mature enough mindset so can trust them 100% to be safe with a gun. These are likely the kind of people who inadvertedly point a loaded weapon at others without thinking.

    When anyone, for any reason, starts to belittle any firearm, they are obviously equating the gun with less respect than what is due to a weapon that can cause death. If a legitimate review is done with data showing factual evidence of firearm inferiority – this falls into the category of research and not childish belittling.

    Just how much do YOU trust a person, gun in hand, who is acting in such an immature manner?

    • Tim

      Nuff said…
      Even if he was packing this, I don’t think I’d trash his weapon choice.

  • Martin frank

    Buddy of mine had the .380 hipoint, what a steaming pile. Jammed constantly every mag, and when it did cycle corectly you couldnt hit anything. Pure garbage. He “sold” it and got a xd fullsize in .40. This author conveniently left out the part where you need a hammer and punch just to field strip the weapon as well.

  • Colt Seavers

    I don’t have any experience with Hi-Point pistols but I did pick up one of their 45 carbines and was pretty impressed with it for the price.(New around 300 bucks 3 years ago) It is fun to shoot and goes bang every time regardless of the type of ammo fed through it. Decent HD gun.

  • Patrick R. – Senior Writer

    I always found it odd that the poster above didn’t include a single rifle. Seems like there would have at least been a shotgun or a .22 rifle in there.

    • Beju

      I would guess that no brands with fewer than 40 recoveries are listed, since that what the two lowest brands are represented with. There are probably at least a few RG revolvers that get recovered each year, but not in big numbers since the new RG faucet has been shut off for quite some time.

  • Stephen Paraski

    Son has the carbine in 9 and 1000 rounds through it no problem. We carry Glocks though and when I worked the streets of Detroit my PDC was a Combat Commander that saved my life twice. Practice, practice, practice with what you carry every day.