The Mauser 1914 Pistol

Mauser is much more well known for their long guns than their hand guns, but in this installment of TFBTV we look at a very prolific early 20th century handgun made by the Mauser company in significant quantities. This is the Mauser 1914, which was a very popular pistol back in the day.

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Alex C.

Alex is a Senior Writer for The Firearm Blog and Director of TFBTV.


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  • Poresz Poreszovics Poreszov

    At first sight, the automatic slide release sounds good. On second thought, it not seems absolute safe and comfortable. As far as I know, the slide can’t be released as the Walther PP’s slide, for example. When the slide locks open after the last shot and you want unload the gun, at first, you must remove the empty magazine, and after that, you must reinsert the empty magazine to release the slide, and finally you can remove the magazine. There is possibility of error. I think the Mauser 1914, 1934, and HSc really needs an external slide release lever.

    • iksnilol

      Or you can just let the slide stay locked back?

  • Matt

    I have one, but the slide lock is apparently broken. The slide won’t hold back on an empty mag, and thus i can’t field strip it to get to the broken part. Any ideas how to fix?

    • Bill T

      Should be able to hold the slide back as you remove the spring guide and barrel, then let the slide go forward slowly with the magazine out of the gun. Should give you access to the insides.

  • Blab

    We, as in the world, still dislike Alex c. Please remove him from you list of writers, he is pretty much just a tool.

    • Tim johnson

      Heck yea he is!!

      • Timmy

        No he’s not!! Oh wait you mean Alex? Yea he’s pretty much a hammer being used to pound in screws. The wrong TOOL.

        • AC97

          Are you talking to yourself?

          • ostiariusalpha

            Isn’t it sad? If only he had some real world friends.

          • AC97

            A little, but it’s mostly funny.

          • I can see his IP address. Same guy thats been doing it for a while.
            I find it funny.

          • AC97

            What a loser.

          • Johnny

            My apologies Alex. From this point on I will refrain from mindlessly heckling you and only bring cohesive arguments to your attention.

  • Videostar

    Good gun, bad writer.

  • Broz

    My dad had one in .32 ACP which I foolishly pawned and forgot about until it was too late…

  • somethingclever

    Love these posts. Keep up the good work.

  • Swede

    I understand it’s just one troll with a sad life an nothing else to do.

    However, I want to take this opportunity to complement Alex C for his excellent postings.
    I really like the factual and bravado free attitude in his work. Too many internet gun guys try to look cool while displaying a lack of knowledge. Alex’ deep and geeky expertise is what makes me come back to TFB every day.

    Keep up the great work!

  • Bob

    It’s so whiddle!

    (I dunno, I just was surprised when Alex reached down and picked it up…)

  • Lew Siffer

    And you can buy really cool aftermarket accessories to turn it into a carbine for your uncle.

  • retfed

    I like seeing and learning about historical firearms that aren’t 1911s, so I truly enjoy the videos Alex C. puts up. One of the things I like is the variations that different makers tried with safeties, takedown procedures, etc., in the days before they became pretty standardized. The newer ways may be more ergonomic, but the old ways are fairly ingenious, even if they don’t stand the test of time. (Except for Nambus. They just suck.)

  • vwVwwVwv

    @ Alex C.
    It may interest you.
    Found YOU on HAARETZ.

    The Man Who Brought Us the Uzi Dies
    Uziel Gal was born to a German WWI pilot with a love for arms. The result would be the world’s most recognizable submachine gun.
    read more: http://www.haaretz.com/jewish/this-day-in-jewish-history/1.740562