Hornady Introduces Patented “4DOF” Ballistic Calculator

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While ballistic calculators have largely removed much of the math skills that were required to shoot long range, they have become quite the handy tool making long-range shooting accessible (and enjoyable) for those not steeped in ballistic mysticisms. Stepping up to take more mystery out of long-range shooting is Hornady, with the latest update to their ballistic calculator program dubbed “4DOF” for “Four Degrees of Freedom.”

The new calculator takes a different mathematical approach than common calculators, using the drag coefficient rather than the ballistic coefficient. Further, as Hornady makes the bullets, the calculator includes “…the exact physical modelling of the projectile and its mass and aerodynamic properties.” Further, the program also takes into effect the vertical shirt as bullets encounter a crosswind, a phenomena referred to as “aerodynamic jump”.

The 4DOF ballistic calculator is available for select Hornady, Berger, and Sierra projectiles across the 6mm, 6.5mm, 7mm, .338, and .300 bullet diameters. No word on the expansion of the program, but I would say its highly likely that 5.56 and other projectiles will be added in the future.

Hornady breaks down the “Fourth Degree” of Freedom:

“Current ballistic calculators provide three degrees of freedom in their approach; windage, elevation and range, but treat the projectile as an inanimate lump flying through the air,” said Dave Emary, Hornady Chief Ballistician. “This program incorporates the projectile’s movement in the standard 3 degrees but also adds its movement about its center of gravity and subsequent angle relative to its line of flight, which is the fourth degree of freedom.”

The best part? The Hornady 4DOF is complete free for anyone to use. Check out the 4DOF website here. 

 

 



Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • gunsandrockets

    “Further, the program also takes into effect the vertical shirt as bullets encounter a crosswind…”

    Vertical shirt? Is that like the shoulder thing which goes up? (I kid! I kid!)

    Don’t you just hate autocorrect?;-)

    • Dallas Doc

      also, you meant “account,” not “effect; and fyi: “phenomena” is plural, you meant the singular: “phenomenon.” (I do luv ya and your articles.)

  • Anonymous

    Doubt that they’ll tell us, but does the program account for fleet yaw effects as shown by research in recent years?

    • FightFireJay

      A non-predictable phenomenon. It would be like trying to derive a mathematical formulation to predict barrel harmonics.