Modern Intermediate Full Power Calibers 018: The 7.62x54mmR Russian

.30 caliber rounds: .30-06 M2 AP, .303 Mk. VII, 7.5x54 Balle C, 7.9x57 sS Patrone, 7.62x54R LPS Ball, 7.62x51 NATO S Patrone (Austria).

.30 caliber rounds: .30-06 M2 AP, .303 Mk. VII, 7.5x54 Balle C, 7.9x57 sS Patrone, 7.62x54R LPS Ball, 7.62x51 NATO S Patrone (Austria).

Modern? Sure, but let’s take a step back… Way back. It’s 1890 and smokeless powder has just been invented. There’s this guy named Rubin going around and spreading the gospel of the small caliber, high velocity .30″ bore round. You’re in Imperial Russia; what’s your country to do to keep up with this new tide of ammunition innovation?

Why, adopt what would become the longest-serving and most venerable military caliber in the history of the metallic cartridge, of course: The 7.62x54mmR.

With a century and a quarter of service with its home nation, the 7.62x54mmR has a whole lot more history than we want to get into in this humble ballistics article. What’s important is that the caliber has stayed extremely relevant despite its age and superficial obsolescence, and some small arms ammunition theorists even consider it the “round to beat” when it comes to the decision on the next generation caliber configuration.

If any caliber has proved itself, it’s the older Russian 7.62mm, but ballistically, how does it stack up to the NATO-standard 7.62x51mm? Let’s find out:

(Note, I’ve added two data lines that weren’t present in the original 7.62 NATO article; those are M80 Ball from a 24″ barrel, as well as the Mk. 316 175gr sniper round.)

DGhC3Ch eMsSDJ5 rSccNDI dLlXP9p

It’s obvious how cluttered the graphs are – this is an indication that we’re talking about some very similar ballistics between the two rounds. In fact, with similar bullet weights, the ballistic performance of the 7.62x54mmR and 7.62 NATO is virtually indistinguishable. With lighter projectiles, the 7.62mm NATO tends to have higher muzzle velocities and better performance, but the gap closes almost completely when both are loaded with heavier projectiles. However, there are some important differences beyond that: First, the 7.62x54mmR comes loaded with a few different ammunition types that the 7.62 NATO lacks, for example the excellent B-32 Armor Piercing Incendiary round. Second, the Russian caliber features steel bullet jackets which can improve the long-range penetration of the round versus the gilding-metal-jacketed 7.62 NATO, especially if a heavy load like the antique 183gr D Ball is used. This means, in theory, that the 7.62x54mmR is perhaps the better machine gun round, while the 7.62 NATO is, thanks to its shorter overall length and rimless case, the superior magazine-fed rifle round.

In terms of weight, the brass cased 7.62 NATO is a little behind, at about 24 grams for the ~147gr varieties, while 7.62x54mmR steel cased 148gr ammunition clocks in at about 22.2 grams.

Still, the differences between the two rounds is slight, and functionally they are pretty much identical. Even though I don’t agree with Jim Schatz that the 7.62x54R SVD and PKM are 1,200m wonder-weapons, I can’t argue with him about the proven effectiveness of the most venerable metallic cartridge ever developed.

Note: All ballistic calculations are done with JBM’s Trajectory calculator, using the ballistic coefficient appropriate to the projectile being modeled. Also, keep in mind that there is no single true velocity for a given round; velocity can vary due to a large number of factors, including ambient temperature and chamber dimensions. Instead, I try to use nominal velocity figures that are representative of the capability of the round in question.



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He can be reached via email at nathaniel.f@staff.thefirearmblog.com.


Advertisement

  • micmac80

    If you ask a manufacturer like Lapua which is better round answer will be 7.62x54R is the better round with superior inernal and external balistics and more growth potential.

    And yes SVD and PKM are wonder weapons ,combining full power round with lightweight like no other . On M240 they are now playing with titanium recievers to get anywhere near PKM weight ,

    • Anonymoose

      The 54R really shines when you use it for handloading. Most factory “sniper” and “match” rounds are still designed to be shot from a 91/30, and you can see in these tables that they lack compared to standard 7.62 NATO, so it always irks me when someone says it has “.30-06 baliistics.”

      • Well, in theory it does have .30-06 ballistics, and a lot of commercial ammo is loaded that hot, but the military stuff is solidly comparable to 7.62 NATO.

        • Anonymoose

          In theory .30-06, .303, and .308/7.62×51 NATO are the same, but only because Garand loads and BP Enfield loads are not representative of handloading to case capacity with modern powders (or even the 1940s powders that enabled the same performance as the older cartridges out of the 7.62 NATO).

          • Handloading .303 British to hotter than what military ammo will do is in my experience difficult, unless you’re compressing loads.

          • Anonymoose

            Sure, if you don’t want to blow up your Enfield…

          • Well, that and a load of propellant with the right burn rate pretty much fills up the case…

          • Kivaari

            One way to make your .303 brass last longer and hold more powder is to neck size only. Most of the Enfield rifles I had allowed the case to fire form into an “improved” case shape that allowed extra powder if desired (I didn’t). By full length resizing the cases they tended to wear out faster, having case head separations much faster. Loading data has always been on the low side for both the .303 and the Russian round. American loaders being a bit afraid of old rifles getting stuffed with full power ammunition. As long as you keep brass separated in both calibers to just one rifle, or those that accept the neck sized only cases the brass lasts longer in both models.

          • iksnilol

            I always prefer milder loads simply to make the brass last longer.

          • Giolli Joker

            Let’s bring on the 8mm Mauser that shines in that photo, then. 🙂

      • Sermon 7.62

        Factory “sniper” rounds are designed to be shot from the SVD.

        • Anonymoose

          Yeah, but we never get any real SVD ammo except 7N1.

          • Sermon 7.62

            7N1 was adopted in 1966.

          • Anonymoose

            Doesn’t mean any of the newer military-issue sniper rounds are available to us, even for testing.

          • Sermon 7.62

            And the rifles are not permitted to import. But the rounds can be purchased. The Russians replaced 7N1 in the 1990’s, and it is being sold as surplus.

        • iksnilol

          Doesn’t help much when you can’t get that ammo outside of Russia.

          • Sermon 7.62

            7N1 is, as far as I know, available in the US, although it’s surplus from the 1990’s.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, not very easy to get in the US. And even harder in Europe.

  • Matt

    The rim on the 7.62x54r is its fatal flaw. While it may not be an issue for belt fed weapons, the rim makes it undesirable for a magazine fed weapon. If, like the U.S., you want the option to have other weapons share ammo with the gpmg’s (7.62×51, of course) then a rimmed cartridge is not suitable. The 7.62x54r is a technical dinosaur coasting on logistical inertia.
    I know this is outside the scope of the article but it is important to remember that a round is more than just its ballistics.

    • Anonymoose

      Oh but it is an issue for belt-fed weapons. PK, SG43, and PM1910 feeding systems are a lot more complex than the “push-through” systems on most modern GPMGs and LMGs. The Russians will drop the 54R in the next couple decades, I think. They are starting to adopt more and more guns in .308.

      • Ken

        Oddly enough, the Finns were looking at making an MG42 in 7.62x54R, push through feed and all. They made a few prototypes. The Czech UK59 is also push through feed.

        • Anonymoose

          Seriously? How does that even work?

          • Sermon 7.62

            Dude, these pics are irrelevant.

          • Anonymoose

            How else would you get a rimmed case through a link? Flexible links?

      • Giolli Joker

        “Rimmed for the extractor’s pleasure!” (D. Ashley)
        More complex or not, the PKM is among the most reliable MGs in its category while keeping the weight relatively light.

        • iksnilol

          Relatively? It is the lightest .30 caliber MG you can get.

          • Anonymoose

            The Mk48 is only a quarter pound heavier than the PKP, and it retains the quick-change barrel and has a handguard.

          • iksnilol

            Yeah, but the PKP is way heavier than the PKM.

          • Tritro29

            But at the expense of many a compromise including barrel length…

      • Jackson Andrew Lewis

        i have not seen the sussians adopt anything in 308….. only western caliubres i have heard for them ever adopting were the 9×19 and the .338 lapua for some marksman rifles…..

        • Anonymoose

          They are using it internally, but not with military units. Some OMON units adopted the Arctic Warfare and the domestic ORSIS T5000 in .308. OMON also has a thing for foreign handguns like Glocks, CZ75s, and Beretta 92s.

    • Tritro29

      But we do, and somehow it even works (SVD/PK/SV, PSL, R-variant of AO27) well.

      Also the round has been tested in many configurations with the rim, while rimless cases have been pushed through (Unified 6×49, 6.5x54PS etc). This thing is unkillable and provides enough effect on target as not to be taken down.

    • Kivaari

      Really it isn’t since it is in the weapons it needs to be in. The PKM and the SVD both work well and there really is no need to adopt a new bolt action or other self loading rifle in that cartridge. There doesn’t seem to be a rush to adopt a new x54mm self loading rifle anywhere. The 5.45mm like the 5.56mm is the main infantry rifle and the specialty rifles, like our updated M14s is the SVD. Both are DMR or “sniper rifles”. I don’t see the Russians wanting to resurrect the M40 rifles anytime soon.

  • Anonymoose

    You know what I’d like? A 54R version of the CMMG Mutant. Just stretch it out from the Mk3/AR10 platform and make it take Vepr mags.

    • Giolli Joker

      Uhm… That rim would eat a lot of bolt face, I guess.

      • Anonymoose

        Less than one millimeter more than a WSM…

  • datimes

    Never gave much thought to a 125 year old cartridge that could be about as good as anything manufactured today. And it’s inexpensive.

    • ostiariusalpha

      It’s not. A bigger cartridge that only manages to be on par with a smaller cartridge is not impressive. But it is cheap, at least until the surplus gets used up.

      • Newly manufactured Wolf and Brown Bear is still much cheaper than almost anything in .308.

        • Anonymoose

          And the rifles are (or were, if you can find them in stock anywhere) cheaper than pretty much any bargain-bin .308, but with that comes crappy sights, bad ergos, and limited scope options without some smithing.

          • Tritro29

            And you’re stuck with Molot for the time being. On the optics subject, it’s more complicated, but I understand that “Eastern optics” tend to be a painful experience during training for people who have been used to Mil Dot.

        • ostiariusalpha

          Almost anything except steel cased .308. Apples to apples, .308 is always cheaper.

          • More like apples to compost. Steel cased .308 tends to be bottom of the barrel ammo. Modern manufactured steel cased 7.62x54R is pretty decent.

          • ostiariusalpha

            Sure it is, because no one has ever complained that Wolf 7.62x54R is crap.

          • How much of it (Wolf 7.62x54R) do you shoot in an average year?

          • ostiariusalpha

            That question is irrelevant, you can find complaints about the precision of Wolf 7.62x54R versus surplus very easily if you make the slightest effort to look, amongst other things.

          • I’d ask the same of them. It’s always some internet “guniphishiado” bashing something they don’t regularly shoot because they read about it somewhere. Go buy about 500 or so rounds (it’s fairly cheap), shoot it, repeat that a few more times, then come back and tell me your thoughts. Until then, your opinion is the only thing irrelevant to me.

          • ostiariusalpha

            Cool story, bro. Or you could actually look up the complaints by regular Mosin shooters that find the Wolf annoyingly inferior to surplus ammo, your choice.

          • Or I can just continue to shoot my own and go by those experiences.

          • ostiariusalpha

            Solipsism, first refuge of the incompetent; good choice.

          • I’m hardly that. I simply prefer the advice of the experienced over that of the vicarious, of which you admittedly are by your own words…at least on this particular topic.

          • ostiariusalpha

            Where did I admit that I don’t regularly shoot Wolf 7.62x54R? Seems like you have trouble with objectively interpreting what people say to you. That’s a character flaw you might want to work on.

          • You didn’t, that was the point. I don’t have trouble being objective. I ask you a specific question and you chose not to give a specific answer. At that point I made the conscious decision to treat your comment as BS instead of looking at it objectively. I’m not sure why you are so butt hurt over me, a person you don’t even know, not caring about your opinion. Maybe the working of one’s charter flaws should be something you should consider fine Sir.

          • ostiariusalpha

            “Charter flaws”… LOL! You are a funny little man.

  • Tritro29

    POS round that doesn’t want to die. The ammunition twin-brother of Fidel Castro. It has bottlenecked the machine gun development for ages. Litterally. But it’s so nice to see it home in some ugly face or pelvis. You know as the saying goes, it is maybe a lemon comrade, but it is our lemon.

    Now seriously, this is right there with the M2HB and the M1911 pistol. Glorious dinosaurs.

    • Sermon 7.62

      The rimmed case could be replaced, as far as I understand. But it’s good for belt-fed machine guns, isn’t it?

      • Nagurski

        Not really. If you look at the difference between western disintegrating link belts and the Soviet PKM belts, it should be obvious that the disintegrating ones are better. With those, all you have to do to feed a round is push it forwards. With the PKM, the bolt has to pull a round back to get it out of the belt and then push it forwards into the chamber. Plus you have a belt that is always hanging off the end of the gun and is more complicated to manufacture. The PKM has to use the worse belt system because of that rim on the 7.62x54R.

        • ostiariusalpha

          To be fair, there are push-through belt links for 7.62x54R.

          • Amplified Heat

            And also better options than the PK (referring to the UK59, here)

          • Tritro29

            Debatable.

        • Tritro29

          Frangible belts are better? From a military standpoint, using Frangible belts means you will have to be stocked or you’ll have to win fast, because logistics are going to be a b****. I’ve seen the two and from the grunts perspective, the continuous links are part of the success of the PKM, not its flaws.

          But horses for courses.

      • iksnilol

        Is good for the MG, more reliable extraction and whatnot. But if you made the PKM use a rimless round like 308 you could save 1 kg of weight.

        That’s what happened when they made a PKM in 6mm UMG.

  • James Young

    Seems to be a lot of hostility toward this round in the comments

    • Nashvone

      I doubt it’s so much hostility toward the round but the most common rifle that fires it. Love it or hate it, Mosin Nagants have chewed through millions of these rounds.

      • Hinermad

        It’s fun to shoot from a PSL. That’s not a great rifle either, but it looks cool.

    • Anonymoose

      I love it. It’s my favorite round.

    • Sermon 7.62

      Hei, it’s Russian.

  • BrandonAKsALot

    I’ve always enjoyed the 54r, but the powder in the surplus is very slow and even burning (which is good and bad), and the rim really does sort of kill much of it’s potential for a resurgence. With modern powders, it could be turned into a hell of a precision cartridge. I just really dislike the Mosin. Well, the 91/30 anyway. I had planned to grab a Vepr in 54r, but with the dry up of surplus, .308 seems more sensible.

  • Kalash

    I don’t agree with Jim Schatz that the 7.62x54R SVD and PKM are 1,200m wonder-weapons.

    Don’t agree?

    Try talking to guys who took fire from those weapons from Mujis up in the hills.

    • Sermon 7.62

      The longest recorded sniper kill using non-magnum cartridges belongs to a Russian sniper, and that’s 1,350 m from the SVD rifle. That’s a fact. But, according to the stats and ballistic tables, the range for SVD is 300 m for a headshot and 600 m for a chest target.

      • iksnilol

        Can we get a source on that?

        I always liked the SVD but never expected .308 or 7.52x54R to go as far as 1350 meters.

        • Sermon 7.62

          See “Longest recorded sniper kills” and “Soviet snipers in Afghanistan, 1979 – 1989”.

          You can trust the source or not, but according to the ballistic tables, i.e “The Shooter’s Manual” from the 1970’s, it takes 5 shots to hit a standing man from 1,300 m using the SVD, thus, a sniper has about 20% chance of success.

    • Ben Warren

      Unless the Mujis also brought MG3s and M240 machine guns along, that is hardly a scientific comparison.

      • Tritro29

        They brought along Pakistani MG3’s and they weren’t exactly shining in adverse conditions.

    • That proves that the x54R is the superior long range round to the 7.62 NATO how, exactly?

      • Tritro29

        I would like to know as well.

      • Kivaari

        I don’t think he looked at the graphs you posted.

    • Kivaari

      It wasn’t due to superior fire power, but the advantage of being on the high ground so much of the time. Since our forces usually occupied positions at the bottom of the punch bowls, where the villages are, gave an immediate advantage to the enemy.

  • Sermon 7.62

    Nice post, Nate.

    Like I said before, this is the best round and no one asked me to explain that. So, this is the best round. Because it is used for SVD. And SVD is the best rifle, right?

    • AC97

      How does this post prove that 7.62x54R is the best exactly? I must’ve missed that part.

  • Arie Heath

    I personally love this round, probably because the only center fire rifle I own is a Mosin. It’s a cheap, reasonably powerful cartridge that is readily available. I’ve taken my fair share of bucks with that rifle.

  • Bob

    I like 7.62x54R. It makes wonderful holes in steel plates. Absolute best I’ve got for that purpose, using the greatest Russian weapon ever made, the Mosin Nagant! Even my beloved Lee Enfield can’t compare in that category, though it is close. I believe the Urban Dictionary states the Mosin Nagant is appropriate for killing a polar bear, the tree behind the polar bear, and the boulder beyond that.

    And the Mosin haters approach…

    • SlowJoeCrow

      And that immediately proves the urban dictionary post is full of it, because polar bears don’t live where there are trees. Also fwiw the 2 Western armed forces most likely to encounter polar bears use .303 British (to be replaced by 7.62×51), and .30-06 Springfield. That said, if there is a Russian equivalent to the Arctic Rangers or Sirius Sledge Patrol, they probably have Mosin Nagant rifles that are probably just as effective against polar bears as a Lee-Enfield or Pattern 1917.

      • Bob

        Are you suggesting Urban Dictionary is not a reliable source?!?! The humanity!

        Anyway, yeah, .303, 7.62×51, 7.62x54R, 7.92×57, .30-06, all have put large animals including polar bears down quite nicely. I like the random people online in discussions about the effectiveness of .303 saying that since the cartridge and Lee Enfield was standard throughout the British Empire as they sought to conquer the world with it, it would be hard to find an animal on this planet that HASN’T been killed by a Lee Enfield in .303 British at one time or another. I imagine 7.62x54R and Mosins cannot be far behind in such a contest.

      • Major Tom

        I think the equivalent to the US Forest Service that goes around Siberia and the Arctic regions of Russia does carry such things.

        • Tritro29

          The SVD and Saigas reign supreme among other bolt actions like the Sobol’s.

        • Bob

          Oh, as I recall, soldiers in the Red Forest are issued with SVDs so they can protect scientists studying the radiation effects from Chernobyl from radioactive wild boar. Sounds like an excellent background set up for a horror movie, doesn’t it?

          • Google “cheeki breeki” or “strelok”.

          • Bob

            “What are you? What are you here?”

            Or if that wasn’t obvious enough, there is always the old “Get out of here Stalker!”

  • nagurski

    It amazes me that in the year 2016, the fourth highest funded military in the world is still using rimmed ammo in machineguns.

    • Tritro29

      … as does the second highest funded military…

  • roguetechie

    Rather than buying extraordinarily expensive M240L we should just buy the Yugo PKM chambered in 308 and still the weight of normal PKM, unlike the Polish versions.

    • iksnilol

      Um, Yugo PKM is a bit heavier than regular PKM.

      And as far as I know there’s no Yugo PKM in .308.

      • roguetechie

        My mistake,

        It’s Arsenal out of Bulgaria. Model MG-1MS.

        They do exist and aren’t any heavier. However I’m genuinely unsure of which links they use.

        The important part though is they exist, and unlike the Polish ones aren’t heavier.

        *I’d link but don’t want comment hell limbo

        The PKM is a timeless design, but this doesn’t mean I believe better can’t be done. I’m almost 100% sure a lighter gun that’s just as reliable is possible and chances are it will be cheaper to produce.

        • iksnilol

          Saw that one, it is still a kg heavier than regular PKM. In spite of that it is still lighter than most MGs.

          • roguetechie

            Is it a kg heavier? Well to clarify, is the 308 version a kg heavier than the x54r version?

            Honestly, there’s gotta be a fairly simple way to make a pull out feed work with 308. Maybe the combination hasn’t been found yet, but i’m almost certain it could be accomplished.

            I know for a fact though that there’s two feed arrangements that deal with belted ammo that’s rimless at substantially reduced weight. So even if pkm proved to be a dead end for rimless, options do exist that would allow much lighter machine guns than we have now.

          • iksnilol

            Nah, the non-original PKMs weigh more than the regular PKMs.

            Going to rimless should allow you to save a kg. That is, you could get a PKM in 308 to weigh 6.5 kg instead of the regular 7.5. Whilst many of the “foreign” PKMs (like Yugoslavian or Bulgarian or Polish) usually weigh around 8.5 kg.

          • roguetechie

            Ok, I did some quick fact checking before shooting my mouth off about this further.

            The reason I’m confident that pkm could be successfully made to fire 7.62 NATO and even use disintegrating link is because the M1919 Browning was made to fire both rimmed and rimless cartridges. It was also originally designed to use non disintegrating links, but could also use disintegrating links.

            It stands to reason that it’s therefore possible to do the same with a PKM. It might require a new top cover and a different bcg, but this really shouldn’t be the one monkey that stops the show.

            Like you said, if anything I’d think it could actually result in a lighter gun. Lord knows it would definitely result in lighter and smaller belt boxes for a given amount of ammunition.

            You’d think in an era of modern warfare where cubic volumes and weight are such major concerns that the impetus would be there to do this!

            Modern warfare and it’s very long, and realistically ever more tenuous supply lines that it would already be done.

            Unfortunately, I doubt we’ll see it now. I say that because soon western militaries looking for a very light 7.62 NATO machine gun will have the new version of the Knight LMG (AKA stoner 96) which is or will be available from Knight arms shortly.

            It’s really too bad though because a 7.62 NATO PKM that was as light as the original would potentially really help some of our new Eastern European allies, and help western European militaries maintain adequate stocks of a very good machine gun.

            The eastern European nations could use indigenous industries to do conversions of their own pkm stocks, while simultaneously producing new ones that would feed much needed cash to them while helping western European militaries to survive and maintain stocks of decent equipment.

            Even if it would require a new link design to be made either substitute standard within NATO or outright NATO standard, if enough countries got behind it the Pentagon would be forced to play ball.

          • iksnilol

            You seem to misunderstand, it isn’t something mechanical that makes new production PKMs weigh more than the old Russian PKMs. It is simply that most of them put a heavy barrel on it.

            Like I said. Russians did make a lighter PKM when they tried replacing the 7.62x54mmR. They did this when they created a cartridge called 6×49 Unified Machine Gun. The dissolution of the Soviet Union stopped that project.

          • roguetechie

            I figured it was something like that for the weight inflation.

            I was commenting purely on the feed system issue though, and how there’s possibly savings to be had during a total switchover.

        • Tritro29

          The chinese tried it with theType88. They ended up with a 10kg pig.

  • Amplified Heat

    I knew, I knew it; this series of articles has no conclusion and will simply keep adding cartridges ad infinitum. The whole purpose of the thing was supposed to be comparing comparable (redundant) cartridges with perhaps some insight into why/when each is best suited, yet the scope will expand to include 30 Carbine and 30-06 at this rate.

    What, is TFB gonna catalog the entire regime of small arms cartridge parameters? The reloading manual companies already did that.

    • Yeah, the scope has expanded because my readers asked me to expand it.

      If you’re wondering what’s delaying the wrap-up post I promised, it’s me learning how to make interactive graphs so that the data sets aren’t just all blobbed together and completely unreadable.

  • Jackson Andrew Lewis

    i think we may see a redesign of the 7.62×54 in the nrar future it wont be a huge buth i thing it may se the elimination of the rim from the cartridge as really its still performing doing what it needs to do……. and with millions of rounds still stocked from the soviet era changing the calibre is really just a waste of time and money….

    • Sermon 7.62

      That’s possible.

  • The_Champ

    In a general sense, all of the turn of the century smokeless powder military rounds are nearly indistinguishable from one another, especial by poor fellows getting shot with the fmj bullets they delivered.

  • Schnee

    Guess it’s time for 7.5×55 Swiss. Great articles.

    • I am still undecided on how many of the similar .30 cal historical rounds I am going to do. A lot of them are ballistically identical.

      The next article on a full power article will be pretty special, though, so stay tuned.

      • Alexandru Ianu

        You could do the first one ever – 8mm Lebel.

  • Kivaari

    One thing I noticed about the 54 is if you were to remove the rim it is nearly identical to the 7.5 French or Swiss rounds. It seems that Mauser with his 7.65×53,, Belgian round found essentially the “ideal” .30 caliber round of the era. We look at so many rounds in that caliber and except for a rim and a few thousandths of an inch here and there the performance was so close as to be insignificant.
    I do recall a fellow sailor once telling me how the Russians had designed the 7.62x54mmR so it could use our 7.62x51mm ammuntion. It didn’t seem to dawn on him that the 1890 adoption of the Russian round was half a century before we adopted the NATO round. this was pretty classic military weapons information I saw in both the Navy and Army NG.

    • iksnilol

      Imma be honest, somebody needs to take a Mosin, stuff a 308 in the chamber and pull the trigger… With a really long string, I am talking world record string length.

      Cause I know that 30-06 mausers can fire 308 (due to the claw extractor holding the round in place)… also, don’t do that, it might be dangerous.

      • Bob

        Didn’t IraqVeteran8888 do that at one point in their torture test video? (At work and not going to burn up my data checking. Anyway, if they did it worked. Mosin Nagant will survive!)

        • Kalash

          I think they did it with a 30-30.

      • Kivaari

        I’ve wanted to do that. I sold my collection of m91s.

      • Kivaari

        I’m pretty sure you could use the 7.5 French.

  • Def Tom

    in terms of accuracy the 7,62x54R is a blast in a well built (surplus)rifle like the finnish mosin nagants – i get 10 shot groups of 2″ at 100m using neck sized Lapua brass with a reduced powder charge (Vihtavuori N-110) sporting the great Lapua G477 .308″ 100gr Cutting Edge bullet over iron sights with my finnish m/28-30

  • Art Nickel

    I notice that the .30-06 (7.62x63mm in Europe) was not included on any of the graphs. I can only assume that there was a prejudice against that round that has proven to be the most versatile cartridge in history. It was a turn-of-the-century creation also, but it wasn’t developed overseas so maybe that is why it is excluded here.
    A lot of people like the 7.62×51 and 7.62×54 varieties because they are a little easier on the shoulder, having less space for powder and less heavy bullets at the top of the loading charts, but that doesn’t excuse its being ignored in the charts.