Gungenics Cleaning System

Gungenics

Gun cleaning kits seem to be offered in a wide variety of packages, but few offer actual differences that distinguish between them. Occasionally, someone comes up with a new tool that offers an advantage – or at least a different way – to get your guns clean. The bore snake type tools are a good example of this.

A company by the name of Gungenics is offering pistol cleaning kits and tools that seem to be a positive evolutionary step to the traditional kits.

These tools offer several improvements that suggest they were designed by someone who actually uses the tools to clean his or her firearms. Too many tools I have tried look good in theory but offer little in practical use.

One of the significant changes to the Gungenics kits is the design of the cleaning rod. First, the rod is not metal, but a strong polymer material that will not scratch the finish on your pistol or damage the crown of the barrel. Also, the T-handle has a longer body to help prevent your knuckles from smashing up against the barrel when scrubbing the bore.

The company also uses a quick change system that allows you to snap attachments in and out with relative ease. There are additional features to these kits which are explained in the below video.

What kind of cleaning kit do you use?



Richard Johnson

An advocate of gun proliferation zones, Richard is a long time shooter, former cop and internet entrepreneur. Among the many places he calls home is http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/.


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  • BattleshipGrey

    So it looks like their product is well thought out and practical, but the fake looking gun on the packaging is too distracting.

    • Longhaired Redneck

      Has anyone considered that fiberglass reinforced ‘polymer’ has glass in it? Glass being much harder than steel would, I think, cause far more damage than any steel, brass, or aluminum cleaning rod.

  • Twizzler

    Nice job brushing from the muzzle to the breech. And the packaging looks like it’s meant for air soft with the plastic pistol picture.

    • ShootingFromTheHip

      Never understood the dogma of from the breech to the muzzle ONLY. Brass bristles and cotton patches going from muzzle to breach are not going to damage the barrel in the slightest. Do you understand the amount of pressure and heat a bullet exterts on the barrel wall every time you shoot a gun? Insisting on cleaning only from breech to muzzle accomplishes nothing but perhaps thrice the length of time it takes to clean a weapon.

      • raz-0

        It’s a rule you get because you just may encounter a wide variety of cleaning devices out there. I’ve run into steel bore brushes, and steel cleaning rods with no thread protector.

        You have stuff like that and you want to keep a member of team push it harder from buggering up the crown, you make a rule that it is bore to muzzle only.

  • CS

    I don’t clean my gun. When it’s dirty, I toss it in the trash and buy a new Hi-Point.

    • Harry’s Holsters

      Got to start buying Pheonix that 22 cheaper dem those fortay bullets.

    • Bill

      I like mine to have a protective dirt crust and a coating of rust to reduce glare.

  • Arie Heath

    I’m sure the product works great, however, the airsoft pistol is an odd touch.

  • Harry’s Holsters

    I don’t clean my guns enough to justify buying these and when I do clean them I usually don’t clean the inside of the barrel. I’ve never understood what people call cleaning their barrel cleaning the gun. It’s the other parts that ensure reliability.

    • Kyle

      Regular cleaning of the bore is a likely a hold over the days when corrosive powders and primers were the norm. Then the practice continued due to some barrels being low quality and rusting in humid environments. Not cleaning the barrel would cause significant issues later. That being said is takes about a minute to clean the bore now. So why not just do it anyway? I field strip and clean all my guns after they have been shot.

      • Harry’s Holsters

        I clean mine maybe every 1000 to 1500 rounds. 22s are a different beast that I clean probably every 200 and clean the bore. The reason I really don’t clean the bore is that I have hypocritical OCD where if I’m going to clean the bore I want it spotless and a clean patch. I’ve never achieved that without spending a couple minutes and going through a ton of patches. All the guns I shoot regularly are modern guns with good barrels. I treat inherited guns completely differently and that one reason I don’t shoot them a lot. It still get me me I see someone take their new 30-06 kill a deer and then clean the bore and not touch the bolt or rest of the action. Lots of spotless bores with dirty actions out there.

  • Bill

    If only I didn’t already have 40,000 brushes, jags and mops that already have an essentially universal thread and can be replaced at any MallWart and plenty of backwoods gas stations…

  • SlowJoeCrow

    The Otis cable kits work really well for me. The only thing they lack is a chamber brush for my 10/22.

  • “Hey! Hey Barry, get your wife over here for our promo video!”