James R. who takes the photos for Larry Vickers books sent me this photo of the Armalite AR15 serial number 00001. Many people thought this AR had been destroyed years ago but guess what it turned up. This is the first hi definition photo of this AR as far as I know.

This photo will be the cover for a new book Larry has coming out on the AR in general. I understand it will cover common AR’s as well as rare versions. Limited information is available now but if it’s anything like the 1911 book it should have some good info and gorgeous photos from James.

http://www.vickersguide.com/



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  • borekfk

    Sexy.

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    The centerfold is a glossy hi-res cleaning rod.

  • Harry’s Holsters

    I can only imagine what a gun like this would bring at auction! Awesome pic! It’s moving to see such a piece of history.

  • ChierDuChien

    Too bad Hillary will have that vicious assault weapon destroyed. Probably in a big ceremony with lots of celebrities and lip flapping.

    • Gary Kirk

      That’s going on as we speak..

    • AirborneSoldier

      Flags they have to borrow from local people…

  • Christian Ray Herring

    Are those bakelite grip and stock

  • David Rogers

    Interesting fire control group it has, to have safe in the top position….

    • Isn’t that something:-)

      • Anonymoose

        I’m glad they went the way they did. It makes so much more sense to go from safe-semi-full.

        • It really does make more sense. I’d like to know why they started with this setup.

          • Anonymoose

            Who knows? Some guns go safe-full-semi or safe-semi-full-burst (safe-semi-burst-full, like an MP5A4, makes more sense).

          • Gary Kirk

            The 4 po selector on the socom m4s…

          • Anonymoose

            Too bad they don’t really have 4-position selectors on any US military-issued rifle. Colt made some S-1-F-2 Commandos in the ’60s or ’70s and some S-1-3-F Commandos and M4s for potential export contracts in the ’90s or early 2000s though. I think some S-1-3-F lowers might exist on the transferrable market in extremely small numbers, or possibly as dealer samples. You need a special selector switch that goes over the bumps for those lowers, though, but I have seen those selector switches for sale.

          • Gary Kirk

            Never said they were issue weapons, was just saying that they exist.. Have “witnessed” a couple in my time.. Never got to play with one though. 🙁

          • claymore

            Not true when in Boot Camp at Parris Island in 1969 my platoon were issued, for some evaluation, M-16s with a 4 position selector. They all had a reddish plate stuck to the receiver with the four positions marked on them had safe, semi, auto, and burst. Turned them back in after graduation and never saw any in the field.

          • Juanito Ibañez

            Those with the red “Selector Position Indicator Plate” are Depot or Armorer conversions from the ‘normal’ S-1-F function. The Selector Lever was raised so that it could rotate past the Selector Stops milled into the side of the receiver.

          • claymore

            Ah no these were not local issued modified versions they came from Colt for evaluation by Marines and the selector was normal

          • HSR47

            A transferable Colt M4 Enhanced (IIRC S, 1, 3, F) was recently sold by Targetmaster in Chadd’s Ford PA. IIRC, the asking price was ~$50,000.

          • Alexandru Ianu

            It may have been to quickly select one or the other. All kinds of configurations have advantages and disadvantages.

            Technically some guns go safe-full-semi-burst, so that burst is the default in an emergency (like the Romanian AKs in 5.45 and 5.56).

          • Gary Kirk

            Went with the selector switch in that orientation so with the rifle on safe, a slight push of the thumb in a firing grip put the rifle in semi.. Took a conscious effort to move the selector switch back through safe and therefore into auto.. Early auto block…

          • Malthrak

            My guess would be so that the default position is “safe”. My first experience with the AR15 was relatively late in my firearms career (in my mid 20’s), and finding the “default” position of the selector when uncocked to be “fire” always felt kinda weird, you can’t even put it to “safe” without cocking the weapon, and that still feels weird to me. At least coming from rifles AK’s and G3’s.

          • myndbender

            I had same problem when I got onto the AR wagon & never looked back. I my interest in firearms started back when everyone was putting out piston ARs to “fix” di issues. Not until I started actually shooting & tinkering w/my brother’s di AR did I realize that I’d got caught up in the bogus hype surrounding AR reliability that was common at the time of OIF & the AWB sunset.

          • iksnilol

            Probably faster. Since it is faster to go from safe to full, or from safe to semi than it is to go from safe, to semi, then to full.

            Remember that back in the days full auto was a wee bit more used than today. I remember the Vietnam era M16 comic recommending soldiers to practice flicking the selector from safe to full in one move quickly because “you’re going to need that extra firepower in an ambush” (paraphrased).

        • Gary Kirk

          Safe-Not Safe-F¿¢k you

          • Anonymoose

            We can do better.

        • CommonSense23

          Screws lefties though.

        • HSR47

          The selector positions probably has to do with both ergonomics and with maintaining maximum strength in the part.

          On the first point, the configuration above keeps the selector lever horizontal, and out of the shooter’s way when it’s on either firing position, and down (where the shooter can feel it) when it’s on a safe position. Additionally, it makes it easier/faster to move from “safe” to “semi” and by then forcing a move from “semi” to “safe” before getting to “auto”, it discourages full-auto fire.

          On the second point, there’s a reason that the DPMS 4-position selectors (see the red-plate based 4-position selector markings below in this subthread) in the order “Safe” “Auto” “Semi” “Burst” — The two positions that activate the autosear require more milling, which DPMS felt would structurally compromise the part if they were 90 degrees from each other (as in S-1-3-A). Perhaps the engineers designing had the same concerns about putting semi and auto settings 90 degrees from each other.

      • David Rogers

        It truly is…. Though I’m only 22… It makes me feel bad to know I will likely never be able to hold one of these great weapons before Killery bans them all….

  • The_Champ

    Exactly which safe is that rifle sitting in?

    • Like I said not much info yet.

      • If I’m not mistaken, Reed Knight has had it for 20 years or more. I seem to remember that it was mentioned in Dan Shea’s multiple part series “The Stoner Chronicles” for the now defunct Machine Gun News, or his updated coverage during the early years of Small Arms Review.

        • Anonymoose

          He would have it. Reed Knight has got at least one of every darn thing, ever.

      • Joseph Goins

        S/N 000001 has been on display for years:

        http://www . recoilweb . com/preview-institute-military-technology-12719.html

        https://www . americanrifleman . org/articles/2009/10/14/the-history-of-the-m-16-rifle-stoners-armalite/

    • Anonymoose

      Remington has #193 from the first Colt production run.

    • Giolli Joker

      There’s only one Safe and it’s clearly between Auto and Semi.

      • myndbender

        Yeah, what’s up with the odd placement of the safety settings. Glad they ironed that out back in the day.

    • Joseph Goins

      It isn’t in a safe. It’s on display at Institute of Military Technology (owned by the Knight family) in Florida. See:

      http://www . recoilweb . com/preview-institute-military-technology-12719.html

      https://www . americanrifleman . org/articles/2009/10/14/the-history-of-the-m-16-rifle-stoners-armalite/

  • Malthrak

    Hollywood California…won’t see that engraved as the place of manufacture on a firearm again.

    • No kidding!

      • Gary Kirk

        Now Cali only manufactures suppressors

        • JW

          And douches

          • hkguns

            Probably the highest per capita douche rate in the country.

            Good call.

            Not a fan of LAV either. “Mr. Business”

        • Roadrunner0

          Constitutional rights suppressor’s you say??

          • Gary Kirk

            There are a few manufacturers located in the state..

  • Richard

    Why was it thought to have been destroyed?

    • Anonymoose

      Probably because they modified the design and sold the rights to Colt and had no use for the original trigger-charger prototype anymore?

    • Joseph Goins

      Been on display for over ten years.

      http://www . recoilweb . com/preview-institute-military-technology-12719.html

      https://www . americanrifleman . org/articles/2009/10/14/the-history-of-the-m-16-rifle-stoners-armalite/

  • Don Ward

    Why are they trying to shoot a Pegasus on the logo? And why isn’t the shooter leading it a bit more…

    • Inn a search there isn’t really any info on the origin of that logo.

    • Tinkerer

      The pegasus was the logo of Fairchild Aircraft, Armalite’s parent company.

      • Giolli Joker

        And they gave us the mighty A-10… they should have chosen a winged warthog…

        • Juanito Ibañez

          Remember: “Warthog” was what the A-10 was called — “Thuunderbolt II” was what it was named.

          It was the only aircraft built around the gun (the 30 mm GAU-8 Avenger rotary cannon), rather than figuring out how to arm the aircraft after the design was initiated.

          • David Jamison

            P39 Airacobra.

          • Juanito Ibañez

            Well, pretty much true.

            However, where the Bell Airacobra was designed with the LOCATION of the gun in mind, the T-bolt-2 was designed with the particular GUN in the design.

            So it’s a toss-up. 🙂

          • AirborneSoldier

            Only real cas airplane in usaf inventory. The usaf brass have tried to kill it off for years. The Army keeps saving it. Awesome capabilities, loiter time, etc. The grunts best friend imho.

      • Twilight sparkle

        I guess they wanted to show that they were leaving that behind them.

  • Joseph Goins

    I wonder if he is going to do some more product placement for FIREClean.

  • Anonymoose

    I need this.

  • Rob

    The white lettering looks like it was added in Photoshop.

    • Wzrd

      I thought the same thing.

  • Jwedel1231

    The 1911 book was cool, but held little interest for me. This book will surely be added to my library.

  • claymore

    Still not the same ones, don’t forget this was in 1969 and the plate was NOT like that it was square and did NOT have the shape to go around the selector stops because IT DIDN’T HAVE ANY.

  • claymore

    That would have been interesting as I had one in semi and it was good fun.

    • Juanito Ibañez

      A lot of effort involved, but the resultant cyclic rate wasn’t really any faster than a fast finger on the unconverted, semi-only, trigger. 🙂

  • JW

    It looks like the grip is Bakelite! If that is so it has that in common with the handlebar grips on my great great grandfathers high wheel bike from 1892.