Strike Industries Strike Switch Now Shipping

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Strike Industries is now shipping the ambidextrous safety that we reported was coming soon at SHOT 2016. The Strike Switch is designed to allow the shooter to disengage and engage the safety with a solid firing grip thanks to the toggle style switch. Strike describes the action as intuitive, fast and ergonomic as you can see in the gif below.

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The Strike Switch will be user configurable for either a 60 or 90 degree throw depending on your preference. They also allow you to choose ambidextrous selector levers or a right or left side only option by using the end cap that is included in the kit. Our friends over at Strike Industries have a history of releasing rather well thought out products, but the flexibility of this system is a step beyond their usual level of attention. As is with most Strike products the safety is made of high quality aluminum and anodized in one of four colors; black, grey, red or blue.

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The Strike Switch is also designed to work well with many PDW style stocks on the market as a result of how low profile the levers are when the safety is engaged. As and added bonus, when the selector is in the fire position the PDW stock rails will engage the safety when the stock is collapsed.

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The Strike Switch has a MSRP of $65.95 for the black version and $69.95 for grey, red and blue. If you would like to see more photos of the new selector you can check out Strike Industries’ web page here.



Patrick R

Patrick is a Senior Writer for The Firearm Blog and works in the shooting sports industry. He is an avid recreational shooter and a verified gun nerd. With a lifelong passion for shooting, he has a love for all types of firearms, especially handguns and the AR-15 platform. Patrick may be contacted at tfbpatrick@gmail.com.

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • mouse

    Pretty expensive, will it work with select fire?

    • randomswede

      That’s down to what they call the “shaft” and this one goes in two ways for 60 or 90 degree throw and semi only. I see no reason a “Shaft” couldn’t be made with the notches required, though it may require the fire->full auto angle to be 90 degrees. (0-60-150)

    • DaveP.

      If so, not a big profit loser for them. There’s a LOT more semi only AR platforms floating around than there are full autos.

    • Jonathon Na

      Sure, that would make sense, if they got a government purchase request. For the VAST majority of us with semi only rifles, that part would be an unnecessary expense. How many companies produce select fire safeties? And how much do those cost in comparison with semi-only parts?

  • Gun Owner

    Wait, it ENGAGES the safety when a PDW stock is closed? WTF

    • Blake

      Uh… yeah. How does it not make sense that that the safety would be turned to safe when packed for storage?

      • Cymond

        Uh … How does it not make sense that a PDW might be needed rapidly?

  • C. Her

    I was excited until I saw the price. I hate shifting my grip to flip the switch because I have smaller hands. Does anyone recall the company that made a push button style selector for AR’s?

    • Jared Vynn

      Elftmann tactical

    • uncle bobedy

      Elftmann Tactical? Push Button Ambi Speed Safety for 38$ @ Rainier

    • Rick O’Shay

      Strike has cheaper ambis that have a similar configuration, as long as you don’t mind “polymer” switches.

    • Jonathon Na

      $70 doesn’t seem outrageous given the price of other inclusive safety packages that give you more than one lever option out of the box.

  • BillC

    “As and added bonus, when the selector is in the fire position the PDW
    stock rails will engage the safety when the stock is collapsed.”

    That’s not an added bonus.

  • Steve

    I usually like Strike Industries’ products (love some of them, in fact)… but I just can’t get excited about this one. I’ve been using either the standard Colt-style left-side safety or the BAD-CASS for years and don’t really have any complaints. The only reason I was willing to use the CASS was the dovetailed design and the shorter lever on the main hand side. My father is a lefty and absolutely LOVED it when I installed one for him with the short lever on the left-hand side.

    I do try to keep weapon controls fairly close to the original design. Call it what you want, but should I ever pick up someone’s AR and need to use it, I’d hate to be fumbling due to me getting too familiar with redesigned aftermarket controls.

  • micmac80

    Seriusly 65.95 for about 10$ worth of parts in fancy 5$ box

    • hking

      As someone in machining and factory production, I wish something like that would only be $10. They don’t just say “hey I bet these jackoffs will pay $70 for this” and thats what they charge, no they have to do market analysis, production/cost analysis, and factor in many things to determine a price. You have very expensive milling machines, paint/anodizing machines and equipment, maintenance and parts on those machines, coolant, workers to operate the machines, workers to maintain the machines, raw material costs, R&D costs, tooling costs, a facility to put all this into, electrical/cooling/heat for that facility, and so on and on and on. Something never costs just what the raw materials cost.

    • Cymond

      Well the good news for you is it probably isn’t patented, so you should be able to make some for half the price and turn a huge profit as they fly off the shelves, right?
      Or if not you, then surely someone will do it since it’s so cheap to machine.

  • Bobb

    Their logo is unfortunately reminiscent of a group most people generally don’t like being associated with.

    But this looks cool. But I agree with BillC, what if I want to use my PDW with the stock collapsed. That’s not a bonus.

    • Joseph Goins

      Their logo is unfortunately reminiscent of a group most people generally don’t like being associated with.
      I have never noticed that before, but now that you pointed it out, I can’t stop thinking about it.

    • DaveP.

      “Their logo is unfortunately reminiscent of a group most people generally don’t like being associated with”
      Yeah, there’s a lot of folks out there who’d never admit they were members of the KiSS Army in the early ’80s…

  • JumpIf NotZero

    Noveske 60degree FTW. Cheap, ultra effective, basically magpul parts. Have it on all my ARs.

    • Giolli Joker

      I had to google it.
      Looks robust and effective.
      It’s a a pointless philosophical doubt, but I guess they’re not entirely honest in their description:
      “Machined stainless construction with nitride finish”
      I’d bet it’s mostly a MIM part with some machining finishing.
      As you have the real item, is my guess correct or does it feel as a fully machined piece?
      Thanks.

      (just engineering curiosity)

      • JumpIf NotZero

        It’s a real machined piece. CNC Live Tooling Lathe if I had to guess.

        The selectors themselves are Magpul SCAR selectors.

        • Giolli Joker

          So the selectors are actually polymer?!?
          That is clear then.
          The rod, yep, it is clearly machined metal, but I was thinking “no way they carved those little levers out of stainless steel for 30+$”.
          That’s why I thought of MIM.
          Thanks.

    • Jwedel1231

      Strike makes a 60/90degree (user changable) ambi safety as well, and for $35. Your Noveske 60deg one-sided safety is $40.

      • JumpIf NotZero

        My Noveske is both sided actually, thanks for the comment.

  • Bob

    No expert on ARs, nor have I personally handled this new switch, but it seems like it would be easier to accidently hit with something and render it ready to fire, as opposed to the more flush original design. Kind of race gun sort of thing.

  • L. Roger Rich

    I’d buy that for $1.