Independence Day July 4th 2016

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Today marks the 240th year of our countries Independence and the beginning of the United States of America. Of course today is also a day of celebration when families and friends get together and cook out, shoot fireworks and maybe get some target practice in. I’ve noticed in the last few years it’s all about the long weekend, food, time off from work and not so much about the real reason for our celebration.

We seem to forget that all those years ago our founding fathers risked everything to create this republic. They certainly did pay. Of the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence none had any idea just how successful their endeavor would become.

“We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor” is Jefferson’s final sentence; for over 20 of the signers, that pledge would take on a woeful meaning in the years after 1776. 9 of the signers paid the ultimate sacrifice forfeiting their lives on the altar of freedom while 17 lost all of their property, funds and homes in the ensuing war. Several also lost wives, fathers, husbands and brothers. Not one person that signed that historic document ever backed down to save their lives or property. Their courage was mightily tested but none ever betrayed their oath to the Republic or their oath to the Declaration of Independence.

Many of the founding fathers spent their fortunes to equip our army, purchase food and other essentials of war. Of these brave men Robert Morris lost the most and spent all of his considerable fortune to keep Congress from bankruptcy as well as paying blockade runners to bring provisions back from Europe. Morris died impoverished in 1806. The new government never paid him back for his total dedication to Freedom!

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So as we celebrate the birthday of the United States of America today lets not forget those known founding fathers as well as those extraordinary citizen soldiers long forgotten who paid the price for our freedom today. We have faced many challenges over the past 240 years and no doubt will face more trials in the future. As we celebrate this day lets not forget those who gave so much for our liberty. Let us always be grateful and may God bless America.

From all of the staff here at TFB we wish you a wonderful holiday and thank you very much for your continued support of TFB!

Some gear for the 4th full auto fun

Some gear for the 4th full auto fun



Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the Associate Editor and moderator at TFB. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!


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  • KestrelBike

    Happy 4th, fellow Freedom lovers!!

  • onehalfheffer

    Today is also the Philippines’ Republic Day, where we celebrate the formality of Philippine Independence from both Japanese and American occupation.

    Not exactly a day worth turning into a special non-working holiday, really.

    As for you AMericans, Happy Independence Day. Enjoy it, don’t booze too hard because Tuesday is Monday this week, careful with fireworks or else you’ll lose fingers, and shoot responsibly.

    Also, question: what gun is what Founding Father?

  • Joseph Goins

    Respectfully, where did you hear that “9 of the signers paid the ultimate sacrifice forfeiting their lives on the altar of freedom”? Only five signers were ever held prisoner, and none of them died at the hands of the British.

    –Edward Rutledge, Arthur Middleton, and Thomas Heyward (all South Carolina) were taken as prisoners of war when Charleston fell in May 1780. They were exchanged in July 1781.

    — George Walton (Georgia) was wounded in action and taken as a prisoner of war in December 1778. He was exchanged in October 1779.

    –Richard Stockton (New Jersey) was taken prisoner by local Tory militia on November 30, 1776. He was offered a pardon if he ceased taking a part in the rebellion. He initially refused and was sent to a prison ship. He later accepted paroled due to his diminished health on January 13, 1777 under the condition that he not participate further in the revolution. (This destroys the narrative you created that “not one person that signed that historic document ever backed down to save their lives or property.”)

    I cannot verify that “17 lost all of their property, funds and homes in the ensuing war. Several also lost wives, fathers, husbands and brothers.” However, I will speculate that no one lost wives as women did not serve in the military and it was un-gentlemanly to attack women.

    Also, Robert Morris wasn’t reimbursed for his estimated personal contribution of an estimated $74 million (about $1.03 billion today) but he may have profited from illegal trade (a disputed charge as a board of inquiry exonerated him). Nonetheless, he became poor after terrible land speculation and the Panic of 1797. He ended up in a debtor’s prison, but he was freed when Congress passed the Bankruptcy Act of 1800 largely to get him out. His financial situation at the end of his life had little to do with the large sums he willingly gave to the cause of freedom.

    • I wasn’t out to write a book and since he was exonerated that was left out. The 9 figure was from a history book and what I read on R Stockton was from the same source history book.

      • Joseph Goins

        Fair enough, but you may want to get a different history book. As a professional historian, I just don’t like repeating things as it creates myths. I’m not at all suggesting you did that on purpose, but merely that your source is inconsistent with the historical record.

        Now, if you will excuse me, I’ll get back to shooting my CheyTac M300 with my new PVS-22 out to 1000 yards. Why? Because America.

        • Argh I’m jealous. That is one heck of a rifle. Enjoy the holiday doing some long distance shooting! It’s a good night to shoot here.

          • Joseph Goins

            I’ve had the gun for a while. The scope is an early birthday present to myself. I’ve been blessed financially, and I know that most people can’t afford an $18K gun, scope, and night vision. If you are ever in Virginia, look me up and we’ll go shooting.

          • Good for you Joseph I wish everyone could be that successful!

          • DanGoodShot

            Hey Joseph, If Phil doesn’t take you up on that offer, I’d be more than happy to take his place! Thats a nice setup. Happy 4th brother.

  • vwVwwVwv

    Happy 4th from sinking Europe, it gave the whol humanity a lot…

  • paulm53

    Happy 240 America. You will live long because through the power of the vote you are able to change according to the will of We The People whom you serve.

  • Major Tom

    You post a pic of some guns for the American 4th of July holiday, and yet one of them is a German weapon (the G36C). Traitor!

    /justhavingfun

  • DanGoodShot

    Excellent piece TFB! My god grant this nation the people who are willing to lay down their lives in the name of freedom, liberty and the pursuit of a better America. Happy 4 of July to all my brothers and sisters in arms.

  • Pete – TFB Writer

    Well said Phil. Happy 4th everyone!

  • claymore

    We are here able to be posting on this site because of our founding fathers intelligence to include freedom of the press and more importantly the second amendment. Without it there probably wouldn’t be the freedom to post here.

  • Sasquatch

    Happy 4th everybody!!! Never forget what this day is and why we celebrate it!

  • Blake

    Kudos for mentioning Robert Morris for his critical but largely unknown role as financier of the American Revolution & the foundation of our country.

  • Oldtrader3

    Happy 4th, gun lovers!