SOCOM Chooses .300 Norma Magnum for ASR

300nm_berger_230

According to Long Range Shooting Handbook, SOCOM has officially chosen the .300 Norma Mag for their Advanced Sniper Rifle (ASR) Cartridge.

Here is photo comparing other popular cartridges to the .300 Norma Mag.

300-Win-Mag-vs-300-Norma-Mag-vs-338-Lapua-Mag

 

Here is what Long Range Hand Book had to say on the new cartridge decision.

The 300 Norma Mag is based off of the 338 Norma Mag case necked down to accept a .30 caliber bullet.  It launches a 220gr .308 bullet at just over 3,000 fps. That’s 4,400 ft/lbs of energy!  This cartridge is not to be confused with the 308 Norma Mag. The 300 Norma Mag really shines when it is shooting either the 230gr Berger Hybrid bullet – this bullet has an out-of-this world 0.743 Ballistic Coefficient (BC)!  (If you’re looking to learn about BC, check out Chapter 10 of the Long Range Shooting Handbook)  When loaded up to 3,000 fps, this bullet from the 300 Norma Mag will stay supersonic out to 1,500 meters!  This is as far as a much heavier 300gr SMK shot out of a 338 Lapua can make it before it goes subsonic!  Even though the 300 Norma will only have 80% of the energy of the 338 Lapua at that distance with those bullets, it can still make it there accurately with considerably less recoil.  Another benefit to the 300 Norma Mag is the overall length is shorter than the 338 Lapua Mag – it is effectively the same length as the 300 Win Mag.

Despite its benefits, it is still an interesting choice.  For example, it is based off of the same parent cartridge as the 338 Lapua mag….the 416 Rigby.  This means that a bolt with a large face is needed which often means a large action.  It is nice that it isn’t a rimmed magnum like the 300 Win Mag (I’m biased against rimmed cases), but I’m not yet convinced that the performance necessitates a larger bolt face and action.   For example, when loaded with the same bullet, the 300 Win Mag, 300 RUM, or 30 Nosler don’t fall that far behind the 300 Norma Mag.  In fact, there’s less of an energy difference at 1,000 meters between the 300 Norma and the 300 Win Mag (the weakest of the 3 alternatives) than there is between the 300 Norma Mag and the 338 Lapua Mag.  And, each of the alternatives listed use a smaller bolt face and a standard “magnum” action.

I’ll be interested to see why this particular cartridge was selected.  If I could, I would’ve bet on the 30 Nosler but I would’ve lost.

 



Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • Steve

    “Long Range Shooting Handbook” thinks a .300 Win Mag is rimmed, eh? Seems to me they should know the difference between rimmed and belted.

    • Steve

      Furthermore… is there any source for this beyond this book?

      • Richard Chelvan

        1) Precision Shooting at 1,000 Yards Edited by Dave Brennan; 2) The Highpower Shooting Primer: The Very Best Articles on Shooting and Reloading for the Most Popular of all the Rifle Accuracy Disciplines…Highpower Shooting. From the Pages of Precision Shooting Magazine 1990 – 1999; 3) Precision Shooting, Reloading Guide: For Those Individuals Concerned With “Extreme Rifle Accuracy, in the Various Disciplines; 4) Military and Police Sniping by Mike Lau.

        And the magazine Precision Rifle Shooting edited by Dave Brennan, and Tactical Shooting also by Dave Brennan.

        These gentlemen have forgotten more about the subject than we will ever know and they do know the difference between a rimmed and a belted case!
        That should get you started!

  • Aono

    Not sure why they would compare a .338 300 SMK to a .308 230 Berger Hybrid and not another SMK. Their data also doesn’t add up because it’s not clear where they’re pulling their ballistic coefficients from or why they’re even using G1. I hate ballistic comparisons that change too many factors at once.

    It would be interesting to know what projectile SOCOM actually plans on using.

    • Steve

      …or cartridge.

      I’m not finding ANYTHING beyond this guy’s Twitter feed that makes this claim. He clearly has credentials… but it still seems like a strange place for this news to come from.

      • Aono

        In their defense, because the selection is not implausible in and of itself, one reason for doing the Berger vs Sierra comparison is because SOCOM may have explicitly chosen the Berger. After all the 338 Lapua Magnum wasn’t initially designed around a 300gr bullet and so it doesn’t have ideal seating depth within its factory COAL compared to, say, a 6.5 Creedmoor or other modern cartridge. It’s entirely possible that the 300 Norma was chosen explicitly because of the 230 Hybrid, and they would both seem to me to be great choices.

        All other things being equal, you want the least amount of powder and projectile to lug around that can stay supersonic past a threshold range above a given impact energy minimum. If the minimum was about 800 ft/lb at 1500 meters (energy roughly equivalent to a 62gr 5.56 at 200m) while supersonic at Hindu Kush altitudes then this would be a great choice, regardless of how the info is being reported.

        • Steve

          Not questioning the cartridge, but rather the validity of the report. The decision is plausible, but a retired sniper-turned-lawyer’s Twitter feed isn’t the most believable source (for me).

      • Kivaari

        In a new book before it appears elsewhere seems unlikely. Are book sales slow?

    • Kivaari

      Look at all the VLD-ELD bullets and they share the same developing profile. The Lapua-Sierra Matchking styles are great, while even better bullets exist. BUT, they have to build them for use in existing rifles having SAAMI spec. If they put a new RIFLE and cartridge together designed for the overly long VLD bullets they don’t want that ammo getting shoved into grandpas elk rifle. Controlled in the military it would be just fine. As soon as a handloader buys those slugs, follows the data and shoves them into a rifle having a commercial chamber – it goes boom!!!.

  • Lance

    Strange now all services have different calibers for there sniper rifles. Regular Army uses .300 win mag, USMC stays with .308 win and now SOCOM now uses 300 Norma mag. Hope snipers never get far from home base or finding ammo for there sniper rifles bwill be a %#@&%.

    • kzrkp

      standardizing is below pointless. snipers have to shepard their own ammo for accuracy’s sake, they should shoot whatever they choose to.

      • Kivaari

        It’s crazy.

    • LCON

      .308 will stay with snipers using the CSASS in the Army and The Marines will likely use it to,
      However the Marines see to be in a internal debate on if the next M40 will stay with .308 right now it seems likely.
      Yet with the US Army is buying large stocks of M2010 I suspect the Marines may supplement some of the M40X with a few M2010 using Shared Army stocks much like how the Marines picked up M110’s and M240B. this would have the bonus of standardizing from Army .300WM rounds and having a degree of existing training due to the fact that the Marines M40A6 already uses the same stock chassis and similar manual of arms, And Marines may cross train snipers for the M2010 with the Army snipers saving money.

      • Philip Palmer

        Not to mention that most new chassis systems (like Remington MSR, aka MK21) have interchangeable barrel systems. Anything designed to chamber .338LM can also be swapped to anything shorter, including .308Win, .300WM, .338NM and .300NM. Many manufacturers of military sniper rifles are following suit, Sako, Barrett, AI, and Cadex.

  • Blue Centurion

    What could you want that 338 Lapua and 300 Win Mag don’t already have to offer. Crazy.

    • G

      300NM will have a higher muzzle velocity than 300WM when both cartridges are loaded with the same bullet. 300 Norma Magnum, loaded with a 230 gr Berger, Target Hybrid will shoot flatter, have less wind drift and less recoil than a 338 Lapua Magnum loaded with a 250 gr bullet.

      • FarmerB

        So, you load it with a 300gn bullet.

        • G

          A 338 Lapua Magnum with a 300 gr bullet will have much more recoil than a 300 Norma magnum with a 230 gr bullet.

          • FarmerB

            This is mostly a paper argument – I shoot against 300RUM (and 1 or 2 300NM) shooters all the time out to 1600+m. It would be just pointless to change from my TRG-42 338LM to a 300NM for a bit less drop (and less barrel life :-). Drop doesn’t really count for much in a military setting – wind drift is much more important and retained energy. When the wind’s blowing, I know which does better (although on paper not much between them). Unless the wind is really going, I don’t get the 338 out of the bag unless it’s over 1100m.

            And it doesn’t have “much more recoil” – even assuming the same rifle weight (!): granted the energy is more on the 338, but the impulse is about the same (within 5%). But whatever, they’re both better than an M107.

          • G

            I re-barreled my TRG-42 with a 300 Norma Magnum barrel. 300 Norma is just a better long cartridge than 338 Lapua Magnum.

          • Kivaari

            Until someone necks it down to 6.5mm and then it will be “perfect”. After all every “knows” that 6.5mm is “perfect”. Until it is a VLD .308 250 gr. bullet driven at 6,000 FPS.

          • Jwedel1231

            Lol. I’d start taking bets on how long a 6.5mm/.264 Norma Magnum’s barrel would last. Any takers at 900 rounds? I’m putting my money on 800 rounds before that sucker needs replacing.

          • Kivaari

            We learned that in the early 60s. The .264 WM ate bores before the shooter could find his favorite load. Early Remington M700 in 7mm RM had stainless steel tubes. They cost money, so they switched to conventional barrel material. Many think these super rounds are really super. If you are not buying the $1000 barrels every 1000 rounds, I guess it doesn’t matter.

          • FarmerB

            Exactly. The 6.5 “concept” isn’t new.

          • micmac80

            Drop is not important for you guys shootng at known distance targets. For unknown distance targets drop is as or more important as Wind drift. Second factor people overlook is magazine lenght OAL ,338LM mags have unfortunately short OAL so restrict growth of .338LM considerably .338NM and 300NM only realy exist because the mag lenght limits on .338LM

          • FarmerB

            Yeah, no argument from me. I use completely different equipment in unknown range scenarios (such as hunting live animals) depending on drop and terminal ballistic needs.

        • G

          Norma’s 300 NM factory ammunition shoots flatter and than stays super sonic longer than 338 Lapua Magnum with 300 gr bullets.

      • Kivaari

        Couldn’t that be said about the 7mm Rem Mag or .264 Win Mag? Optimizing throat and twist rate for the right ELD bullet and you get what is desired. Except what is desired is just another answer for what already exists. The “Efficiency” claim always truck me as really odd. So, if a new shape gives a 3% reduction in powder to gain a few feet per second, couldn’t a new lead and twist rate regain that in an existing cartridge? Like Weatherby increasing the lead allowed them to up the velocities. Like the M855 compared to the M193. A “new wonder nipper round” doesn’t seem like a wise move. Over the years I’ve seen quite a few new rounds. Go back 60 years and we had the .244 Remington AKA: 6x57mm Mauser. Take Mausers 57mm case and put bullets in them from 5.5 to 11mm and it was done 110 years ago.

        • G

          Benchrest shooters like to jam bullets into the lands because having a short free bore, or even no free bore at all, usually means better accuracy.

          • Kivaari

            Yes, and it works. But if the round and bullet combination they wanted required a longer lead for a longer ogive, then the ammo would fit like a bench shooters set up. If you bought conventional .300 Win Mag ammo at Walmart it would likely shoot a bigger group. But, that isn’t or wouldn’t be a concern. Same round with a longer VLD slug just like the .223 chamber v. 5.56 (M193) v. 5.56 NATO (M855). The NATO chamber works with either round, while a .223 can’t accept the others without trouble.

  • Spencerhut

    What is wrong with plain old 300 Win Mag? I’ve never been a huge fan of it, but it’s difficult to argue with the success it’s had in long distance shooting over the years.

    • Kivaari

      AND, it exists in quantity. A well, known round of proven performance.

      • Devil_Doc

        Chris Kyle preferred the 300wm….

        • Kivaari

          He knew his business.

    • Richard Chelvan

      I got to shoot with various elements like Marine Corps, Secret Service, SOTIC sniper committee, and various civilians back in 1991. I ended up, quite by accident duplicating the SOTIC sniper committee’s load in the .300WM. We also knew then that to get more range, you would use 220 grainers. The 7mm were not as consistent as the .30 calibers, and the 6.5s were being experimented with. Many were shooting 30-338s in Winchester rifles and getting great results.
      Probably the larger case of the 300 Norma in 30 caliber is cheaper and maybe as efficient as the .338 Lapua. The case capacity is a factor and it is not belted which is a plus. We already have the .50 in play so why the .338 Lapua?

    • Nicholas Keith

      It is inferior to the 300NM. The NM will push 215 & 230 Bergers fast enough to satabilize at long range where the 300WM struggles. The additional 200 FPS or so gives it longer range and energy on target at range.

    • Blue Centurion

      That was my point exactly.

  • toms

    Maybe he meant the .338 norma mag? GDynamics is pushing their light weight .338 NM machine gun to special forces and it would make sense to standardize caliber.

    • G

      “There were several cartridges under consideration during the PSR 1 timeframe, including the .300NM. Remember, the PSR was “non-caliber specific” while having a very demanding accuracy requirement. There is a large body of data that demonstrates the accuracy superiority of .30 caliber vs .338 caliber. The desire was to be able to drive a large .30 caliber bullet fast enough to meet kinetic energy requirements at 1500 meters while meeting 1.0 MOA vertical dispersion for 60 shots. The vertical dispersion requirement was later relaxed to 1.5MOA and a terminal velocity requirement was added that virtually eleminated any .30 caliber round from contention.”

      Scott Seigmund, Accuracy International North America

    • Kivaari

      Or even the .308 Norma Mag AKA: .30-338. It is short and that makes it easier to make a rifle for it.

  • xebat

    Why not he 300 Blackout ?

  • Porty1119

    They chose the what now?

  • John

    OK men, we want to find an expensive and obscure cartridge to obfuscate the millions of dollars spent on other pet projects. We need to develop a NEW round that uses pure gold for the projectile, platinum for the case and shredded $100 bills for the propellant….GET TO WORK!

    • vwVwwVwv

      with 1ct. diamond points and the gun must be made out od gold to….

      • Kivaari

        For going through auto-glass first.

      • alex archuleta

        Instead of gold may I suggest a 1911 that’s made of meteorite?

        • vwVwwVwv

          com on, wasnt that a great gun, i loved it.

    • josh

      with unicorn horn for the penetrator core.

      • Richard Chelvan

        Mercury is better, polonium is preferable! 😉

      • Blue Centurion

        I was thinking Dragon Glass.

    • Richard Chelvan

      To obfuscate further, I would use palladium for the cases and tungsten carbine for the projectiles! 😉

      • Blue Centurion

        Nah…just make the projectile with D.U.

        • Richard Chelvan

          Too dangerous to the user as well. A bad way to go.

  • hacedeca

    I always thought, the reason for the developement of the 338 Lapua was the need to defeat body armour at ranges beyond 600 meters… This new bullet can do this obviously not that good… That’s the fun fact bout the military: They always want to win the last war, not the next one – And body armour will then be more common.

    • Kivaari

      For every new defense there comes a means to defeat it, until the next time.

    • Is there an AP .338 load? I’ve seen quite a few armor tests on youtube using regular lead or copper projectiles for the .338 and the plates being tested all stopped the .338 at 100 yards.

      • Dan

        Yes, although I have never seen any tests on them. I think Lapua or whatever the parent company is has them listed.

      • Brad

        I have tested .338 FMJ and AP. Both penetrate plates easily past 200m. The .338 in 250gr is extremely accurate beyond 800m where the best .308’s become largely effected by wind and other environmental conditions….338 with a standard barrel and muzzle break is hard on the shooter. With the proper muzzle break installed we found it much the same as shooting our.308’s and grew to love it. Price of.338 ammo is more expensive than.300….also a factor to consider……

        • Do you recall what type of plates (poly, ceramic, steel) they were?

        • Just Sayin’

          At $5/round we call our .338 the “Little Ceasar” (because each one you send down range just cost you a pizza). I actually hate shooting it, feels like you’ve been in a car wreck when you’re finished.

      • Kivaari

        What kind of plates? Ceramic? I can’t see normal man-worn armor doing that well. We can always make bit of a armor that stops whatever we want to stop. We just can’t carry it.

        • A pretty cheap $200 Level 4 ceramic plate stopped this .338 at only 50 yards. These type of octagon-tile ceramic plates are available from Asian sources (Singapore, China) online for under $100; well within the price range of even a modestly funded military force. These plates are 7lbs x 1″ thick, fairly standard weight in this class.

          The video is “338 Lapua vs RMA Level IV Armor” by the excellent youtuber “The Wound Channel,” who does a lot of great tests. I’d link the video but then my post wouldn’t appear for hours due to auto-moderation. The blunt force at 50 yards was ridiculous and likely fatal; however at 300-600 yards it would be extremely painful but ultimately survivable. Can’t imagine too many 50 yard .338 lapua shots in combat.

          The only armor I’ve found online that has been defeated by standard .338 Ball is ar500 steel III/III+, due to the kinetic energy actually cracking off a big piece of the plate (rather than punching a hole through.) However Steel plates cost as much as ceramic to produce, and I’m not aware of any military force since WW1 equipped with steel armor.

          • Kivaari

            Thanks for the great information. Velocity really does matter. Add the hardened penetrator and a great deal of range is picked up. Since I retired so long ago, I never had access to common soft body armor for E and older GI gear. In Vietnam we had plate-type and soft frag vests just stacked on the deck of the bridge. On the previous cruise the ship took about 1500 rounds of cannon fire shot at it, with only a few fragments scratching paint. On my cruise in ’70 they didn’t even shoot. ECM reported, “We have radar characteristic of 57mm cannon locked on to us “in the fire-mode”. Our 5″ deck guns would turn towards NVN at the DMZ and no one would shoot. It could have been exciting. It never was.

    • Jwedel1231

      I hope that wasn’t why they did that. 50 bmg ball may not penetrate body armor at 600 yards, but it still has around 6,250 ft*lbs of energy. Surely that would be enough energy to seriously incapacitate a human, even without penetration, right?

  • Major Tom

    So how many cartridges will the US military have to stock and field now? Fifty bajillion?

    And they were complaining they had too many types of ammo to manage in the 50s and it was only like 6.

  • Kivaari

    Seriously, Is there a real reason to do this? Are there enough targets for a sniper to engage at 1500m? Especially, after a short learning curve the enemy will go to 1600m. It seems like a small guided missile would be more effective. There really wont be that many snipers that even with the finest equipment will engage enough targets to justify a new rifle and cartridge.
    We would be better off building a disposable drone that can fly down the shirt of an opponent. A drone that doesn’t take a years worth of training to stop a dozen men in a tour.
    I like long range rifles and shooters that have the skill to use them. I think it is a waste of resources for little return. Like all the terrorist screening at NYC subways. The terrorists can’t board a subway, so when they attack, they will hit the Choke Point AKA: Check Point.

    • G

      “There is a large body of data that demonstrates the accuracy superiority of .30 caliber vs .338 caliber.”

      Scott Seigmund – Accuracy International North America

      “My favorite, the 300 Norma Magnum, I believe this is a much better solution than going larger. If you look at the trend with Tactical Competition Shooters to go smaller using rounds like the 6mm Creedmoor, the 300NM follows this. A better bullet, a more efficient case design, and high velocities.”

      Frank Galli – Sniper’s Hide

      • Kivaari

        We can always make a round that will outperform what ever is being used as the base. There comes a time when it becomes too much. A .416 Ch, out performs .50 BMG. A 120mm APFSDS outperforms the 105 HEAT.

    • micmac80

      US military in Iraq and Afghanistan more or less avoids using Snipers in their traditional roles where pairs would go into enemy back yard. Now snipers operate almost in platoon size and overwatch positions from which they are covering the troops that results in snipers often being behind frendly lines not in enemy turf so part of the range is needed just to cover the friendly troops let alone reach out to the enemy. .308 is dead as a sniper round ,.338 is the new standard

    • Nicholas Keith

      Long ago in a far away land called Afganistan, the US military was routinely outgunned by men in Pajamas with PKM’s. The US military’s largest organic weapon was generally the 7.62×51 which has inferior range, especially when being attacked by a PKM from a higher vantage point across the valley. Not everyone has mortars, arty and CAS on standby so having an organic weapon capable of making hits out to 2000M is a big deal when you are pinned down and don’t have the firepower to fight back.

      • Kivaari

        Ballistics of the X54 isn’t that much more than the X51. Unless they are using a longer heavier bullet, in the 175 gr zone. They are on parity with each other. One should not take the low ground. Since it was expected to be attacked from high ground, it would be a command failure to provide adequate responses. Troops should not be used as bait, if there is no trap to spring.
        Hits at 2000 meters are lucky hits made by spraying the troops. Throw enough bullets at extreme range and you can get a hit. A 240 gunner can spray hillsides.

  • Kivaari

    What does the Army have to say? Is it like all the Army Times articles telling us “It is official the HK XM8 is the new rifle being adopted”. How does a commercial book make this claim, when it isn’t in some kind of press release? I doubt this has any validity. It just doesn’t make sense to be jumping all over the place on such limited use items.

  • John May

    Does anyone have a link to info about this “Advanced Sniper Rifle”? I know of the new PSR(Precision Sniper Rifle) but I’ve never heard of this one until today. All my googling gives just a bunch of air soft crap and repeats of the article above.

    • There has been rumbling that SOCOM has been disappointed with Remington’s production model Mk 21 Mod 0 PSR. From what I’ve been able to dig up, it looks like SOCOM zeroed out the pending delivery orders for the rifles and the only subsequent orders on the contract have been for ammunition.

      • Kivaari

        Remington has gone down hill for quite awhile. I wound not be surprised. Remington is not motivated enough to do a good job on civilian guns. They put that same attitude to work elsewhere and sell a couple hundred of them worldwide hoping to make up for all the lost sales taking place in Walmarts and Cabela’s.

  • noob

    Could the General Dynamics Lightweight Medium Machine Gun in 338 Norma Magnum be rechambered down to use the 300 norma magnum? at least then you could have two weapons on the same ammo.

  • Bullphrog855

    Didn’t the .300 Norma get adopted with the with the Marines as well a while back? I believe it was adopted with a MG called the M241.

    • LCON

      Nope. There was a offering from GDLS the Light medium Machine gun in .338 Norma mag but the military never touched it. The Marines have used a few Sako’s in .338LM though. I don’t think there is a weapon currently carrying the designation M241

  • RBR

    The Army has supposedly been converting .308s to . 300 Win Mags with 20 inch barrels (to use with suppressors) because the .308 is only an 800 yard cartridge in the field. The choice of the new cartridge reflects a move away from the .50 BMG in many circumstances, as is the .338 Lapua, because of reduced weight of the weapon and more ammo for weight as a part of the load out. Lesser recoil also translates into quicker target acquisition, but, even for the specops community which has its own acquisition system, one has to wonder about complications in the supply chain. It will be interesting to see how this compares with the .300 Win Mag in the real world.

    • LCON

      That was the original Army plan but, In the end they stopped trying to convert the M24 and M24A1 and adopted a new rifle the M2010 in .300WM

      • John May

        I thought the M2010 still uses the receiver and bolt and barrel of the M24/A1?

        • LCON

          early on when it was called M24E that was the plan but Overall the number of changes made went far beyond the traditional update. Basically only the bolt the Remington 700 long action is retained. they gave it a new barrel.
          M24 has a 24 inch 416R steel barrel with a 1 in 11 5R twist rifling
          M2010 has a 24 inch 1 in 10 R5 hammer forged barrel ,
          New stock The Drake associates Stock system that Remington adopted ,
          new 5 round box magazine,
          AAC muzzle break,
          AAC Titan suppressor
          and a Leupold E/RT scope.

      • RBR

        What I heard was that they discovered a lot of them were simply worn out. Jerry Stiller has a large contract to provide new actions to the army.

  • Big Daddy

    I was reading about the 230gr Berger Hybrid bullet. Great design and really interesting concept.

  • vwVwwVwv

    my question would be if the bulet is over 1 mach after 1 km (+- 100yards) and after 1.5 km.
    when the projectile goes below soundspeed from over mach1 to below mach1,
    it tends to tumble a bit and precision is lost than.

    • Jwedel1231

      Correct, which is why they keep pushing bullets faster, to push that transonic point further and further out, pushing their effective range further out.

  • Tormund Giantsbane

    Belt fed version when?

  • Ghost930

    Believe it when I see one in the field.

  • G

    “If I could, I would’ve bet on the 30 Nosler but I would’ve lost.”

    I would have bet on 300 Norma Magnum if someone told me that SOCOM had chosen a belt-less .30 caliber cartridge. 300NM was designed for 215+ grain bullets.

    • Kivaari

      There is no reason the belt couldn’t be removed from any magnum. They never really head spaced on the belt as advertised.

  • Jwedel1231

    If I were them and paid per rifle what I have to assume Remington is charging, I’d be extremely pissed. Pissed enough to tell Remington to go pound sand and buy a whole new system from someone else to replace Big Green’s junk.

  • Rooster

    As a handloader I know some of these new powders are game changers. An example, with reloader 26 in my 300wm i can out perform a 300 Rum factory load.

    There are no flys on the 300wm and with all the new powders AND bullets now availible why wouldnt the govt try some new loads before throwing the baby out with the bath water.

  • Richard Chelvan

    Belted cases are not a problem if you size them midway up the shoulder – just be consistent.

  • Guy Bivens

    Say what you will about the “experts” the 300 magnum is NOT a rimmed cartridge, it is a belted magnum cartridge. If you have to flout your credentials to an overwhelming population of gunners from multiple generations and backgrounds to “justify” your misstatement, it’s time for you to just admit you were wrong or change your last name to Obama.

  • Richard Lutz

    9x19mm, 5.56x45mm, 7.62x51mm, .338 LM, .50 BMG. That is all that is needed.