Drone Target Plus Drone Ammunition = Awesome!

gnatwarfare2

It’s been almost one year since I wrote up one of these daily posts about Snake River Shooting Product’s Drone Munition ammunition. Now, thanks to what can only be seen as a fortuitous meeting of products or an alignment of firearms-related stars, we have what just might be the perfect combination: Drone Munition and flying drones to go with it. After all, a year ago I found myself needing to add a disclaimer to the post about the ammunition reminding readers not to actually shoot down drones in a law-breaking type of scenario. Now you can – well, you can shoot these particular drones down, thanks to Gnat Warfare.

Gnat Warfare isn’t a brand new company. After all, they got their start in the UK and began production here in the United States a couple years ago. But it seems they’ve only recently begun gaining popularity on a larger scale here in the States, and I’m here to tell you their drones seriously rock (they especially rock when you shoot them, but I digress).

The company manufactures remote-controlled drones capable of speeds up to 80 miles per hour, speeds attained along with being highly maneuverable. The drones can simply soar right over the shooter’s head or they can suddenly change direction. It’s all up to whoever is in charge of the remote control. Even better, the company’s “Gnat” features ten pyrotechnic charges on the underside of the drone.

As for the ammo, Snake River Shooting Products is still manufacturing their Drone Munition. Drone Munition is a 12-gauge, 3″ shot shell filled with either #2 steel shot or BB shot. While it’s true you could take a shot at one of these Gnat Warfare drones with different shot shells, there’s just something satisfying about using drone rounds on a drone.

For MSRP and sales information on the drones, contact Gnat Warfare either through their website at http://www.gnatwarfare.com/index.html or by phone at (480) 267-8102

To get your hands on some Drone Munition, visit Snake River Shooting Products at http://snakerivershootingproducts.com/ammunition/

Visit the following link to view the video below, which was taken this month at Hogfest 2016 of a Gnat Warfare drone being shot down: https://www.facebook.com/AxelsonTactical/videos/1256652274363135/

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katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


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  • SmithTech22

    pyrotechnic charges and shotgun rounds don’t make for a reusable drone
    not worth more than $1.00 if that’s the case
    they should have used lasers.
    this hobby is expensive enough as it is.

    • M.M.D.C.

      It isn’t immediately clear, but I think the idea is that the drones have a shot/blast-proof core with all the expensive bits inside and an expendable wing, thus keeping the destruction affordable.

      Could be fun.

  • iksnilol

    Am I the only one that thinks shotguns are the worst anti-drone weapons? I mean, you’re launching a bunch of projectiles with crappy penetration at something that’s hard.

    • M.M.D.C.

      Maybe, but shotguns are well suited to knocking flying things down and the projectiles become more or less harmless by the time the fall to earth, unlike rifle or pistol bullets.

      Drones have to be very light and, as a result, are fairly soft targets. I could be wrong.

      • iksnilol

        You got several points there, comrade.

        For optimum cheeki breeki vs drones, I’d go for PKM. Glorious machine for gunning of great Mikhail Kalashnikov. Like, mount on truck or something, link up spam can of ammo. Point at sky where drone is, let loose dogs of iv damke. Maybe drink vodka to help with shot dispersion.

        • Evan

          While that sounds incredibly fun, it would almost certainly result in a negative response from local, state, and/or federal law enforcement.

          • iksnilol

            Oh come on, those capitalists had it coming. We all know that.

        • SP mclaughlin

          If we ever have an insurrection here in America, Putin better airdrop us some PKMs and other goodies.

    • Honestly anti-drone use is one of the few times a shotgun makes sense. Hitting a flying, relatively delicate object is what they are made for.

      Given the choice of a shotgun load of .177 BB shot vs a fully automatic .177 BB gun firing at the same velocity (1200fps say) I would bet your overall hit probability would be much, much higher with the shotgun.

      There’s a reason all AA rounds use a proximity fuse 😉

      • iksnilol

        O’m just thinking that shotguns fire a slow projectile and many of the drone components are protected well. I know GPS is weakly protected.

        Though it depends on drone critter you’re hunting. A big UAV or some plastic hobby drone?

        • Obviously plastic toy hobby drone. Though if these don’t have a camera, then they are really just RC planes.

          An actual “drone” drone flies at 30,000 feet, and brings missiles to a gunfight. Be better off just shooting yourself at that point.

      • politicsbyothermeans

        “There’s a reason all AA rounds use a proximity fuse”
        Sorry, m8, not true. I was a Bradley platoon leader in an air defense battery. We used plain old HE and AP, depending on the target. HE for hovering or slow moving helicopters, AP for fast movers. Neither round is proximity fused. Here’s the Air-defense reticle “choking” a helicopter.

        We also used to do aerial gunnery tables using RC/MATs. Basically they were crappy RC airplanes with proximity sensors in them to detect the rounds going by. Shooting them down was devilishly hard. The guy who flew them usually only brought five to qualify an entire ADA battery of Bradleys or Avengers.

    • m-cameron

      do you feel confident that you could hit a target moving at 80 mph with a rifle?

      • iksnilol

        With machinegun, a spam can, and some vodka to help with shot dispersion? Oh yes.

    • CountryBoy

      The drones aren’t hard, and I can pretty much guarantee you’d never hit the things with a single projectile, since they’re flying at least 60-65 mph and can dodge and weave better than Walther Payton could at his prime!

      • iksnilol

        That’s why we use entire spam can, comrade 😉

        I just have my doubts about shotguns penetrating them at that range.

  • TechnoTriticale

    re: Even better, the company’s “Gnat” features ten pyrotechnic charges on the underside of the drone.

    Needs a change of branding. May I suggest the name Wildfire.

  • Vhyrus

    This post is useless without video.

  • I’m surprised that nobody has brought out a net projectile for the Can Cannon yet.

  • Budogunner

    Thank you for posting this. As a firearms enthusiasts, AND Federally registered Drone Pilot, I appreciate the effort to educate the public.

  • politicsbyothermeans

    The Bushmaster really wasn’t designed for an anti-aircraft roll. Early concepts for the air defense variant of the Bradley mounted the M163 Vulcan but the logisticians won that fight so the Bradley Stinger Fighting Vehicle only had a slightly different crew compartment and otherwise maintained the same logistical footprint of other Brads. Even the Linebacker, which traded the TOW missiles for a four pack of Stingers maintained the same Bushmaster.

    • Well the more I think about it the more it makes sense, given that the US ground forces haven’t been at risk of arial fire since I would guess Korea? Couldn’t find anything via google (all results relate to friendly fire).

      It’s hard to imagine any future conflict the US would be in where boots are on the ground before establishing air superiority. The only possible ariel threat would be small, armed drones/ quadcopters, but ECM is likely to be more effective then a chain gun for those. That or perhaps a 25mm “shotgun” firing tungsten BB’s.