Remington Ammunition Plant Tour (Part 1)

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Over the past several months we’ve been fortunate enough to tour all of Remington’s major facilities for gun manufacturing and ending with this tour of the ammunition plant located in Lonoke, Ar. All of Remington’s ammunition is made at this plant.

The entire compound which includes the original plant, the new extension plant as well as the Remington Gun Club covers some 1200 acres of Arkansas forest and wetlands. In fact the area within the fenced acreage has enough deer and other game for the company employees to hunt.

When the facility was constructed in 1969, and opened in 1970, it was so far removed from any city or services they actually had to construct it to be self sustaining. They even have their own hospital inside the plant which is still in operation today.

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The white pipes in the photo are part of the 14 miles of steam lines. These two photos taken from the top of the shot tower.

The white pipes in the photo are part of the 14 miles of steam lines. These two photos taken from the top of the shot tower.

New extension seen in the background.

New extension seen in the background.

Today there are 1257 employees with 1124 of them full time. The facility is located 20 miles from Little Rock, Ar. off I-40. The plant has 750,000 square feet under roof with the new building extension adding another 74,000 square feet. There are a total of 46 total structures on the property.

Generally they run 3 shifts 5 days per week with 4 shifts 7 days a week 24/7 in some areas. The annual production is 2.6 billion rounds of ammunition and 100 million component products. Nearly 1300 pieces of equipment are used in this high volume facility. The plant also uses 44 million lbs. of lead per year and 12 million pounds of copper per year! Amazingly the entire operation uses 400,000 gallons of water per day! As you travel around the area you’ll notice a large number of steam lines. These lines total 14 miles in length.

Let’s move inside the main plant now and have a look at the raw materials, machinery and various stages of constructing rifle, handgun and shotgun ammunition.

In this set of photos we’ll see the raw lead as it’s received at the plant and then turned into rolls.

As the lead is received at Remington

As the lead is received at Remington

Pressed into rolls

Pressed into rolls

Several rolls moving down the line for the next step in the process.

Several rolls moving down the line for the next step in the process.

After these rolls are placed into another piece of equipment they are spun into uniform diameter loops which will then be cut to length as the lead core for rounds being made or as wadcutters.

Each seperate line going to individual areas of processing.

Each seperate line going to individual areas of processing.

Individual loops of well bullets waiting to be cut as they are fed into another machine depending on whether it's a wadcutter or core.

Individual loops of well— bullets waiting to be cut as they are fed into another machine depending on whether it’s a wadcutter or bullet core.

Here is the lead after it comes out of the next process and dumped into large containers.

These will be cores.

These will be cores.

From another machine this is a 158 grain wadcutter.

From another machine this is a 158 grain wadcutter.

Cores for handgun rounds.

Cores for handgun rounds.

Part 2 will cover the use of brass in making rifle and handgun jackets for various caliber bullets. On this day they will be making 45 acp bullets, British .303 and .380 bullets. I’ll also cover the entire process as the components come together to complete a full loaded round of ammo. Look for part 2 the first of the coming week.

Remington Part 2 Link



Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the Associate Editor and moderator at TFB. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!


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  • TheNotoriousIUD

    First pic reminds me of the Death House in Huntsville.

  • ChierDuChien

    They seem to be running at high capacity.

    Is there an ammunition shortage ?

    • No not really but we do have an election coming up which could cause another ammo run. They didn’t say that just my idea.
      From what I understand they run at high capacity most of the time.

  • Markbo

    Dang..how can I get signed up for some tours ike that?

  • Gorilla Biscuit

    Very interesting. Lots of components being manufactured by Remington. Brass, projectiles, primers, assembling centerfire ammo, rimfire ammo, shotgun ammo. Not sure what of these are outsourced, but very much looking forward to see what else is covered.

    • Nothing is outsourced. The raw materials come in and everything is made on site. More to come:-)

      • Gorilla Biscuit

        Looking forward to it.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe if they stopped scamming people on their mail in rebates they would sell even more ammo. I know many people including myself that have been lied to and denied their rebates and will no longer buy their ammo or firearms.

    • Bill

      Every rebate I have sent in has worked.

      • Sgt. Stedenko

        I got my $100 rebate on the 10 boxes of Golden Sabers purchased around Thanksgiving in January.

  • sk

    I’d like to see the shot tower operation….

  • Sgt. Stedenko

    Phil,
    You need to ask GD OTS for a tour of their Marion, IL facility.
    20, 25, and 30 mm rounds, tracers, propellants, sabots, DU penetrators, 105 and 155 bag charges, 40mm grenades, 80 mm mortar rounds.
    Too bad photos arent allowed.

    • I’d love to see that!

      • Sgt. Stedenko

        I did a weeks worth of industrial hygiene work for them a few years back.
        I was amazed how low tech some of the lines were. A lot of hand work inserting tracers and primers in casings.
        Did you have to wear static dissipating shoes or drag a brass cane around while on the tour?
        GD gets “pops” about once a week from small amounts of propellants or HE getting set off from static discharges. Usually during maintenance activities.

  • brian

    did u talk to employees? the ones on the production lines? very bad place to work. poorly managed and not employee friendly. normally those kinda combinations lead to poor product

  • Tizwicky2009

    I have to say the I was very surprised and more than a little disappointed to see all the original 1970’s era manufacturing equipment! This explains a lot about why we have the chronic supply and demand problems that have been going on for way too long. HOW ABOUT INVESTING SOME OF THOSE MASSIVE CORPORATE PROFITS INTO THE PRODUCTION FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT!!!