C&Rsenal’s 13 Beautiful GIF’s On WW1 Weapons Function

Berthier Mle.16 - Imgur

We posted up earlier on C&Rsenal’s awesome video on how the German Gewehr 1891 functioned. Turns out that C&Rsenal has been busy putting together similar information on the myriad of small arms that were used in The Great War.

Popular Mechanics worked to collate a significant portion of the rifles including offerings from most of the major powers, all put together by a Redditor “Othais,” who Popular Mechanics reports is involved with the C&Rsenal project. Weapons available in the translucent “x-ray” GIF’s include rifles, semi-auto handguns, and an interesting look at the insides of a revolver, specifically the Revolver Mle.1892.

Revolver Mle.1892 - Imgur

Most of the GIF images (and their corresponding YouTube videos) show the full cycling of the selected weapon systems from loading, firing, cycling, and behavior upon an empty feed mechanism.

To me, I enjoy seeing the early weapons designs, especially the various options for a disconnector across all the models. The Mle.1892 revolver is elegant in its simplicity and ingenuity. At the complete opposite of the spectrum is the Mauser C96 “broomhandle,” which is quite complex.

Mauser C96 - Imgur

The project, including additional videos and GIFs is far from over. New “Primers” (a good pun) are introduced on a regular basis including a recent one on the T-Gewehr, the first anti-tank rifle. 

 

Check out the GIF album direct on Imgur or C&Rsenal’s fantastic YouTube channel. 



Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


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  • In your post about C&Rsenal’s “Gewehr 1891” animation, I corrected you that it was a Gewehr 98. Now you allude to it again as a Gewehr 91.

    Welp, alright then.

    • manBear

      Must be doing that just to spite you

      • My money is on phoning it in.

  • Jonathan Ferguson

    Must drop Othais a line about that C96 animation. The disconnector isn’t working as it should. Overall though, these are great.

    • Othais

      You are the first to notice. The plunger and disconnector got separated while I was fixing an alignment issue elsewhere in the animation (one of the earlier ones before I had a better system for doing these) and I didn’t catch I had spread them so far apart. I only noticed it later, after everything was live sadly.

      It will be fixed in the stand-alone since I’ve been going back through to loop them.

      • Jonathan Ferguson

        Ah, no problem. They really are good in any case.

      • Jonathan Ferguson

        By the way, you probably know this, but the original Prototype and Conehammers did work without that long leg on the back of the coupling plunger. The original trigger had a step on the back, and the disconnector was held against this under spring pressure such that the trigger automatically reset whenever you released it. So the Federle brothers did intend for it to work as you had it and as it was described in the original TFB article, but this didn’t last long. I wonder if not having positive disconnection might have led to some runaway guns (an obstruction behind the trigger would keep the sear pressed upward)? Or at least stoppages (depending what happens if the hammer follows the bolt home). In any case, they put a lot of effort into redesigning the trigger, coupling plunger, and disconnector to the system we mostly know now.

  • “Popular Mechanics worked to collate a significant portion of the rifles including offerings from most of the major powers, all put together by a Redditor “Othais,” who Popular Mechanics reports is involved with the C&Rsenal project.”

    Dude, Othais pretty much is C&Rsenal – along with Mae and Jay, but it’s O-man’s baby.

    • Not to mention, you know, he has written here.

  • Mmmtacos

    Why do these animations remind me of Monty Python’s animations?