Advanced Weapon Boresight System (AWBS) by CI Systems

awbs_1

Walt (at BMC Tactical) occasionally breaks out the shop’s .416 so people can shoot $7 of freedom (on New Year’s Day and 4th of July). The problem is that it is not zero’ed for distance shooting. Mainly because he’d rather have people just fire it rather than burn the ammo (and money) on dialing it in.  Personally I’ve never had good luck with bore sighting (I find it easier to just put rounds on paper and start moving out and adjusting; or the two shot method).

Enter CI Systems “a leader in the development and production of sophisticated Electro-Optical Test Equipment and Measurement Systems for defense, homeland security, industrial, scientific and commercial applications worldwide” who is bringing a bore sight system to market which is orders of magnitude more sophisticated than a $30 Sightmark. The Advanced Weapon Boresight System (AWBS) has a wide range of barrel adapters suitable for all barrels – from a diameter of 7.62mm, to 40mm, 125mm, and 155mm (using interchangeable rods). Meaning it will fit multiple platforms from assault rifles through grenade launchers, heavy weaponry, (and even tanks and artillery for those of you that need such things). It aligns the barrel with the weapon sight using the fire control systems to “dramatically increase first hit probability”.

The AWBS consists of a control unit, power unit, optical unit, gun interface, a camera, and an optional ruggedized monitor. Utilizing a high-resolution CCD video camera to allow alignment from a safe distance from the gunner’s post, the AWBS provides an easy to use, fast, accurate and reliable tool for boresighting. Its rugged design retains the accuracy of the system over a wide range of environmental conditions.

According to Moshe Blau, Head of Engineering Department at CI Systems:

“The issue of inaccurate shooting of artillery is a significant problem with serious implications, both in terms of collateral damage and in terms of the costs that accompany inaccurate shooting. The solution we developed is designed to solve this problem, bringing a level of accuracy that has not been seen before. The system has already been deployed by a number of customers, and receives high praises for dramatically increasing shooting accuracy.”

Features include an electronically-produced and adjustable crosshair along with a programmable crosshair pattern. It can be interfaced with existing displays in the vehicle, and provides optional automatic calibration.

Doesn't look as simple to use as my sightmark...

Doesn’t look as simple to use as my Sightmark…

This is obviously meant for a more “military” application rather than the casual shooter.  I couldn’t find a listed price anywhere but I would assume a tad bit more than $30… 🙂



Tom is a former Navy Corpsman that spent some time bumbling around the deserts of Iraq with a Marine Recon unit, kicking in tent flaps and harassing sheep. Prior to that he was a paramedic somewhere in DFW, also doing some Executive Protection work between shifts. Now that those exciting days are behind him, he has embraced his inner “Warrior Hippie” and assaults 14er in his sandals and beard, or engages in rucking adventure challenges while consuming craft beer. To fund these adventures, he writes medical software and builds websites and mobile apps. His latest venture is as one of the founders of IronSights.com; a search engine for all things gun related. He hopes that his posts will help you find solid gear that will survive whatever you can throw at it–he is known (in certain circles) for his curse…ahem, ability…to find the breaking point of anything.


Advertisement

  • micmac80

    Any selfrespecting large caliber unit has built in real time zeroin sytem to account for barrel sag and bend due to sun and head of firing.

    • Ron

      Modern tanks generally have muzzle reference sensors, however howitzers don’t. part of the procedures for laying a howitzer, fire control alignment tests, to ensure the barrel and the sight are aligned.
      The reason tanks have them and howitzers don’t is tanks do direct fire and are attempting to hit point targets, howitzers are area fire weapons and because of the distance involved in their standard usage a munitions based solutions (M982 Excalibur for US forces is an example) for accuracy is required and no amount of tube to sight alignment will allow that type of accuracy.

      • Logic Rules

        The MRS (Muzzle Reference System) isn’t used for boresighting nor can it be. The MRS is used on an already zeroed tank to bring the sights back into alignment with the bore after a number of rounds have been fired (on the M1A1/A2 it’s recommended to perform an MRS update every three rounds). This is done because as the barrel recoils and returns, it doesn’t always return to the exact same position/alignment and can drift more with each shot.

        Boresighting must first be performed to align the sights and bore, and this is done using a Muzzle Bore Device (inserted into the muzzle) to determine the alignment of the bore. After the Computer Correct Factors (fudge factors calculated from average final adjustments required during screening / live fire zeroing) are entered, the sights in MRS mode are aligned to the MRS that’s on the end of the barrel. That initial MRS mode sight aligning does NOT move the primary sight settings; it just creates a fixed reference between the sights and MRS/bore that can later be measured precisely for changes.

        When the gunner later performs an “MRS update” and finds that the sights in MRS mode are off center of the MRS, he adjusts the sights in MRS mode to recenter them with the MRS. This adjustment DOES also move the primary sight settings. In this update, all the sights are being adjusted by the same amount (ideally) that the barrel has moved in order to keep them zeroed. Basically, the sights follow the bore around as it moves between shots in order to maintain the same relative alignment needed to maintain zero.

    • Logic Rules

      The MRS (Muzzle Reference System) isn’t used for boresighting nor can it be. The MRS is used on an already zeroed tank to bring the sights back into alignment with the bore after a number of rounds have been fired (on the M1A1/A2, it’s recommended to perform an MRS update every three rounds). This is done because as the barrel recoils and returns, it doesn’t always return to the exact same position/alignment and can drift more with each shot.

      Boresighting must first be performed to align the sights and bore, and this is done using a Muzzle Bore Device (inserted into the muzzle) to determine the alignment of the bore. After the Computer Correct Factors (fudge factors calculated from average final adjustments required during screening / live fire zeroing) are entered, the sights in MRS mode are aligned to the MRS that’s on the end of the barrel. That initial MRS mode sight aligning does NOT move the primary sight settings; it just creates a fixed reference between the sights and MRS/bore that can later be measured precisely for changes.

      When the gunner later performs an “MRS update” and finds that the sights in MRS mode are off center of the MRS, he adjusts the sights in MRS mode to recenter them with the MRS. This adjustment DOES also move the primary sight settings. In this update, all the sights are being adjusted by the same amount (ideally) that the barrel has moved in order to keep them zeroed. Basically, the sights follow the bore around as it moves between shots in order to maintain the same relative alignment needed to maintain zero.

  • Anonymoose

    125mm and 155mm? How can a laser account for the arc of an indirect fire weapon?

    • Ken

      Pair it with a range finder. That way you can make the appropriate corrections for distance.

    • Ron

      It is designed to ensure the weapon’s sight is aligned to the barrel
      The technical fire solution applied to the sights has nothing to do with bore sight

  • thedonn007

    Move along, nothing to see here.