Keyfob Gun

Keyfob

So some of you may have seen this. I haven’t before. A gun disguised as a key fob was found by police. Pulling the key ring resets the firing pins. Then you press the buttons on top to release them and the gun fires. This would be considered an AOW (Any Other Weapon)

 

Last year Russian Youtube Channel NK12NET built one and documented making it. It looks like he chambered it in .22 short.

 

According to NK12NET, the gun is called the WASP and was made by a Bulgarian engineer.


Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • Tassiebush

    I recall these in something like .32acp being siezed by police here in Australia. A very obscure choice of round for our context I thought.

    • Depends upon the criminal gang they bust in Aussieland that smuggled the guns and ammo in. Those ammo boxes look like they were sold for the US market. In the US its a popular cart for small compact handguns. Europe a ton of police and military guns used them. There are a lot of firearms 90 plus years old that fire them.So a lot of guns on the market use that cart so not surprising they would get smuggled down to the criminal roos.

      • Tassiebush

        I’m not sure they weren’t made locally actually. Then again I suppose the ammo choice might be a sign it was. It’s a pretty obscure round here but I certainly understand that it’s common elsewhere. To give context pocket pistols are banned here so it’s really only full size pistols not exceeding 9mm/.357 Cal that people own legally under the more restrictive licence for handguns. While guns certainly get smuggled in I don’t think there’s much point economically to smuggle ammo. For example a normal gunshop would have cartridges like , .38special, 9mm parabellum 22mag or ..22lr which would all potentially be suitable. Especially the latter two which are very common whilst handguns are less so and purchases more traceable. If somehow a .32acp fullsize handgun was available it’d be quite a pain to find ammo legitimately for it.

        • Ah from what I have read you can only get ammo for the guns that are licensed to you in Aussieland. Hence someone just cannot go pick up ammo and the amount of ammo is also restricted. So it would make sense for gun smugglers to also smuggle in ammo.

          • Tassiebush

            No you can buy ammo for guns you don’t own if you have the right category of licence but purchases are recorded. While in theory there is a limit of ammo i have never heard of this actually being set out. Obviously it’s pretty much unenforceable short of a cap on a purchase size and that doesn’t seem to apply either at least in my state. To detail the categories of licences. There is cat a for Rimfires, shotguns and airguns, cat b for centrefires and muzzleloaders (you can own muzzleloaders and obsolete pre 1900 cartridge firearms without a licence in my state if they aren’t used). There is also cat h for handguns. Basically most shooters have cat a and b and since rifles exist in handgun rounds you can buy the ammo but if it looks unlikely then it might be enough to pique the interest of the police but that is more police intel than actual restriction. The only times I ever heard of ammo being an issue were either that people weren’t licenced for the category of ammo or in one case an order was really dodgy and it might have even been the dealer tipping off police. That case was a guy with a middle eastern surname ordering millions of 7.62×39. Obviously a dodgy looking purchase in a context where semi autos are heavily restricted and it’s an unpopular round for hunting and target shooting plus you just couldn’t get through that quantity as an individual. He turned out to be part of a terrorist plot if I recall correctly and affiliated with some middle eastern crime group.

          • 7.62×39 is used in machine guns and semi autos patterned after the AK and SKS. Millions even in the US would trigger alarm bells from an individual without a business license such as a sporting goods store or website or chain of gunstores. Highest amount somebody could buy at one time is probably a hundred thousand and that would be rare the store that could offer it. You would have to get it direct from the maker if you wanted more including millions. So you admit that a criminal gang would smuggle in ammo and that it would make more sense for criminals to get their ammo from such smuggler gangs then try to straw buy it?.

          • Tassiebush

            I’m sure ammo is occasionally imported by them but it’d be easier logistically and make more sense financially to straw purchase, seek out old stocks or possibly handload since anyone can buy projectiles and brass so the straw purchase could be limited to powder and primers. Criminals basically aren’t big consumers of ammo anyway. I can think of a couple of people off the top of my head with 7.62×39 from pre ban times since the guns were confiscated with compensation but there was no ban or compensation for ammo.
            When you consider the hassles of a smuggler they can mail gun parts or have them shipped in other cargo. I guess ammo can come in particularly in the latter fashion but it’d always be more economically sensible to use space for a gun. Then again I suppose that millions of rounds attempted purchase along with general lifestyle choices of those people does support the premise that these folks aren’t always ones who make logical choices.
            Going back to my original point though it always makes the most sense to go for the commonest cartridges.

  • Andrew

    That’s pretty cool (as “totally useless but I still gotta have it” firearms go). I’d buy one if it was $100-$200 and I could just go into a gun shop and walk out with it. Not cool enough to deal with the AOW hassle though. An NAA revolver in .22short would be a better option in that case.

  • LazyReader

    Like those cricket phasers from star trek

    • Phil Hsueh

      I was thinking the exact same thing. Now if they could only make a housing so you could use it in a more normal fashion like they did in Star Trek that would be really cool.

  • This seems ideally suited to 3D printing out of black plastic.

    • ozzallos .

      If you made it the size of a beach ball…

  • Trey

    In the line of fire.. with Clint Eastwood and John Malkovich comes to mind.

    • TheNotoriousIUD

      “Why’d you shoot that bird a-shole?”

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    I feel sorry for people who have to settle for this.

    • Blake

      I feel sorry for the poor bastard that shoots his balls off with one of these while trying to get his keys out of his pocket…

  • koko

    I love that triumphant stroll the Man-in-Black takes toward the suspect and then his superior look toward the cameraman. Code 2387 – Illegal possession of weapon: twenty years! Code 3768 – illegal possession of double barreled weapon – forty years! You have 10 seconds to confess! Either that – or the comfy chair!

  • Cottersay

    Kind of looks like he’s shooting .22 “CB Caps” or at most a .22 “CB Short” to me; the shortness of the cases, lack of penetration into the pine board, and the probable illegality in Bulgaria of anything more powerful than a weak “parlor round”.