Sturmgewehr Field Strip (STG44/MP44/MP43)

The German Sturmgewehr is one of the most coveted and influential firearms of all time. Advanced collectors seek them out to round out their shrines, but getting behind one is a whole different kind of experience. The low recoil, controllability, and historical significance makes shooting a sturm a very pleasant experience.

So what is underneath all of that stamped metal?

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The full transcript …

– Hey guys it’s Alex C. with TFB TV and for today’s field strip, we’re gonna take a look at a German Sturmgewehr.

Now everyone that looks at these generally says, oh cool StG 44 but there are a lot of these that are marked MP 43 and MP 44 with the StG 44 designation coming later.

The apocryphal story being that Hitler named it the Sturmgewehr.

That’s kind if a dubious story but whatever.

Anyways, they’re very cool looking firearms.

They’re very influential more so in the east and the west.

The west kind of saw it as a last ditch desperation weapon but the east even looked at its cartridge which is essentially cut down eight millimeter on the left and made the cartridge in the middle.

AK 47 round on the right.

But they definitely are very cool looking.

The Soviets made 50 out of…

about 11000 sheets of technical documents.

So it’s kind of a deniable that fate didn’t say, oh that’s actually a pretty good idea.

This was definitely combat proven after all.

I think the very unique looking firearms, they have some cool stamping work that was very necessary.

They also have a threaded barrel to accept the Krummlauf which was a curved barrel attachement to allow to shoot, basically around corners and outside of tanks and what not.

But…

The dust cover looks like it was the father of the M16 dust cover.

May have been, who knows.

And then of course something weird is you fire selector and your safety are actually independent.

The cross bolt button actually changes from semi to full auto.

Now to begin the field strip process, first remove you magazine and set it aside as they are kind of rare and pretty expensive.

And then push out the pin on the rear of the receiver that retains the butt stock.

It is captive so don’t worry about loosing the pin so much.

But watch out for your stock one to pop off of there.

You do not want to break that as it will render your weapon inoperable.

You can also detach the sling if you want to.

Now to remove the bolt group, pivot your trigger group down, a lot like an MP 5, G3 so on and so forth’s trigger group.

Then pull your bolt and carry your group out of the rear of the receiver.

Now to take this apart, simply pull the bolt off of the carrier and remove the firing pin from rear of the bolt.

It looks like a large roofing nail.

And there you have it.

That’s all that’s required to field strip an MP 43, MP 44 or StG 44.

These were really cool guns, they shoot great.

They’re actually one of my favorite firearms to shoot.

They look cool they have a very significant cult following.

People seem to really like these and people are very excited about the upcoming reproductions from HMG.

They’re not gonna be a 100% faithful but it beats paying transform from machine gun prices of course.

And trying to find one which is a…

can be pretty difficult as well.

So…

This point I’d like to thank Ventura Munitions for providing us ammunition for our videos and you for watching.

See you next time guys.

Hey guys it’s Alex C with TFB TV again.

If you liked that video, why don’t you do us a favor and check out our sponsor Ventura Munitions.

They really are a great company and without them videos like this one would not be possible.

Click the link in the description, best place to buy ammo online.

 


Alex C.

Alex is a Senior Writer for The Firearm Blog and Director of TFBTV. A native Texan with a penchant for gun collecting combined with a degree in History from Baylor University have contributed to a passion for both early and modern firearms. You can reach Alex at acapps@gocapps.com.


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  • kevinp2

    Any idea what the price would be for a registered full auto?

    • Malthrak

      $30-40k and up depending on functionality and condition.

      • Much lower.

        • mikee

          All depends! A Rock Island Auction StG 44 with provenance sold for around $300,000 in 2015. Prices for Class III MP43/44/StG44 etc start from about $6,000.

  • Cal.Bar

    Makes me really hope the HMG clone actually works

    • abecido

      I have money set aside if it is delivered and works.

      • De Facto

        Same. I’m waiting to see how they do before I order one. I’ve no need for wall decorations, but I’m really hoping the HMG performs as advertised.

  • mosinman

    my question is, how did a stamped gun end up at around 10 pounds?

    • You would wonder no longer if you saw once in person. They are enormous.

      • mosinman

        i never have but i imagine they are

  • I am… About 99% sure that the dust cover, magazine release, and “shotgun” receiver hinge on the AR-15 are taken from the MP.44. AR-10 Serial No. 1003 (“AR-10A”) of late 1955 had a magazine release inside the trigger guard, no dust cover, and receivers that slid together on rails, and looked like this:

    http://i36.tinypic.com/2itr1au.jpg

    AR-10 Serial No. 1004 (“AR-10B”) of the next year was a radically different design that resembled the AR pattern rifles we know and love today, and featured the push-through magazine release, a conspicuously similar dust cover, and shotgunning receiver halves, all features of the MP.44. It seems likely to me that some time in late 1955 or 1956, the Armalite team got some “good ideas” from a Sturmgewehr they saw somewhere, which were subsequently incorporated into the design of the AR-10:

    http://ww3.rediscov.com/springar/full/12465-SA.A.1.jpg

    The selector lever on the AR-10/15 resembles the MP.44’s as well, though I don’t think it’s derived from that rifle’s. Johnson’s LMG of 1941 features a similar selector/safety on the opposite side, and also is the origin of the straight-line stock characteristic of the AR series (which some have suggested comes from the German FG-42). Johnson worked for Armalite directly on the early AR-10s. All of the AR-10 prototypes before S/N 1004 feature rotary selectors of that type.

    https://www.gunsamerica.com/userimages/129331/993042006/wm_7030544.jpg

  • HKmaster

    Beautiful rifle you got there! I sure hope you do a run and gun with this 🙂