Hornady ELD-X Precision Hunter

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It just wouldn’t be SHOT Show coverage without mention of the Hornady ELD-X (Extremely Low Drag-eXpanding). The brand new round has serious promise for hunters considering it offers highest-in-class ballistic coefficients and reliable expansion at not just a variety of distances but all distances. Hornady themselves explain it best: “At conventional range (0-400 yards), the ELD-X bullet is designed to continually expand throughout its penetration path. Upon impact the thin nose section of the bullet peels back and sheds material until it reaches the thick shank of the bullet jacket where the InterLock ring works to keep the core and jacket together. The remaining heavy shank of the bullet continues to drive forward and expand for extremely lethal results.

Upon contact at extended range (400 + yards), the Heat Shield™ tip drives backward into the carefully designed nose cavity to begin the expansion process. At these lower velocities, the ELD-X™ bullet exhibits conventional expansion characteristics with a large mushroom and high retained weight ensuring deep penetration and large wound cavities.”

The ELD-X looks like an awesome round and I’m looking forward to doing some hunting with it. Hornady manufactures more than one round known for being reliable and delivering fantastic terminal performance, and this looks to be another to add to their “win” column.

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katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


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  • Abram

    Highest in class BC? For the expanding long range .30 caliber rifle bullet, the Nosler Accubond LR beats it on paper. Reckon I’ll have to see if it beats it on ‘bullseye’ paper. I like that manufacturers are continuing to push the limits; more quality and choices=more better!

    Hornady ELD-X
    .30 Caliber 178 grain – Ballistic Coefficient (G1) 0.535 /SD 0.268

    .30 Caliber 200 grain – Ballistic Coefficient (G1) 0.626/SD 0.301

    .30 Caliber 212 grain – Ballistic Coefficient (G1) 0.673/SD 0.319

    Nosler Accubond LR

    .30 Caliber 190 grain – Ballistic Coefficient (G1) 0.640/SD 0.286
    .30 Caliber 210 grain – Ballistic Coefficient (G1) 0.730/SD 0.316

    Source – Hornady and Nosler websites, respectively

    • LV-426

      Hornady is touting actual Doppler verified BCs. Legitimate BCs are much more useful to the end user. Higher listed BC’s sell bullets, just like velocity, and magical names.

      • Abram

        Fair enough. As I don’t know at this time how exactly Nosler determines the coefficient of their bullets, I will, as mentioned above, have to verify on ‘bullseye’ paper which bullet my rifle prefers. Another good reason for me to spend the money on a chronograph.

        • AD

          I believe there was an article in G&A last issue talking about this round. It seems that Hornady found out that their polymer-tipped bullets were not maintaining the expected BC out past a certain range. They figured out that the polymer tips were melting and that was affecting the BC. So they used a more heat-resistant polymer, and that led to better performance past a certain range. I believe that is the basis of their claim of “best in class BC”.

          I don’t know either way, just parroting what I heard.

    • Adam

      Noslers BC figures are WAY off… Computer generated. Hornady’s are actually tested with real world live fire over Doppler Radar…..