New: Dead Air Armament “Pyro”

pyro1

Dead Air Armament was founded by seasoned silencer pro Mike Pappas and designer Todd Magee with one goal in mind: building the best specialized products in the industry. It’s a lofty goal, for sure, but in founding Dead Air Armament and setting to work designing and manufacturing suppressors – among other things – they’ve made their mark on the gun world. Now they’ve come out with something new for 2016: the Pyro.

The Pyro isn’t a suppressor, it’s a muzzle brake, but according to the company it isn’t just any muzzle brake. It’s the Pyro Enhanced Muzzle Brake and it’s being released just in time for SHOT Show 2016. This is a unique muzzle brake, one designed not only to do the job of directing muzzle flash away from the operator but to function specifically in CQB situations. It’s 2.9″ long and weighs 5.5 ounces. According to the company it’s manufactured for durability and longevity just like all their products and has a Cerakote finish. Perhaps best of all, Dead Air Armament backs the Pyro with a no questions asked lifetime guarantee. MSRP $259.

Mike Pappas, Dead Air Armament’s director of product development, had a few words to say about the company’s newest addition: “If you don’t live in a free state that allows you to own one of our Sandman suppressors, you should get yourself a Dead Air Pyro. You’ll like it. Trust me.” I’m guessing you’re going to like it even if you do live in a state that allows suppressors, especially given the paperwork, money, and time involved in obtaining a suppressor (although all that effort is certainly worth it, a good suppressor is a wonderful thing not only for target shooting but for hunting).

 

Take a look online for more details at http://deadairsilencers.com/product/pyro-enhanced-muzzle-brake/

If you’re interested in learning more about the Sandman suppressor, visit http://deadairsilencers.com/product/sandman-s/


katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. She studied Biology and veterinary medicine in college and worked in emergency veterinary medicine for more than a decade prior to becoming a full-time writer. In addition, she has years of experience as a handler in K9 SAR. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about firearms, the military, and politics for a number of major publications both online and in print. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


Advertisement

  • iksnilol

    Was thinking about the length of these muzzle devices.

    The suppressor a friend of mine bought is 87mm long (3.4 inch) ahead of the muzzle. Seems to me that the half inch extra is more than worth it (both in regards to recoil and flash reduction + sound).

    I just don’t understand why the telescopic (“reflex”) designs aren’t being explored more. Shouldn’t be too hard to make a reflex comp or brake. Would be wider but could probably be made to not add more length than an A2 flash hider.

    • CommonSense23

      They are heavy, and you typically need a dedicated rail for it. They are not as efficient as a normal can.

      • iksnilol

        Dedicated rail? For a muzzle device? You mean a wider handguard?

        They are more efficent than a normal can, since everything is the same, just the empty space is pushed back. Weight is almost the same, can be further reduced with modern materials.

        • CommonSense23

          Yeah, the handguard, referring to it in a tactical sense. My experience with them. Weight isn’t the same. The can has to be physically bigger due to the going over the barrel itself. There are also not that efficient apparently. Its a large difference to.

          • Lee Attiny

            You can easily do a form 1 reflex-style can with 1.5″ diameter. And how are they not efficient? You can get an 8″ normal suppressor or an 11″ reflex can with 8″ in front of the barrel and 3 behind and i guarantee you it will work better

          • ostiariusalpha

            The OSS overbarrel suppressors are fairly compact and effective, and unlike a lot of engineering solutions, they aren’t terribly more expensive than the baffle type moderators.

  • Jay

    That must be really fun to clean.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      Kinda self-cleaning.

  • G0rdon_Fr33man

    260 bucks, hahaha….

    • OCD_Weaponry

      cmon man its easy to mock the creators of something but its alot harder to go and create something like these guys did. Not to mention research and development isnt free

  • LV-426

    Id love to know what this expensive expensive (that’s double expensive) machined device will do mo better than these??

    • ostiariusalpha

      Those aren’t muzzle brakes.

    • iksnilol

      Uh, they’d reduce recoil. Because those aren’t brakes.

  • gunsandrockets

    So the Pyro is a $260 blast defuser that mounts on their proprietary $89 muzzle brake?

    • ostiariusalpha

      Eh, more like a $170 QD flash hider/diffuser attachment, the $89 brake is part of the package with the Pyro according to the website. It would be nice to know how well it does versus a Precision Armament $110 AFAB or $160 EFAB, which are very effective hybrid muzzle devices, though they don’t have the QD capability to be swapped with a suppressor.

  • whskee

    something something ‘neva been done befo’…

  • Wetcoaster

    At some point, an extra 3″ of barrel has got to be more useful than 3″ of brake…

    • Edeco

      Yup. People say it’s important for slicing the cake and killing houses*, but the short hose + muzzle-device thing, especially in a 5.56 AR seems like burning the candle at both ends to me**.

      *facetious
      **sincere