Ruger Enters The Silencer Market With The Silent-SR

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Ruger continues to expand its operation into areas it was previously unwilling to enter. This latest entry is a .22 caliber suppressor/silencer that fits their line of threaded .22 caliber rifles and pistols, like the 10/22 and the SR-22. Ruger said the following about the new suppressor, on their website:

The Ruger® Silent-SR sound suppressor features best-in-class materials and advanced design, resulting in a lightweight, compact size and top-tier sound reduction. It was designed and built by Ruger utilizing the very latest in fluid dynamic simulation and computer numeric controlled (CNC) machining equipment. The Ruger® Silent-SR is easy to disassemble and clean. Each piece snaps together to seal the baffles and keep the byproducts of combustion away from the tube and end caps. It is also strong and light, utilizing a titanium tube, aluminum rear cap, and stainless steel threaded mount, baffles and front cap. Ruger has selected the best material for each part to maximize strength and minimize weight without sacrificing durability.

Also:

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  • Reduces sound pressure levels of .22 LR, .22 WMR and .17 HMR pistols and rifles by up to 40 dB.
  • Rated for .22 LR full auto, .22 WMR and .17 HMR pistols and rifles. Features a standard 1/2”-28 thread pattern for compatibility with most threaded rimfire firearms.
  • Patent-pending outer tube and muzzle mount are interlocked to prevent accidental disassembly when removing the suppressor from your firearm. Disassembly tool is included.
  • With a 5.37″ length, 1.06″ diameter and 6.3 ounce weight, the Silent-SRis compact and lightweight for balance and portability.
  • Easy to disassemble and clean, each piece snaps together to seal the baffles and keep the byproducts of combustion away from the tube and end caps.
  • Utilizing a titanium tube, aluminum rear cap, and stainless steel threaded mount, baffles and front cap, Ruger has selected the best material for each part to maximize strength and minimize weight without sacrificing durability.

As noted by Caleb at Gun Nuts Media (hat tip, by the way), NFA sales have been soaring in recent years, so Ruger’s addition of a suppressor to their lineup comes as little surprise. The recent elimination of the Chief Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) signature requirement for NFA sales will likely allow even more people to lawfully participate in owning suppressors, short-barreled weapons, and machine guns.

With the release of the new Ruger American 9mm and .45 ACP duty handgun, one can only speculate whether Ruger will continue to expand their suppressor lineup to include those two calibers, as well as possibly a .30 caliber suppressor for their Mini-14 in .300 Blackout, which already comes equipped with a threaded barrel. I am sure Ruger is watching the sales of the new .22 caliber can carefully, with an eye towards the possibility of introducing silencers in new calibers, but I also have very little doubt the Ruger suppressors will sell well.



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He can be reached via email at nathaniel.f@staff.thefirearmblog.com.


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  • Serious Man Serious Question

    Ruger brand ruger RPG when?

  • Nicholas Chen

    No estimated price? Or did I miss it?

    • thedonn007

      $449 MSRP, plus tax stamp of course.

      • Cymond

        At first I was like “Ouch! that’s more expensive than a Sparrow or Mask”, but then I remembered that Ruger MSRPs are always excessive.

  • plumber576

    No pictures of the side with the giant warning label?
    “MAY CAUSE HEARING PROTECTION. READ WARNINGS AND MANUAL FIRST.”

  • joshv06

    I am surprised that they couldn’t make it lighter. My Spectre .22 has a Steel outer tube and is half an inch longer, and has a steel end cap while being the same weight as this. This can has a Ti outer tube.

    • thedonn007

      There is not much weight savings in the tube.

    • Spencerhut

      Come on it’s Ruger. Home of the “If you run out of ammo you can beat them to death with it” revolver. I’m surprised it does not have finger grooves in for use as a club.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      I’m certain they overbuilt this thing. They never want to have warranty calls on a silencer. For a small silencer shop they can’t handle that easily, for a big company who happens to make a can its a hassel logistically. They’ll always have less informed staff and more overhead.

      They also know people will put it on their 223 guns, more often than the discerning owner of a sparrow or spectre. Both of which already hold up to a few shots, I’m sure Ruger could go lighter but either skimped on engineering/development and/or overbuilt the can to be tougher than most because….

      Let’s face it, it’s nothing but excellent Ruger has a line of silencers coming. Burn the experienced NFA owner isn’t going to buy this can specifically.

      • Kivaari

        Yep, if it screws on they will screw it on to anything they have. I like it.

    • tony

      I would presume most the weight come from these ss baffles

  • iksnilol

    Ruger making suppressors?

    I should expect baffle strikes, outdated, complicated and of course overpriced.

    Seriously, Ruger, you make good manual action rifles and revolvers.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      The baffles look good. Same idea B&T and KAC use/used.

      • iksnilol

        I am not trusting Ruger with anything needing precision.

        Tho the baffle design looks very interesting.

      • Netpackrat

        So, I guess if other suppressors use “K” baffles or “M” baffles, would it be correct to refer to Ruger’s as “P” baffles? 8^)

        • iksnilol

          “V” baffles because one of them kinda looks like female genitalia.

          • Netpackrat

            Same line of thinking.

          • iksnilol

            I didn’t want to say it at first since people would have thought I was immature.

  • derfelcadarn

    Silencers defeat everything handguns are about convenience and concealability. You may as well carry a pistol grip shotgun or rifle and at least get some serious firepower.for. the effort

    • Borat

      Nobody is buying a suppressor to carry concealed. You buy a handgun suppressor for having fun and/or hearing protection.

      • Cal S.

        Or super-sneaky operations. Your choice.

      • G0rdon_Fr33man

        They are not really helpful if you train to become a good pistol marksman. Weight & balance issues…

        Really just useful for plinking…

        …or black operations in the mall.

        • iksnilol

          Uh, I beg to differ.

          Easier to shoot with both in regards to sound/recoil and pointability.

          • Borat

            I agree, suppressors will also add stability. A good analogy would be the stabilizers used in archery. The longer your stabilizer, the easier it is to stay on target.

          • G0rdon_Fr33man

            Not at all. Have you tried running and gunning in IPSC with a suppressed pistol? Not much pointability to trace..

          • iksnilol

            I don’t shoot IPSC but I find a suppressed pistol handles better. For me at least.

    • Durrr durrr

      Yeah because it’s impossible to carry both on your person and then thread it together when you’re going to shoot…..

      • iksnilol

        Or get a holster that accomodates the suppressor + the gun.

        You could go for one of those push through holsters if OCing.

    • Laserbait

      Hahaha, you think people only buy handguns for convenience and/or concealability?! That’s funny stuff right there!

    • cnnspy

      That is not what they are for. Sticking one on the “concealed” handgun on your belt (in Texas) is frowned upon if the gun has to be used. Sure it looks cool but it cannot be used in self defense. Might as well get an airsoft if you want to do that. It weighs less too. Silencers are used for the same purpose as your car has a muffler. It is not much fun to ride in a noisy car.

  • Jeff Smith

    I’m happy to see they aren’t making some funky proprietary thread pattern.

    • Laserbait

      Why would they? It’d be incompatible with all the guns they sell that are threaded already.

      • Jeff Smith

        True. I was thinking about Sig’s decision to use a slightly less common thread pitch on their suppressors that matches their handguns. It’s an easy way to push a company’s new product – buy the gun and the suppressor to fit it.

        • Netpackrat

          The left handed thread pitch is more common with European pistols, and has the effect of reducing the tendency of a suppressor to loosen in use because it opposes the twist of most rifling.

      • iksnilol

        Left hand threads are superior on barrels with right hand rifling.

        • Laserbait

          That may be, but the threads that are already on the barrel are superior to cutting and rethreading.

          • iksnilol

            If those threads are right handed they are still inferior.

    • Kefefs

      Where did this “proprietary everything” meme regarding Ruger come from? Was it just their 5.56 Scout not using AR mags?

      • Jeff Smith

        I was thinking more of other companies like Sig beginning to make suppressor that use threads that are specific to their handguns. (13.5×1 LH)

  • USMC03Vet

    I’ll never understand the allure of silencers for a .22

    • Borat

      You don’t like to have fun?

      • USMC03Vet

        You got me. I’m anti fun.

        Mission failed.

    • Laserbait

      It’s only useful for people that still have their hearing. .22LR is pretty loud, especially out of a handgun.

    • Nashvone

      I could never convince myself to spend as much or more than I spent on the pistol just to have a suppressor. And then, there’s the tax stamp and the sub-sonic ammo.

      • iksnilol

        Most .22 ammo is subsonic. 1050 fps is subsonic.

        + most of the higher velocity ammo is subsonic out of a pistol length barrel (4.5 inches).

    • uisconfruzed

      Extra stability, quiet, fun, steel plates have a more satisfying ring, perfect for teaching handgun handling, etc,etc.

  • nova3930

    Baffles that look like they’ve had a baffle strike is interesting. Love to see what the flow looks like around those…

  • Kivaari

    Excellent. We need them made fully lawful without hassle everywhere. I avoid buying one, simply because I hate doing the paperwork. Good people should not be prevented from owning them without all the trouble. Bad guys don’t care they don’t use nice registered suppressors, they make ’em and often leave ’em behind. That happens maybe once every 5 years.

    • AmericanRemnant

      I agree, the only paperwork there should be is hand over the cash and get back your change and the receipt.

      • iksnilol

        I don’t know, those magnum suppressors make decent if not good batons.

  • Kivaari

    It’s nice to see it can be disassembled and cleaned.

    • iksnilol

      Considering how dirty .22 ammo can be (and the quanitities it is fired in) it is stupid to make it a sealed unit.

  • lifetimearearesident

    I agree with other posters that a silencer changes point of balance and is hardly a good attachment for and sort of concealed carry situation. But for going to a range and for fun rifles like my 15-22 silencers are great. Center fire rifle silencers are even better because they give neighbors near the range less noise which at least in my experience is a major reason why neighbors complain about outdoor gun ranges near their home. In summary: more use of silencers = less noise = fewer complaining neighbors = more open gun ranges.

  • jcitizen

    Well I didn’t want an SR-22 …. till now!

  • iksnilol

    American suppressors in general are outdated (see the part where everybody claims they did a first which has been done to death in Europe).

    Ruger MKwhatevs is complicated and don’t forget how overpriced the Mini-14 and 10/22 are. I like their revolvers (not a revolver dood tho, I mean, I even like Taurus) and their bolt actions aren’t bad (the American series are nice budget rifles).

    tho I mainly don’t like Ruger because of the 10/22. At best it is a mediocre rifle yet it is priced like a decent or good one. I mean, it’s so good people change out every part except for the stock screw.

    • Laserbait

      How much is your dealer raping you that you think a 10/22 is overpriced?!

      • iksnilol

        Well, I look at what I get.

        A 10/22 (used) is about 200-250 dollars, a new 10/22 is 250-300 dollars. Considering you can get a Marlin 795 that is more accurate while costing 100-150 dollars I would call the 10/22 overpriced. After upgrades such as improved trigger, trigger guard, trigger springs and Tech-Sights the 795 is still cheaper than a new 10/22.

        • Laserbait

          Ouch! New here, 10/22’s are about $179, while the 795 is about $150. My 795 and and my 10/22 are about the same for accuracy.

          • iksnilol

            Um, I was quoting US prices (from Gunbroker and various online shops). You don’t wanna know Norwegian gun prices (something to do with very high personal income).

    • uisconfruzed

      I even replaced my stock screw on my 10/22, the bolt is still original 🙂

      “American suppressors in general are outdated” shoot me some links, I’m pleased with my TBAC Ultras & SilencerCo Sparrow.

      • iksnilol

        The Sparrow is awesome.

        Maybe outdated is the wrong term. What I mean is that somebody makes something new (in the US) which is old in the rest of the world, then they claim they did a first. See the shotgun suppressor Silencerco made. Or modular suppressors recently.

        That and all the American suppressors seem longer and heavier than they need to be. For instance, 20 cm suppressor isn’t unusual in the US. For me a suppressor that extends OAL by over 15 cm is unacceptable. 10 cm is the norm.

        • Netpackrat

          When you have to wait for many months, jump through a bunch of paperwork hoops, and pay a $200 tax for something that is basically yours for life, you kind of want it to last for life. So, US made silencers tend to be more heavily built, which translates into greater size and weight.

          When your silencer is an over the counter item that you can pick out and leave with the same day, and just as easily replaced, then durability can take a back seat to squeezing every last bit of performance out of it, and cutting out every possible ounce of weight. And under those same circumstances, buying a new one for each firearm you own that will accept one makes a lot of sense. And buying just one can with the capacity to work on multiple firearms makes less sense.

          • iksnilol

            I don’t really buy that one. Plenty of people only have one or two suppressors in Norway, and they keep them pretty much for life.

          • Netpackrat

            And how many of them use ammunition in the same sorts of quantities as many here in the US do, particularly those of us who are willing to go through the process of buying a can?

            I can only speak for myself, but when I bought my rifle can, I opted for a model that was maybe not as light as I could have bought; rather it is light enough but still of heavy duty construction. It’s manufacturer markets it as a “machine gun silencer”. I use it on 4 different hosts so far, including a couple of SBRs plus a 16″ .308, and I’ve sometimes gone through hundreds of rounds in one afternoon of shooting (and I’m a piker compared to many). I hopefully still have a few decades worth of shooting left in me, so I chose durability over ultimate performance.

          • iksnilol

            Pro comp shooters don’t mind thousands of rounds in a month. Cheap stuff like 5.56 or 7.62×39.

            For me? 50 rounds of .22 a week is more than enough. Though there’s plenty of fudds who only shoot 3-4 boxes before hunting season. I’d say the average target shooter goes through something like 50-100 rounds of 308 or similar in a week.

  • Budogunner

    I’m not seeing a way to index the baffles. Anybody have an idea if there is some less visible feature that ensures proper clocking of baffles?

  • iksnilol

    The norm in Europe is for the can to extend about 4 inches for “normal” centerfire cartridges like 308, 6.5×55 and .223. magnum cartridges such as the H&H or Brenneke cartridges (both are big 9mm) the norm is either for it to be the same (albeit with reduced noise reduction) or to extend 15 cm. Note how I say extend, half of the can or more goes behind the muzzle. I’ve seen cans that extend 10 cm, whilst going 20 cm behind the muzzle.

    Noise reduction is about 25-30 decibel.

    Cans that don’t go behind the muzzle I consider 15 cm (6 inches) to be max acceptable. Anything more than that and balance gets screwed, even with short barrels.

    • uisconfruzed

      I like the idea of the can to be further back. The only one I’ve seen is the KAC, it’s too heavy and to expensive.

      • iksnilol

        Plenty of lightweight cans here. Popular for hunting rifles. Even modular cans with bits that can be removed or added to increase length and suppression, or removed to be even handier. Check out A-Tec to see what I am talking about.

        18 inch barrel + 4 inches of suppressor is a popular configuration for stuff like 308.

  • Cymond

    I wonder in they’ll allow suppressed guns in the Ruger Rimfire Challenge now.