Optic Review: Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm Tactical Scope

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The original Burris XTR 1-4x24mm is one of the best 1-4x tactical scopes on the market. Recently Burris replaced the 1-4x model with a much improved 1-5x24mm XTR Gen 2 model. It’s interesting that Burris elected to use a 1-5x ratio instead of 1-6x like others. The main benefit of featuring a 5x ratio is the price. While a decent 1-6x scope starts at $1000 with the top-end 1-6x models at over $2000. The new Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm tactical scope has a street price of $800, which is just slightly more than the old XTR 1-4x original.

 

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Burris offers two reticle choices for the XTR II 1-5x24mm model. The Ballistic 5.56 G3 reticle is optimized for the 5.56mm caliber with BDC to 1000 yards. The Ballistic CQ Mil reticle offers plain hashmarks in Mils for any caliber. Burris includes the ballistic info for some of the popular .223 Rem and .308 Win ammo for both reticles here.

 

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The Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm tactical scope offers a true 1x at the low end. Also new to the 2nd generation of the XTR line is the daylight visible reticle illumination. The illuminated horseshoe and dot at the center is bright enough that I have no problem seeing it even on a very sunny day. The field of view and eyebox are quit good for its price point.

 

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I found the Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm to be a good all-around performer optically. However, it also has some trade-offs such as its battery life is relatively short and it’s longer length than most of the 1-4x and 1-6x scopes. At over 21 ounces, it a quit heavy for its class. Another change is that it’s now made in the Burris factory in the Philippines instead of the Burris’ Colorado, USA facility like the original XTR 1-4x.

 

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The T&E sample that I received is the combo package that includes the XTR II 1-5x24mm scope already mounted in Burris PEPR 1-piece 30mm mount. There’s also the Burris FastFire III mini reflex sight attached to the scope with a 45-degree off-set scope tube mount.

 

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The adjustment turrets don’t have a locking feature but both have zero-stop build-in, which allows quick return to the zero. The adjustment is 1/10 Mil per click. The turrets feel great with a nice positive tactile click to them.

 

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The Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm tactical scope works great with my testing platform, the Aero Precision M5 AR-10 style rifle with the 16-in medium contour barrel.

 

Burris XTR II 1-5x24mm Tactical Scope Specification:

Magnification: 1x-5x
Tube size: 30mm
Objective lens size: 24mm
Ocular lens size: 44.25mm
Length: 11.3 inch
Weight: 21.1 ounch
Power: 1x CR2032 lithum battery
Reticle: 2nd focal plant
Illumination: Daylight visible, 11 levels
Parallax: Fixed
Eye Relief: 3.5-4.25 inch
Exit Pupil: 12-4.8mm
Field of View: 108-21.5 ft
Adjustment: 1/10 Mil per click
Street Price: $800 to $1100 (the combo package as reviewed)

 



Writer and gear editor with articles published in major gun publications. A five year combat veteran of the US Marine Corps, Tim is also part of Point & Shoot Media Works, a producer of photography, video and web media for the firearms and shooting sport industry. Tim’s direct contact: Tyan.TFB -at- gmail.com


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  • Twilight sparkle

    Primary arms has a fairly decent 1-6 for well under $1000

    • Stan Darsh

      I really do like the ACSS on the P.A. 1-6×24 scope.

    • Dracon1201

      The ACSS reticle alone is a good reason to buy PA.

  • Treyh007

    It’s really hard to beat the new Vortex Strike Eagle 1-6 for around $329. Plus lifetime warranty.

    • Timothy G. Yan

      Cheap =/= good. Clarity issue, fisheye, lack of true 1x nor daylight illumination….a long list of drawbacks from the re-branded Optisan and its half dozen variants with other brand labels.

      • Badwolf

        I agree. But depends on use too. If you’re not an operator like most people, its good enough

      • cwp

        This is the kind of thing I’d love to see more of in scope reviews — where a given scope is better or worse than the lower-priced, comparably-priced, and higher-priced stuff. A wide-ranging comparison test of low-power variables would be even better.

        As much as we’d all like to have unlimited optics budgets, the unfortunate truth is that most of us don’t, and we have to compromise somewhere. One of the most useful things a gear review can tell me is whether I’m giving up something I really *need* when I move down in price.