BREAKING: Stag Arms’ Federal Firearms License Revoked!

Image credit: Michael McAndrews, via Hartford Courant

Image credit: Michael McAndrews, via Hartford Courant

Connecticut gun manufacturer Stag plead guilty today to violating federal law, including the loss of 200 firearms from its record books, and the possession of 62 machine guns or receivers for machine guns not registered to the company. In the plea agreement that to the revocation of the company’s Federal Firearms License, owner Mark Malkowski agreed to sell Stag and never own another gun company again. The Hartford Courant reports:

HARTFORD — New Britain-based Stag Firearms LLC pleaded guilty Tuesday to violating federal firearms laws and as part of a plea agreement company president and owner Mark Malkowski agreed to sell the company and have no further ownership or management role in a gun manufacturer.

The company, with Malkowski serving as its representative, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Hartford to a single felony count of possession of a machine gun not registered to the company.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is also revoking Stag’s federal license to manufacture firearms.

Malkowski is also scheduled to plead guilty Wednesday in U.S. District Court in New Haven to a misdemeanor count of failure to maintain firearms records.

The federal government began its investigation of Stag in July 2014, after a routine Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms inspection turned up a variety of recording keeping violations, missing firearms and unregistered firearms, the government said.

The guilty plea, Stag said in a prepared statement, was in the best interest of the company and its approximately 100 employees. Malkowski is in advanced talks with a New York private equity firm to sell the company, Stag and the government said.

“For the first time in Connecticut, and there have only been a few of these prosecutions throughout the nation, a large manufacturer is pleading guilty to a felony charge relating to record keeping violations,” Connecticut U.S. Attorney Deirdre M. Daly said Tuesday. The company will pay a fine of $500,000 as part of the plea agreement.

For his guilty plea, Malkowski, 37, will pay a $100,000 fine and will not be permitted to own, operate or manage a firearms company.

“This company did not just manufacture small firearms. They manufactured semi-automatic weapon, machine guns, assault weapons,” Daly said. “This is not an industry where sloppiness will be tolerated.”

The government said 200 firearms were stolen or lost from Stag, although there is no evidence those firearms fell into the hands of criminals or others not permitted to possess guns.

The company specifically pleaded guilty to possession of 62 machine guns and machine gun receivers that were registered to another entity or not registered at all. ATF agents found the automatic rifles and receivers at the New Britain factory during an inspection July 15, 2014.

Stag, in a statement, said the company “takes its obligations to comply with all laws and regulations very seriously and has made comprehensive changes to ensure that similar problems cannot happen again and that best compliance practices are maintained in all of its operations.”

It goes without saying that firearms manufacturers must keep absolutely watertight records, and that playing around with ‘grey areas’ of firearms law is a recipe for disaster. Whether what Stag and Malkowski were doing was willfully criminal, or just negligent, remains to be seen.

Back in May, Stag was raided by the BATFE and over 100 unmarked lower receivers were seized. The receivers were part of a batch that was not serialized within the requisite time. The BATFE also seized several computers during the raid, which likely helped lead to the plea deal reached today. The information found on those computers would have made clear discrepancies in Stag’s records to ATF auditors.

I am reminded of the ATF’s raid and subsequent liquidation of Sabre Defense. Stag Arms will likely recover from this, although Malkowski’s involvement in Stag or any other company has clearly ended.



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He can be reached via email at nathaniel.f@staff.thefirearmblog.com.


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  • Mister Thomas

    They lost 200 firearms? Who do they think they are, the federal government?!??

    *Fast and Furious. Eric Holder. Not held accountable for lost firearms now in the hands of Mexican drug cartel. But then again, you knew what I was talking about.

    • BryanS

      I find it interesting that this is the line in the sand for a lot of gun owners. They skipped registration in states, buy up and ignore lots of unlawful regulations and shoulder braces everywhere just to poke ire at the ATF, but this, which is in contempt of one of the most egregious pieces of legislation to ever smack the face of the constitution, is the line in the sand for gun owners.

      We wont sit at the back of the bus, well, unless that bus is the direct line.

      • kbatku

        Not sure what “egregious” piece of legislation you are talking about – registering machine guns?

        • Kivaari

          NFA ’34 and GCA ’68 are examples of overreach by government. No gun should be unlawful to own. Only misuse of them should matter. No, that doesn’t mean we should have a nuke in the garage.

          • Spencerhut

            If a person had a machine gun and never harmed a sole with it, how is that different than having a nuke or a 40 megawatt laser blaster thingy and you never harm a sole?

          • Major Tom

            It means you’re a shoe’s best friend? 😀

          • Kivaari

            I don’t have an issue with a laser. Nukes have the hazard of being radioactive. A house fire, tornado, flooding, hurricane with flooding, wildfires and other natural or manmade disasters could spread the nuclear material, even if the tritium fuses-triggers are secured elsewhere. Without the nuke material I couldn’t care less. Lasers used for target practice would be quite fun. Misuse of any weapon I the issue. Until 1968 we used to shoot dynamite for recreation. Then the leftist radicals blew up too many government facilities and took our fun away.

          • Ben Pottinger

            The problem with the nuke isn’t really the radioactive material. Nuclear bomb cores are not really very “hot” to be honest and can safely be handled without excessive radiation accumulation. All the nasty radioactivity happens after you blow it up (and a non nuclear explosion of a nuclear bomb would create a very poor dirty bomb. A true dirty bomb wouldn’t use fissile material it would focus on very hot and bio available radioactive material like iodine, cesium, etc).

            No the real problem with owning a nuclear bomb is 1) it’s against the law (globally) to detonate one in the air or in the ground, and I believe it’s even verboten to do a underground burst now as well. 2) storage. You need a “magazine” to legally store explosives. Since even a small nuke breaks things apart at the atomic level in a perfect sphere out to thousands of yards (depending on yield) your going to need a very VERY large “magazine” with your toy nuke mounted dead center.

            If you managed to make it through all those hurdles and convince the world to let you do one last atmospheric test all I ask is that you sell tickets. I want to see it go off! 😉

          • MichaelZWilliamson

            That’s not entirely correct. You will soak up rads from a bomb core. But the magazine doesn’t have to be any bigger than that used for most conventional bombs.

          • Kivaari

            Do you remember back circa 10 years ago, when several Russian woodcutters found about 6 bomb cores and found them to be warm. So they huddled around them for comfort only to get irradiated – to death. A nuke getting burned in a house fire isn’t a good thing. You may remember when Tibbits decided to leave the arming plugs in place for takeoff. His crew was getting ready to launch, when another B29 crashed on takeoff and burned. I don’t want any nuke material floating around. You may also remember when some Mexican patio tables had radioactive bases. The scrap dealer had found a container of medical material and threw it into the mix as they cast the bases. I don’t like having that around.

          • Ben Pottinger

            The thing is it’s just not that simple. Saying “nuke material” is like saying “chemicals”. Some are basically harmless (from a radiological perspective) and others are frighteningly dangerous! PU239 (the plutonium isotope used in most “nukes”) has a half life of 24,100 years and is not a radiation hazard (outside of a critical mass). Same goes for U235 (the other bomb material) with a half life of 703.8 million years or U238 with a 4+ billion year half life. Radium on the other hand is frighteningly radioactive and has a heavy bio-load (your body loves to grab it and store it in bones) and emits large amounts of alpha radiation which is harmless *outside* your body but terrible when inside your body. Half life is only part of the story though, technetium-99m has a 6hr half life and a biological half life of 1 day and emits a low energy gamma ray making it perfect for medical imaging. It’s the most used medical isotope in the world. Pu238 is used in NASAs RTG generators for satellites and space probes. It has an 87 year half life and emits copious amounts of alpha radiation. Alpha particles are easily shielded against making it perfect for a long term heat and power source. That material absolutely would heat itself enough to be used as a Russian firepit, lol. It would also be very unhealthy.

            Now, while the bomb material itself may not be an immediate radiation hazard like pu240 or cesium or similar, it is a HUGE radiation hazard once enough material is collected in close enough proximity to start a fission chain reaction. Once it reaches criticality it will heat up well past the materials melting point in microseconds, release acutely fatal levels of neutrons and boil/cook anything it’s stored in (water, etc). I read about a criticality accident in a reprocessing plant back in the 60s where a worker poured a large container of enriched U235 (in solution) into a round mixer bowl (it was normally stored in giant 4-5 foot tall and skinny plastic tubes). Because the bowl was round it allowed the material to collect into a “critical” shape and it became a unshielded nuclear reactor for a few milliseconds. Long enough to boil off a large amount of the solution and ending the reactor process. Sadly for the operator he collected roughly 18,000 rem in those few milliseconds. 1000 rem is virtually 100% fatal.

          • Kivaari

            The Arco Idaho disaster was a result of not having a limiter on a control rod. The worker was pulling it out and went just a little too small. It literally nailed him t the roof of the reactor. The other two workers ran for the exist and were so irradiated that they dropped in their track. The local volunteer fire department responded earlier in the day and it was a false alarm. On the second call thy didn’t drive as fast. When they got there they got light gear on including gas masks. They entered deep enough to see the two dead workers and hurriedly backed out. It was a major clean up effort. Pretty much everything was taken down, canned and buried at Hanford.
            There was nothing the first victim could have done once the rod passed that little mark. It was over in an instant.

          • Kivaari

            We are talking about those materials that pose a threat to the health and safety of people. Playing silly games regarding the minutia of radioactive materials and bomb cores in a discussion on firearms is a waste of time. None of us sane people have a practical use for having a nuclear weapon or the components sophisticated enough to make a bomb. We should be allowed anything we want. A 105mm howitzer poses no threat to anyone, as long as it is used properly. I’m not going to lay down a barrage of 105mm projectiles into city hall because I can’t own chickens in town.

          • Kivaari

            It’s expensive to go target practicing as well.

          • Lt_Scrounge

            If they had applied their chemistry skills to making explosives instead of LSD, they would’ve had more powerful explosives at lower cost. We used to use dynamite on stumps.

          • Kivaari

            We did as well. “Loggers No 2” was common. 40% ditching was common with logging road builders. Toval in plastic tube was common, but it normally would not go off with a rifle shot. Good thing, we were quite close when we tried it.

          • COL Bull-sigh

            And you wouldn’t have to worry about cross-winds and ballistics with a laser. Just point-n-shoot the water foul, deer, Low-Info-Obuma-Voter-Burgular, or the jack-booted tyrant.

          • Kivaari

            You don’t want to be downwind from the blast. That’s where the
            fallout goes. There are people called “Down winders” living east of the Hanford laboratory in Washington and Idaho impacted by releases of radioactive material into the air.

          • bmrtoyo

            aint never hadt no prop lum here

          • Simcha M.

            I never harm the soles of my feet or my shoes. I have also never harmed a soul, to my knowledge.

          • jsl55

            I harmed the sole of my shoe AND my foot when I stepped on a nail a few years ago.

          • Kivaari

            Does Plantar Fasciitis counts?

          • Sgt. Stedenko

            I’ve never harmed a sole either.
            Mackerel, tuna, grouper, bass and flounder aren’t so lucky.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            Now that is funny!

          • desertcelt

            Guess you can sleep with a clear conscience.

          • bmrtoyo

            ive hurt my share of trout ,,steelhead and bass!

          • capiers

            A nuke is not a gun it is a Bomb the last time I checked and I am almost certain bombs are illegal.

          • MichaelZWilliamson

            Incorrect. You need a license for explosives, and a completed weapon might be an NFA item. The only complication with nukes are the stringent accountability rules around fissile material.

          • Alex C.

            A nuke is considered a destructive device. In theory, one needs a DD mfg FFL and FEL 20 (Fed Explosives License). The hang-up is getting approval from Dept of Energy for the nuke material.

          • Kivaari

            The military doesn’t even own the bombs, they are on loan from the DoE.

          • Kivaari

            I don’t know what it is today, but I remember when people could buy explosives like dynamite after filling out a form like a 4473. Other places required being licensed by the department of labor and industries in Washington state. Police agencies are exempt. I was the only guy willing to be the Leroy for our bomb tech. All the young guys were gutless. They even screwed with him because he had a frag bag with some firecrackers inside of it. The new mayor ordered it to all go away. We donated all the bomb suits, armored vaults, x-ray etc to a metro department. They said it was better gear than they had. weenies live everywhere. It worked for them, they replaced the chief, and Lt. (bomb guy) and I retired a second time. Young foolish men craving power. They got the positions, but the department shrunk by 80% once the new mayor took over. They hurt good men in the process. If it sounds like I bitter, I am both those men were better than any of the young guys.

          • Kivaari

            They are “firearms” under ATF definition. The “firearms” controlled by ATF are not hat you or I would typically call firearms. They include explosive devices and incendiary devices. Under federal law we can own registered “firearms” like grenades, mines, rocket launchers and rockets, mortars and rounds etc. But it gets quite expensive to do so. Getting local police clearance can really crimp ones hobby.

          • Exscotticus

            You’re basically asking where do we draw a line—if any—on gun rights. I think a reasonable rule would be that if a weapon is trusted for use by civilian law enforcement, then its lawful use by civilians shouldn’t be an issue. Like any rule, it’s not perfect, and there are some gray areas (e.g., SWAT’s occasional use of explosives, tanks, etc.). But it certainly differentiates between the types of weapons we are likely to encounter in a civilian context versus those used in war zones. It’s a much better rule than the arbitrary nonsense that some states come up with (e.g., a fixed buttstock is OK but an adjustable one makes the weapon an assault rifle).

          • Kivaari

            SWAT teams do not use TANKs. They do not have them. They use armored cars and trucks that are very unlike a tank. People already can own tanks and artillery. We can own bombs, rockets, sawed off shotguns and rifles and full-automatic. Since ’86 we have been severely limited on what machineguns we may own at both state levels and federal. Having a machinegun collection amassed before 86, leaves you a rich person. Explosives can be owned as well. Misuse is the issue, not the weapons.

          • Exscotticus

            Tanks were used by civilian law enforcement agencies against Branch Davidians at Waco. Doesn’t matter whether it was SWAT, FBI, BATFE, etc. Point is: on rare occasions, civilian law enforcement uses hardware that is typically associated with the military. So that’s a problem for a rule that says civilians should be allowed to use anything that civilian law enforcement uses. Regardless, I still think it’s a useful and reasonable rule. Note that it works both ways. I don’t think SWAT, FBI, BATFE, etc., should be allowed to use tanks or military hardware. If there’s a situation that demands a military response, then call in the military. The proliferation of surplus military hardware to local law enforcement via the 1208/1033 Programs has resulted in the militerization of civilian law enforcement with predictably undesirable results.

          • Kivaari

            NO TANKs were used at Waco. Armored infantry vehicles with the 25mm cannons removed were used. Civilians can use the same vehicle as configured by forces in Waco. You can buy armored vehicles You can even buy a pre-86 cannon-machinegun.
            Civilian LE can use anything they want. They use armored vehicles. YOU can use an armored vehicle. You can own a tank.
            Militarization of police because they use machines that do multi-tasking is fine by me. People need to get over the whole concept of militarized and MILITARY LOOKING police. Cops suited up in protective gear, modern body armor and helmets, while carrying rifles, carbines, machineguns is fine by me. Civilian police have used more advanced firearms than the military, for a long time. A Texas Ranger in 1898 packing a Winchester M1895 in .30 US had a better rifle than the US Army issued. In 1910 even the NYPD was packing Winchester M73 carbines in .44 WCF. rapid fire repeaters.
            Often the civilian market gives stimulus to the military.
            Just what is wrong with cops wearing protection and driving an armored car, that can get to downed people needing rescue?
            I bet the cops in LA would have liked to had armored cars and AR15/M16 rifles during the North Hollywood bank robbery. Fifteen GSW victims were down, and all they had to use were Chevy Caprice patrol cars. AK and G3 fired bullet go right through those cars.
            People need to re-evaluate what they see on the TV screen and spilling out of the mouths of idiots.
            Next time Ferguson erupts, send in patrol cars while under fire. Watch the crowds of inner-city yutes turn them over and setting them on fire. Or send in vehicles that are heavy (too heavy to be turned upside down) and protect the crew. Whenever you hear a politician screaming about tanks and cops LOOKING like soldiers, I suggest you volunteer to do it in the family car while dressed for dinner. We wore the best armor we could afford. Back in the 70s we were called chicken if we wore soft boy armor. Now over 5000 cops have been saved by wearing body armor. I simply do not understand why some people think having body armor and packing an M4 carbine is somehow too military. I carried an AR180 and M1 or M2 carbine in the 70s. I carried an MP5 or M4 in the 92-2002. We were not inhibited by scared civilian officials. We could demonstrate why we did what we did.

          • Exscotticus

            Your fight is not with me but with Wikipedia…

            Assault (April 19): Hundreds of federal agents; military vehicles (with their normal weapon systems removed): 9–10 M3 Bradley infantry fighting vehicles, 4–5 M728 Combat Engineering Vehicles (CEVs) armed with CS gas, 2 M1A1 Abrams main battle tanks, 1 M88 tank retriever.

            You’re free to argue that the article is bogus, along with all the other thousands of articles when you search the Internet for “Waco siege tanks”—including the images and video of tanks (not merely APCs) at Waco.

            It sounds to me like you don’t really see (or want to see) a distinction between civilian law enforcement and the military. I think the vast overwhelming majority do see a distinction, and prefer to not get pulled over by an M1A1 main battle tank for a speeding ticket.

          • Kivaari

            First rule. Do NOT trust everything on Wikipedia. Even in the ant-government “documentaries” do not show M1A1 main battle tanks. There is absolutely no need for a tank at anything like Waco. Had they needed to punch holes in Russian tanks, an M1A1 may come in handy. If you noticed even the cannons and missile launchers on the IFVs were removed. There was nothing in Waco that would require the application of such force. If Koresh and his buddies broken out of the compound in a state of the art Russian tank, there simply was no need for heavy weapons.
            AFVs could stop any armor they may have come across, except they knew no such vehicles existed. Do you know what a disarmed AFV is? It is a nice tractor. Do you know what a combat engineering vehicle is? It’s a very powerful tractor, used to pull tanks out of the mud. None of those vehicle had any heavy weapons. Do you know what CS is? It is simply a common riot control agent that is used by police and even private persons to make people cry and cough. As a cop, I had t be hit with CN, CS and OC. In the military we all were exposed to CN. It was to show the individual soldier and/or sailor that if you are hit with CN your nose will run, your eyes leak and mild breathing discomfort. CS does the same thing, with a secondary effect. It melts the oils in your pores, and stings the nerve endings. When hit with t, don’t try to wash it off. OC is simply pepper spray. It does all of the above, and is treated with plenty of fresh water.
            Since I was in the Navy (and on the bases “civil disorders team” – riot control), Army NG (where we trained in “civil disorder control”, and anti-tank) and civilian police (where we trained for “civil disorders”). I get the picture about civil disorders. What too many people don’t get is the hazards facing police, and effective counter measures available. I am not a big fan of using SWAT excessively to serve warrants. We did it in our normal street uniform. We generally, knocked on the door.
            Get over the TANK BS, it isn’t happening. Understand that a disarmed AFV is just a tractor with armor protection. An “engineering vehicle” is a powerful tractor. That’s all. CS is simply riot control “tear smoke”. It may also be “tear liquid”, or “tear dust”.

          • desertcelt

            Machine guns fall under small arms and militia weapons. Nukes and Tomahawk missiles don’t, although I would love to have a Panzer Mk4 or King Tiger idling in my driveway.

          • supergun

            Drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes kill more people than guns. Of course they are not protected under the Constitution.

          • kbatku

            It’s not unlawful to own a machine gun, or a rocket launcher, or an anti-aircraft missile. Pass the background check, fill out the paperwork and pay the required fee and you too can be armed just like a terrorist. Of course, the terrorist just skip those steps, but you get my drift.

          • Kivaari

            It is much harder to own those devices. Federal laws allow for it, at an extra cost and paperwork. Then many states prohibit those weapons. Then in May of ’86 no new machineguns can be sold to individuals. It drove the price of an M16A1 from $500 to $20,000. I’d gladly pay a regular price for a currently made M4 carbine, but I can’t. I have owned 8 NFA weapons. In 1994 Washington outlawed them. I could not leave them to a family member if I remained in WA. I moved to Idaho, where we can have NFA guns. I still can’t afford an M16A1 or M1A1 SMG. I know where a couple really nice examples are, but the price is a bit much.

          • Lt_Scrounge

            I know the feeling. A friend who was a class III dealer had found me a nice Thompson M1 WWII rebuild but in the time that it took for my tax return to get back, the law had gone into effect and the price had jumped to the point where I couldn’t afford it.

          • Old Vet

            I hear you, since I was a teen I wanted a sub-gun like Sgt. Saunders on Combat. Can’t afford one now though. Used a grease gun in the Army, but they are so ugly and classless looking I would be almost ashamed to own one, well…..almost.

          • Kivaari

            I know where two of them are. One is an absolute mint Savage M1A1. It doesn’t get shot. The other is nice and is a plinker. I want one as well. I just can’t afford any of them.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            and that was passed during the Reagan “Freedom” years. LOL!

          • Kivaari

            If a terrorist can have one (without paper work or taxes), and federal and local police (without taxes, then I should be allowed to have them. If a person an buy a single shot .22 rifle, they qualify under federal law to own a machinegun. NO taxes or extra paperwork should be needed. Owning a machinegun or sawed off shotgun should not be restricted. Misusing them would be a crime just like any other device used unlawfully.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            10 up votes for you. I was sitting at my dinner table with a guest one day and we were having green beans my wife had picked from our garden. My guest looked over to me and said “Sammy used to love homegrown green beans”. I was choked up. Because his son, SAMMY, had died because my guest had made the grave error of cutting a shot gun off for a undercover agent working for the ATF. In the resulting confrontation his wife was shot in the head. The day he was visiting his daughter, Elishaba was there at the age of 17. She was the baby that was being held when his wife, Vicki was shot in the head. And yes, my friend is Randy Weaver who was living in Bergmann Arkansas at the time. His story is the story of Ruby Ridge Idaho.

          • Kivaari

            Remember Weaver left the barrels long enough, and the ATF is suspected of cutting more wood from the buttstock to make it under 26 inches. Weaver should have acted differently. When he showed up to court and as told it was the wrong day, he should have gone to the clerk of the court to show them the paperwork error. Then if it could not be corrected with the clerk, he should have gone to the US Marshals in the same building to clear up the issue. His stubbornness cost him dearly. The ATF and USMS really screwed from the start of the set up. Wanting him to become an informant within the Church of Jesus Christ – Christian in nearby Hayden Lake were a serious problem for the northwest. Never trust federal law enforcement. They will pounce on anyone they don’t like. It is not beyond them to fabricate evidence. If Weaver is to be believed, it was the ATF that took off too much wood. But, I’ve seen that mistake many times. The fix is to add some wood back to reach the 26 inch rule. It is a silly law.

          • COL Bull-sigh

            AMEN!!! What part of “shall not be infringed” do they not understand???

          • BryanS

            Armed like a terrorist.. nice under the radar slap there.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            If a soldier can carry, a civilian should be able to own it.

          • Tim X

            Kivaari, na, you don’t need a full auto lead launcher. We Americans should be content with semi autos, and be glad we have the right to protect ourselves. To me, gun ownership should not be about being capable of launching a major military assault against a modern army like our government has at its disposal, it is about sports and self defense. If you need a machine gun to defend yourself, you’re likely in a situation where the sh** has already hit the fan, there will be no authorities to enforce anything, and you can mod your existing semis to stay alive. Get real. Or you could always go to Kashmir, Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq, or a number of other places where machine guns are completely acceptable in civilian life.

          • El Duderino

            Well you’re entitled to your opinion, but when you look into the writings and quotes of the men who framed the Constitution, the 2nd Amendment has zero to do with sports and the simple defense of self and home. It’s as a counter to a federal/national army and a means to resist tyranny.

            The semiautomatic rifle in the 5.56mm to .308/.30-06 power range really is the last line in the sand. Most individuals don’t have the resources to feed .308 full auto for more than a quick firefight/range trip. .50 or a Mk19 or a 20mm cannon? Forget it…even though there are a few in private hands out there.

            People who think as I do won’t stand to be pushed into the “sports and self defense” corner, where we’ll have .30-30 lever actions and .380 pocket pistols as a means to counter whatever might happen down the line.

          • GreyGeek77

            Indeed! The first shots of the Revolutionary war were fired because RedCoats were marching to the warehouse where the colonists had stored a nine pound cannon, shot and powder – the equivalent to an automatic weapon or rocket launcher today – to seize them. Since the RedCoats had cannons, taking away the colonists cannons would put them at a decided disadvantage. Those who believe in the Rule of Law under the Constitution are at a decided disadvantage against the Marxist in government who are working feverishly to annul the 2A, so that only they have the firepower.

          • jsl55

            The Constitution says nothing about need. You don’t need 102 keys on your keyboard, so maybe you should have about 50 of them removed.

          • Kivaari

            The issue is we should be able to have what we want. I have suggested that our military could issue semi-automatic AR15 variants and it wouldn’t be a big thing. My issue weapon for 10 years or so, was an MP5A2. I loved having the option of FA, but I could have been quite happy with a single-fire model. We should not have to pay the feds $200 to own a semi-auto MP5 (M94) having an 8.85 inch tube. Or a semi-auto Uzi Model B, having a 10.25 inch tube. The registration and taxation is what is objectionable. I paid the taxes and Had 2 HK94, Uzi, Mini Uzi, 2 M870 and an M4 SBT or SBS. $1600 in FET and months of paperwork should not be required to own those weapons. I’m getting ready to do another SBR, and it bothers me that the extra money nda silliness with a Form 1, exists. If we have to go through that for semi-autos, they should let us buy the select-fire models.

          • Mark Are Reynolds Ⓥ

            The 2nd amendment is about “need”. It’s about RIGHTS. And we have the RIGHT to use whatever means necessary against someone trying to damage our lives, liberty or pursuit of happiness. And I bet you have 10 machine guns buried somewhere.

          • COL Bull-sigh

            You sound like a Low-Info-Obummer-Voter I used to know before he O.D.’d on Kool-Aid.

          • Wes

            I agree with you. After reading Miller v US 1938, in simple terms, if you can prove a weapon is used by a militia, they can’t charge the tax on it. It really is just that simple.

          • Kivaari

            Wes, Miller wasn’t even aware of the case, He did not have a lawyer pleading his case against the top guy, the Attorney General himself. It was a set-up where the feds could PROVE their case limiting we the people. Now the supreme court runs away from the issue. WE should be allowed to won any damn gun we want. Using the word “need” in a gun store is like swearing in church. I WANT what I want, and should not be restricted or taxed to own guns.

          • Wes

            Miller did have a lawyer. He ended up winning in the US District court in AR, but the feds appealed and he ended up dead a week prior to the case going the SCOTUS. His lawyers didn’t show up b/c they didn’t have a client. It was a setup from teh word go. The most aggregious part is that the feds continue to enforce the stamp tax despite us being able to prove that taxable weapons are used in militaries all over the world.

          • LarryNC

            Hopefully President Trump will be nicer to legal gun owners than the current resident of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Not to mention the Trump, Justice Dept.

          • Vanns40

            Don’t hold your breath. Trump has a lot of unanswered questions.

          • Kivaari

            Trumps sons have quite a few guns and are well known hunters. I personally don’t care about hunting. It is the more serious issues where we have rights.

          • Vanns40

            I don’t give a damn whether you’re interested in hunting or not, hunting has nothing to do with the Second Amendment. However, when someone says they’re in favor of background checks and extended waiting periods that DOES impact the right to self defense and 2A Rights especially when that person refuses to now answer questions regarding this statements.

          • Kivaari

            Why so hostile? I believe the other reasons for having guns far outweighs any sporting use. WE have aright to be armed to defend ourselves, others and the state. We should have any damn gun we want. If the local cops can have them, we can too. Except the states and feds severely limit us, where they should not tread. I no longer own hunting rifles or target pistols, I own serious guns.

          • Vanns40

            That’s fine and it looks as though I misunderstood the meaning of your reply.

          • Indiana Mike

            Great. Now try to convince me a Tikka 300WSM isn’t a “serious rifle”. Or that a Colt Gold Cup 1911 45 ACP isn’t a “serious pistol”. If you like your AR’s, fine, I like mine too. But don’t make the mistake of thinking other guns aren’t “serious”.

          • So does Barry and Hilly.

          • Bill

            Like how many times he’s gone bankrupt and when will he disclose his tax returns and how many undocumented aliens work for TrumpCo and what loon would run for Veep with him?

          • Kivaari

            Trump has never gone bankrupt. Three of his 200+ businesses failed. Bankruptcy is not leaving everyone hanging. It is a method of fixing things. Chapter 11 or 7 vary quite a bit. But, He has never been personally bankrupt.

          • Bill

            Of course he hasn’t- he’d shield himself from that. But don’t complain about government fiscal policy unless he’s held to the same standard.

          • Kivaari

            That is why corporations exist. To shield the executives and stock holders. If it was a sole proprietorship the persons wealth would be gone. Small LLCs exist to protect individuals. Bankruptcy is more often used to work out a way to re-organize and continue in business.

          • George Hayduke

            The million or so illegals here in CA alone, who just got Drivers Licenses will not be voting for Trump….

            Hillary has it sowed up…..

          • RICH

            If Killary gets in we are all DOOMED ! !

          • RICH

            At least Trump is Pro-Gun and not totally Anti-American like some others ! If he gets in and appoints a Real U.S. Attorney it will be a cleansing action to see heads roll ! ! All we can do at this point is to pray for what will be the best for AMERICA ! ! !

          • LetsTryLibertyAgain

            Donald Trump is NOT pro-gun! Not even close. Quite the contrary, until he decided to run for president as a Republican. Do an online search for “Trump anti-gun” and read. Don’t believe what politicians say when running for office. Look at what they have done as the best indication for what they’d do when in office.

          • LetsTryLibertyAgain

            You do realize that Donald Trump has a long history of anti-gun behavior? I’m not talking about ancient history, either. Punch “Trump anti-gun” into a search engine and you’ll quickly find:

            “Potential GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump and his daughter have reportedly donated at least $105,000 to the anti-gun Clinton Foundation, the group behind the Clinton Global Citizen Award, presented to anti-gun billionaire Michael Bloomberg by anti-gun Vice President Joe Biden, for being the “most fierce and most effective advocate that we have on the matter of gun sanity.”

          • J S

            Yup, if its on the internet, it must be true. Lemme find another roll of tinfoil for ya.

          • MichaelZWilliamson

            I don’t see how you can claim a “setup” when he was dead and had a public defender who couldn’t afford the trip to DC. Even with that, SCOTUS said (paraphrase), “If there was evidence presented that it was militarily useful, we’d find for it.”

          • Rodney Steward

            It’s called CONTROL!!

          • supergun

            Double taxation.

          • supergun

            A gun is a gun. It does not matter if it flys, swims, or walks.

          • Kivaari

            I don’t want to test that theory. We have an problem, that it takes an individual to get arrested, convicted and then appeals his way to SCOTUS. A years long effort as a convicted felon, with no assurance the high court would even hear the case, let alone rule favorably. Common sense would dictate that a person having a Mk18 M4 variant could claim it is suitable for militia use, since it is actively used.

          • Lt_Scrounge

            There’s a lawsuit going through right now concerning the ban on the production of new automatic weapons for civilian ownership.

            Considering that the one Supreme Court decision upholding the NFA of 1934 was a summary judgement that declared that the NFA only applied to weapons that weren’t in use by the military and would therefore be unsuitable for use by a militia, this could open one helluva can of worms. While the issuance of fully automatic weapons, short barreled rifles, short barreled shotguns, and suppressors was VERY limited or non existent in the 1930s military, they are all standard inventory items, especially for the more elite units. M4s are all not only selective fire, but also considered short barreled rifles because of the barrel length. Short barreled shotguns are used to breach door locks on raids and suppressors are common issue for any special operations organization. According to the reasoning behind the Wilson decision ALL of those things are afforded the protection of the Second Amendment and therefore the $200 transfer tax assigned to them is a violation of Constitution since it infringes on the rights of the people to keep and bear arms.

          • Kivaari

            My M4 is semi-auto having an 11.5 inch barrel. I don’t like the added tax and paperwork requirement. Like the 14.5 inch model, it should not cost an extra $200 to lop off 1.5 inches or 4.5 inches. If anything it makes the rifle less effective.

          • MichaelZWilliamson

            There’s actually no law against owning a nuke, though there are stringent laws around handling fissile material and the technology.

          • Kivaari

            It’s not a bomb if it has no core. It’s a display. The woman that owns Valkyrie Arms had a dummy nuke for sale. That’s a few years ago. It was on display at the Shelton Air museum.

          • DangRight

            We need uninfringed access to, at the very least, the same weaponry OUR military soldiers carry!

          • supergun

            The biggest joke is not allowing a stock on a short barrel rifle or pistol. That is the most blatant infringement against the Constitution if ever there was one.

          • RICH

            Amen, Kivaari….. no firearm is ‘exempted’ by the Second Amendment ! ! ! !

          • Indiana Mike

            The Socialist thug Dhimmicrats usually bring up that ludicrous nuke thing.

          • Kivaari

            Anti-gunners always bring that up. I contend we can have anything local police can have. They can have anything they want, short of nukes. Many machineguns are in police use. Short barreled rifles and shotguns are very common. I was issued an MP5 after
            I showed the chief my personal HK 94 SBT and Uzi. He was big on shotguns, until I re-educated him on what is wrong with them. Same with the M4 carbines. He was worried about excess penetration. I brought my personal gun along, gave more
            re-education and we ended up with M4s. The shotguns were then dedicated to less-lethal guns. We dropped buying and using buckshot and slugs. After testing bean bag loads and finding no brand could reliably hit within 12 inches of pint-of-aim at 15 yards.
            I then tested rubber baton loads, again at 15 yards on an indoor range (no wind) and found they shot to point-of-aim and made nice cloverleaf groups. Those trained on the old batons, already knew the strike chart showing where they could use them.
            Now I drifted off the route you were taking – but it boils down to we citizens should be allowed, without extra paperwork or money, have what police have.

          • Jimbo

            Right! I consider the right to bear arms as meaning anything one can carry.

          • Kivaari

            NO, it doesn’t mean that at all. It means good people that want to carry can carry. It is reasonable to deny guns to violent people having severe mental or criminal histories. NO one wants every one packing a gun. Unlike the anti-gun rights people gun owners don’t force anyone to carry a gun. But the anti-gun people want to disarm the public. Leaving only cops and military with lawfully owned guns. We see how well that works out in places like Chicago and New York as innocent bystanders get gunned down.

          • Masmani

            It doesn’t read, “The people’s right to keep and bear muskets shall not be infringed”.

          • Kivaari

            And your point is? We should be allowed to own any damn weapon we want. It should be unlawful to use them to commit crimes against persons, property or in a negligent manner. I could have a case of hand grenades stored safely and I pose no threat to any lawful person.

          • Masmani

            That’s my point, too! I agree with you 100%

        • DangRight

          No matter which “egregious” piece of legislation…
          ALL “laws” infringing upon the rights of law abiding citizens to keep and bear arms are ILLEGAL, as they are UNCONSTITUTIONAL and fly in the face of our UNALIENABLE RIGHTS!

    • Esh325

      Big gubment tyranny! How dare anybody hold firearms companies accountable!

      • mosinman

        i think what he said has more to do with the blatant hypocrisy present in the federal government , not that Stag Arms was undeserving of punishment

        • milesfortis

          Possibly, but from foreigner Esh’s previous anti-gun, anti-civil rights trolling rants, I believe you’re being overly generous to him.

          • mosinman

            oh trust me i am aware of Esh’s standpoint… i’m just trying to simplify the original comment for him

          • COL Bull-sigh

            Sounds like Eshlimann came over from Nazi-Gun-Grabbing-Germany, where only he and his Komrades were allowed to have guns.

      • Mister Thomas

        “Do as I say, Not as I do.” But you knew that already.

      • Kivaari

        Stag is suffering from a self inflicted wound. Do it right, and never let the ATF or IRS get in position to destroy you. Stag is guilty of sloppy business practices.

      • JLR84

        I’m confused. Gun control proponents keep telling me that the Lawful Commerce in Arms Act means that gun manufacturers can’t be held accountable for their wrongdoing. Have I been deceived?

        /sarcasm

    • PAUL THOMPSON

      RIGHT ON,,, Amazing how they can keep up with what someone else has and don’t have but not themselves

    • Rodney Steward

      That was planned, just like not shutting down the borders. It ‘s to let not just Mexican’s come in, but muslims are pouring across the border!!

    • Beestingza

      I’m sure they weren’t lost, as much as sold without paying taxes. I’m surprised the IRS didn’t get involved also.

      • Kivaari

        The ATF is part of the Dept of Treasury. ATF agents are the revenuers of the 20-30s, chasing down those that don’t pay taxes on guns, tobacco and booze. Now they are under the Department of Homeland Security – but they remain tax collectors. Having an illegal machinegun is having it without paying the $200 federal excise tax. That is how ATF gained its power to go after guns.

    • supergun

      Some are above the law, Mister Thomas. You can not prosecute those in this administration.

    • RICH

      HOLDER WAS PROBABLY WORKING FOR THEM…. ! ! ? ? LOL

      • Kivaari

        Holder and Obama should be sharing a cell in a Mexican prison. They purposefully smuggled guns into Mexico as a means to stimulate anti-gun laws in the USA. ATF did institute the multiple sales of rifles plan, after the ATF was exposed for being the main culprit. They have no shame.

        • RICH

          Amen ! If we get a POTUS with some balls hopefully several heads will roll. Hoping anyhow !

          • Kivaari

            There’s an article in the local paper about how weak Obama feels when he uses the gym in Hawaii while Marines are there. No kidding, he’s a woose in every aspect of his thinking.

    • Lt_Scrounge

      That’s only about half of what the ATF has lost over the last few years, and the ATF lost fully automatic ones.

  • Oh snap!

    The first AR-15 I ever fired was a Stag Model 4R and I found the quality to be very nice, to the point where I was considering getting one for myself eventually.

    As has been pointed out by others, there seems to be a fairly noteworthy disparity here. The Government can lose guns and botch operations and nobody gets so much as fired, but a company loses its ability to exist if it does something even a fraction as bad. Sad.

    • Edeco

      Yep, very sad. My AR is a Model 6. I think they do a great job.

  • tony

    The name brand of Stag Arms will remain after ownership change.

  • PK

    “Some of the firearms found at Stag also had obliterated serial numbers”

    That’s not something you can explain away. Willfully negligent or intentionally criminal, indeed.

    • Looks like the Courant added that after I wrote the article. Gotta admit, that doesn’t make Stag look good!

      • PK

        No, it certainly doesn’t look too good. No manufacturer should do that for any reason, really. Demil a receiver, sure. Just remove the serial numbers? That, to me, screams criminal behavior that was quite intentional.

        Also, your article tags are hilarious!

      • A.WChuck

        Meh, the Courant has been known to, um, allow misrepresentations about 2A subjects in their birdcage-liner of a paper.

  • LefteyeDog

    Guess i better buy some more lefty uppers and bolts before they disappear forever.

    The hypocrisy is so strong its a joke unto its self

    • bbies1973

      Coming from a fellow lefty, Stag wasn’t alone in that market. Give Rock River a look.

    • Kivaari

      Learn to shoot right handed. Except for being blind in the right eye or missing an arm, we should all learn to shoot equally well with both sides. I’m left handed but there were no left handed Garands, M1911s or S&W revolvers when I started shooting 0ver 50 years ago. When it still mattered I qualified equally well with either hand.

  • rob in katy

    I have several of their uppers and they shoot pretty well, several friends have bought their 3 gun or lefies. Shame, but you don’t mess around with Jim…ATF.

  • Squirrel

    “This company did not just manufacture small firearms. They manufactured semi-automatic weapon, machine guns, assault weapons,” Daly said.

    Ugh, that whole quote is obnoxious. Clearly the U.S. Attorneys need a subject matter expert.

    • Esh325

      Obviously the attorney may not be up on terminology, but they did break the law that’s the point.

      • NightRavenGSA

        But isn’t law all about terminology?

        • JLR84

          It sounds like the attorney was editorializing, so it doesn’t really matter whether the terminology is correct. If Stag had made the exact same violations with handgun receivers, they’d still be screwed.

          At any rate it sounds like at least one of the charges did involve a “machine gun” under Federal Law.

  • smartacus

    this company did not just manufacture small arms , but semi-automatic weapon [sic]
    no way.

    • Edeco

      Gasp! *soil pants*

    • Kivaari

      Machineguns. Don’t forget your paperwork for the machineguns.

  • TCBA_Joe

    Most “lost” firearms by manufacturers are simply improperly scraped out material.

    As for the “machine guns not registered to Stag” I’d bet they were Stag MG receivers that were not registered with the ATF in the proper amount of time. Otherwise I’d be very interested to see how they got their hands on MGs from other companies without any proper registration. (Police guns improperly traded in?)

    • Kivaari

      Stag made guns for other companies. Paperwork surrounding machineguns needs to be accurate at all times. Did the CEO instruct employees to do what they did? Or did some floor manager screw up? Being the boss and getting a felony conviction out of it, is a big price to pay for sloppy bookkeeping.

      • Bill

        The Captain is responsible for the ship.

        • Kivaari

          Yes. Sometimes the boss has trusted employees that are good at hiding their misdeeds. If we could hold the boss accountable, Obama should be a convicted felon sharing cell space with Holder.

  • Tomas Brewer

    People are trying to make this out to be “tyranny” and “big government” blah blah blah. Plain and simple- the dude was a lousy business person and an idiot. I guarantee you if an employee at Toyota lost so much as a screw he/she’d be in the hot seat. This dude over at Stag Arms clearly was incapable of maintaining an organized and efficient operation- plain and simple. This “nightmare” is entirely self made and its time he sits in the financial grave he dug himself. As a business owner I am appalled by this man’s lack of accountability and stand by his punishment 100%. Hopefully some investors will purchase Stag and inject competent management into the operation. This is shameful.

    • kbatku

      He will be far from sitting in a “financial grave” – he’ll get tens of millions for the company.

      • Tomas Brewer

        This is part of the problem with today’s society – you are exactly right.

    • Edeco

      The guy’s impressive. He started a good company, ran it for 10 years, most of that will remain. They put out good product. Obviously he’s having a bad year. It’s not a glamorous spot to be in, but let’s not lose perspective; one has to be an owner/president before one can step down as owner/president. Overall I still find him impressive and commendable.

      • Tomas Brewer

        I agree with your overall theme of expelling myopia from an analysis but I do not fully agree with complimenting the fellow as commendable. In my opinion there is nothing commendable about royally dropping the ball. I do agree however that his accomplishments are impressive and Stag is a very impressive brand only in existence due to his work.

      • Donnie

        Not sure how impressive it is to start a gun company when your dad owns a company that is one of the largest manufacturers of parts for said gun.

        • Edeco

          Doesn’t change anything to me. I mean, I’m not one to begrudge others their advantages anyway, as long as they mind their own bidness. And this is an industry with Smith, Colt and Armalite lurking in it. Whatever his background, those beasts had a head start.

    • Jon Hendry

      He’s lucky he started a gun manufacturer, and not an explosives manufacturer. Being sloppy with explosives can be hazardous to your health, not just your criminal record.

    • RickH

      Hey now!! Let’s not bring common sense to the debate!! It’s an Obama conspiracy!!!!!!!!!

  • Ryan Webb

    So this is the way the left is going to do it. “Record keeping”. Hmmm. If we held the federal government to the same standard, Obama and practically everyone working for the government would be in court or prison. Yep, everything has to be registered and tracked by the government…or else. How about all those tens of thousands of rifles, cases of ammunition, and anti tank rocket launchers dropped off accidentally to Al Qaeda and the Taliban? Oops, just the cost of doing business right?

    • kbatku

      No, that’s called “war”. What about Bush the Lesser failing to secure the ammo dumps in Iraq and letting the militants scavenge hundreds of tons of munitions?

      • Kivaari

        I wonder, did Bush tell them to do that? Or did the trusted military leaders in the battle zone drop the ball, and Bush gets blamed? There is a reason the military uses a chain of command. Bush certainly did not have knowledge of that command failure.

        • kbatku

          So, did Obama order the US generals to drop weapons to ISIS?

          • Kivaari

            He did authorize deliveries of weapons to “our Syrians”. They then spent $500 million dollars training and equipping those “good Muslims”, that were either captured, killed or defected to ISIS. Like the US selling TOW missiles to Iran, and using the profits to supply guns to the anti-Sandinistas in Nicaragua. We also supplied arms to France fighting in Indo-China, and before that we armed Uncle HO so he could fight Japanese. As well as arming Osama Bin Laden in his fight against Soviets. So we ship arms to those hat we think will do what we need being done. Sometimes those assets turn the gear on us. So, YES, Obama has armed people that want us killed. It’s happened all over the globe. Did Bush know his senior officers were going to so such a stupid thin in Iraq? We were blamed for museums being raided in Iraq. Was that our job? Did we he enough forces to protect all those bunkers? We did find close to50 metric tons of chemical weapons, that Bush is accused of fabricating. Then when we observed Iraq chemical weapons in Syria being used by both sides, should we say Bush lied about the weapons shipped from Iraq to Syria – that “didn’t exist”, when they did. How many tones of Iraqi-Syrian chemical weapons did our Italian allies destroy for us? They didn’t get it ll. So we still see Assad, ISIS and “our Muslims” using the weapons against each other. Is that what we wanted?

          • mosinman

            too bad the Contras folded without U.S support. the Sandinistas really ruined Nicaragua

          • Jon Hendry

            Syria had their own chemical weapons, they didn’t need Iraqi weapons. The chemical weapons found in Iraq were old leftovers and remnants that we pretty much already knew about.

          • Kivaari

            Tell kbatku that.

          • kbatku

            you are completely bonkers. nobody ever, not once, found ’50 metric tons” of chemical weapons in Iraq. You are either woefully misinformed or a liar.

          • Ryan Webb

            Why not ask the Iranian, Kurdish, and Shiite victims how many metric tons of chemical weapons Saddam had? Oh that’s right, you can’t. They’re dead. Did you actually serve in the military during Desert Shield or Storm or any of the follow up operations to protect the north or south of Iraq against chem and bio weapons? Do you have any personal knowledge of anything that really happened over there? I did, and do have knowledge of it. You apparently do not. I’ve already replied to one of your other posts, now as I look through your others I am seeing a trend. You seem to be really, really angry with the United States and anyone calling themselves American. That, or you’re just someone with lots of spare time and like to troll.

          • bbies1973

            Before the western world even knew that there was another half of the globe that they would eventually name “The Americas”, they were making the same mistakes. Rome played foreign policy games pitting nomadic tribes of the Caucasian and Persian regions against each other for centuries. They constantly armed the weaker tribes to fight the stronger ones, until eventually all of those “barbarian” people banded together against the great meddler. If you haven’t already come to the conclusion, yes, they did it using the training and equipment that were given to them by Rome.

            Throughout the past half of a century, when the U.S. took it upon ourselves to become the worlds’ police after WW2, we have had the capability of opening a history book and seeing that this lesson had already been learned. Yet, for whatever reason, we have chosen to ignore it in some vain attempt of believing that somehow people are no longer people, and will simply accept the “truth” that we are showing them. We preach our ideology of “democracy” across the world that we know just as Rome preached about it’s “civilization” and likewise can’t comprehend that someone wouldn’t embrace it as if it were coming from the mouth of the messiah himself.

          • Big Daddy

            I know that and you know that too bad the corporation that own our governments do not or just don’t care.

          • Jon Hendry

            No, he authorized them to give/sell/leave US weapons to Iraq. Then the Iraqis ran away when ISIS showed up, which gave ISIS the US weapons.

        • Jon Hendry

          If you’re supposedly launching a war out of concern that weapons of mass destruction might get into the hands of terrorists, one would think you’d make sure the military would keep the weapons depots under real control.

          • Kivaari

            The United States military doesn’t own nuclear weapons. Those devices belong to the civilian Department of Energy. The DOE will transfer them to the military as needed.

      • Ryan Webb

        I’ve served in the military, don’t even pretend to tell me about war. Why do you foolishly invoke the name of “Bush” when I am talking about CURRENT EVENTS, Obama, ISIS, wake up will you? I suppose when you take up in the morning and stub your toe, you probably scream “damn you Bush!” don’t you? And I pulled up a summary of all of your comments about guns and gun law enforcement too, and I am here to tell you as someone who has lots of friends in law enforcement buddy that in fact, NO, gun laws are NOT being enforced consistently…not even close. When felons try to buy guns and get popped on background checks, you think those incidents are followed all the way to their logical conclusion…at least with an investigation and hopefully an arrest? No. We have idiots in political circles who want to attack and defame law-abiding gun owners, all the while they are giving hundreds of thousands of guns to people who NEVER had a damn background check. Or does that not concern you as the outright hypocrisy that it is. And while they do that, they want to give violent criminals a pass and falsely label anyone who wants to defend themselves as lunatics or racists. Instead of hurling insults, why not take the time to actually get to know what you’re talking about before you just blast people with your dozens of comments. You sure don’t seem to have anything good to say about anyone who owns guns or supports or defends the 2nd amendment (which protects everything outlined in the Constitution and all the other rights in the Bill of Rights). And my point in my original post? Is that the government is using or threatening to use lots of illegal and unethical tricks to attack 2nd amendment rights. I wasn’t defending whatever wrongdoing was committed by STAG. But a gun company is a big fat juicy target to a gun grabber like the almighty “Obama” and all of his supporters.

    • natshare

      You mean, the same president that promised the most transparent government ever, yet won’t release his own records? Let alone records of obvious violations of the laws of this country, broken during his watch?

      Of course, he’s probably just borrowing a page from the Queen Bee herself, Hillary of the deleted e-mails. Still can’t believe she’s not sitting in a federal courthouse, making a plea, or hearing the charges a grand jury have brought her up on! The only thing dumber than a Clinton in the White House, are the idiots who will vote one of them in there!

  • John

    Play stupid games, win stupid prizes.

    This guy could have looked around for international contracts and made a fortune selling legit guns. Instead, forfeiture over what, 200 rifles? That’s not even a major city’s police force. Stupid.

  • Darrell Besser

    Why in the hell would a firearms company do business in the peoples republic of the Northeast United States.

    • kbatku

      You obviously don’t know very much about US gun manufacturing.

      • Darrell Besser

        I know plenty….but please enlighten me

        • kbatku

          Some of the largest and most respected US gun manufacturers are based in Connecticut – can you name a couple since you know so much?

          • Kivaari

            Look at those that started there. Colt, Smith and Wesson, Mossberg, Winchester, Remington, Savage, New England Firearms, Harrington and Richardson, and on and on. Just in the last few years have many of the big names started moving out of the NE. It is why Kentucky, Tennessee, South Carolina, and other states are now down south or just nearby in Pennsylvania. New England was the starting place for nearly every old name in the gun industry.

          • Just Sayin’

            Ruger to Arizona for example.

          • VT Patriot

            Marlin gone also. Plus the old favorites. such as Hi Standard, NEF and more than you can count.

    • gunsandrockets

      Be fair now. There is heck of a difference between places like Maine and places like New Jersey.

  • robert grainger

    Bare in mind that he may have sold these automatic weapons to criminals or terrorists, he didn’t lose any guns, illegal gun selling is very lucrative….if his machine guns should show up in a crime he will be facing jail for life…a fitting sentence for a dealer of death.

    • Kivaari

      It is very unlikely that his firm would supply guns to criminals ever. No one with a brain would let your company hang out like that. It is a case of poor management that could have been solved easily by doing the proper paperwork. Try to keep good records before it was all computerized. Stuff does go missing. Often from internal theft or simply a lost invoice. With the ATF you don’t have a middle ground. It is either all bad or not. I suspect there was a logical reason why the machineguns were lawful, except for the paperwork. If they were for another business, chances are Stag was subcontracted to build them and just ignored the paperwork, until such time as they were to be completed and transferred to the lawful seller.

      • Jon Hendry

        Gun stores (or at least the sleazier ones) sometimes sell to obvious straw buyers. I have no doubt an unscrupulous (or desperate) gun company (or employees thereof) would supply guns to criminals under the right circumstances.

        Maybe someone at Stag has been losing too much money at the casinos.

        • Bill

          Stranger things have happened; see the DeLorean.

    • Kivaari

      I just can’t leave this alone. Who in their right mind would knowingly sell rifles to terrorists? Besides the CIA and ATF, it isn’t what American gun makers are doing.

    • Phillip Cooper

      Wow, Why not ratchet up the rhetoric there a bit, Bob?

    • A dealer of death? Where did that come from! The report says none of the missing guns went to criminals or terrorist.

  • nastyolbstrd

    The US Government has lost all Moral Authority on this issue after the Fast and Furious debacle. Repeal the NFA, convert the BATF&E into a chain of convenience stores. While we’re at it outlaw golf and convert all golf courses to shooting ranges. Golf plus Government equals corrupt politicians, bad laws and an erosion of Freedom….. No more absurd than some of the crap the demorats come up with.

  • beenice

    Maybe the 200 lost guns are with Hillary’s emails.

    • John McMickle

      Or Lois Lerner’s email. Possibly some of the other documents that the Obama administration is refusing to turn over.

    • MrBobBarker

      “firearms not politics” – Annoying to see this voted above relevant and informative comments, especially on an article that is as vague and confusing as this.

    • M40

      Maybe Eric Holder shipped them to some cartels, and then lost track of them.

  • John McMickle

    Hopefully someone will take over the company and start manufacturing again.

  • Bal256

    This is what happens when you are a gun company and want to do business in anti gun areas. Sure, it is just as illegal to do these things in Texas, but somehow gun companies seem to get “investigated” far more frequently in places such as California or New England than in others.

    • VT Patriot

      And the local newspapers use this as a cheering point. I was in CT when this went down, and it was headlines on all the lib papers. They love it.

  • smokeybandit

    Well that explains the 3000 shootings in Chicago. Surely all the guns from this store went to Chicago.

    • Kivaari

      Manufacturer.

  • Dan McKinley

    Sounds like an unofficial government contract that wasn’t covered up well enough. No S.N.’s, unregistered automatic receivers and rifles…think some supply chain just got axed.

    • Kivaari

      CIA could have left them dangling in the wind. It is a common thread.

  • Finger on trigger?

  • kbatku

    Gun fanatics are always talking about “enforcing the laws we have” and when the government DOES enforce the laws they cry like little she girls.

    • mosinman

      obvious troll is obvious

    • “Gun fanatics”

      Thanks for saying that, it’s always nice when morons start their drivel with something obvious so I can know to stop reading early and not waste my time.

    • M40

      The feds enforced nothing but regulations here… NOT laws. Regulations are illegal acts created by unlawful bodies of non-elected officials. These agencies and their regulations operate outside of the constitutional lawmaking process, with no checks or balances, and no pesky democratic or electoral processes to hinder them.

  • Kivaari

    When this story first hit, it sounded like they had a handful of AR lowers that were not marked. I had thought, no big deal, these guys make guns for other companies and just held them as a “reserve”. Oops, it is a much bigger story. It is down right stupid for a gun business to not keep adequate records. There is really no good reason to not keep accurate records. Unless of course they were screwed over for having sanitary guns waiting a Christians In Action (CIA). Over the years I’ve seen a few of those deals go south when one arm of the feds are doing business without letting the other arm know what’s up. Interarms was in such a pickle decades ago. HY Hunter was screwed over by ATF when he imported a bunch of guns, sight unseen, from an Asian country. In the mix were 6 “9mm Beretta” guns. They were submachineguns. He was convicted, appealed and was found to be innocent. The remainder of those guns were sold to a local dealer. It was an amazing collection.
    Unfortunately for Mr. Hunter, was he was broke after spending his good money to fight a bad arrest. ATF can ruin your life over simple stuff. Don’t give them the chance. Keep good records. Having done so, saved me from a nasty situation involving a high profile shooting. Keep good records.

    • FWIW: “Hy” was short for Haywood.

      • Kivaari

        I worked for the store that bought the remnants of that deal. We were selling Colt 1911s and commanders for as little as $40. The “junk” was sold off cheap. Today they would be worth many hundreds and thousands of dollars. Guns we found like 9.4mm revolvers were $10-15. Unaltered Webley Mk4 and Mk6 in .455. Colt M1909 in .45 Colt. When I gave an old-timer $35 for a Nambu in mint condition with its holster, the boss complained. He bought them for $10 until the 1970s. Lugers and Walthers filled 55 gallon drums. Top paid for them was $15 from wars end to 1960. Times changed. We were spoiled by having so many affordable pistols.

        • Iksnilol

          Running through inflation calc gives me that 15 usd in 1945 was 200 of todays money. 15 in 1960 is 120 today.

          So Walthers and Lugers were basically the Makarovs and Tokarevs of your time. Interesting.

          • Kivaari

            That’s pretty much true. The difference was those guns were mostly bring backs from Japan and Europe. There were tons of guns dumped rom Finland. I even had a Soviet mortar 50mm that was captured by Finns. I never had a sight. Ten the GCA ’68 outlawed them. I was away in the Navy and worried about it being found and Mom sent to jail. When I came back I took it to my police department (where I worked) and put it in the evidence locker. An ATF agent came around on another case. He came back a week later and wanted to arrest me. I did get to see it on the evening news being dumped into Puget Sound. I’d like to have been around to do an amnesty registration on it. That agent transferred from ATF to another enforcement agency, then he made news. He tried to drown his wife in Lake Washington, but was caught in the act by other boaters – who saved her. He went to prison. It was Karma.

  • Lance

    Sad day. Stag was a good AR maker. CT scum strikes again.

    • Kivaari

      CT scum? This was the federal government. They would have done the same if they were in Arizona. Any gun makers remaining in New England states do so because the cost of moving is so high. The new laws since the Newtown shooting make life miserable for gun related industries. Like Magpul leaving Colorado for Wyoming and Texas. Like California businesses leaving thanks to gun control laws designed to hurt industry and citizens. The entire left coast is losing businesses to better states. California’s loss is a boost to other states. If the employees can afford to move, most of them enjoy the freedoms found outside California, MD, CT, NY, DC, MA, NJ etc.
      New England, the birthplace of the revolution has become just another dead zone for individual freedom. I no longer visit those states. If they don’t like me, I don’t like them.

      • VT Patriot

        And Rem closing down the oldest manufacturing plant in the US in Illion NY. They can not make and ship a Bushmaster out of their doors.

  • Rick5555

    Wow, this is sort of shocking. Not sure how a manufacture of Stag’s size could not keep solid recordkeeping? I actually have a Stag AR “Lefty model.” As a lefty, I’ve gotten by just fine with regular AR’s and bolt guns too. But will admit the Lefty AR was cool to have. Glad to hear that Stag will continue on and move forward. The company does produce a nice mil-spec AR. Hope many companies and individuals learn from this. Keep excellent records. So we have Sabre Defence, The dude for TV in LA. and now Stag who got shut down. The ATF needs to be disbanded and shut down.

    • KestrelBike

      At the same time, the gun community relies on the manufacturer’s strict adherence to the laws, they need to keep their noses clean and present a pristine, tax-paying, corporate image. When the rules are upheld and manufacturers don’t break the law, the gun-grabbers can’t aim at suppliers of weapons are evil-doers and open a door towards further confiscation.

      Stag makes a good product, but they got busted and need to be held accountable. This is their problem and their fault.

      • VT Patriot

        Waht about the current push to hold gun manufacturers accountable for any injuries or deaths caused by their products? So some hood-rat in Chitcago kills someone with a S&W pistol, S&W gets shut down? Sounds like a great plan to me..

    • kbatku

      ” The ATF needs to be disbanded and shut down. ” Because we don’t need any new gun laws, and we don’t need to enforce the ones we have.

      • When they uncover a terrorist cell I tend to think nope keep them around.

        • kbatku

          The irony being that whenever new gun regulations are proposed, the NRA types say “We need to enforce the laws we have” and then they want to shut down the agency charged with enforcing these laws.

          • M40

            You seem to be highly confused about the VAST difference between laws and regulations. You use these terms interchangeably… they are most definitely NOT.

            – “LAWS” are created constitutionally and are therefore legal acts. They are drafted, and voted upon by legislatures composed of democratically elected officials.

            – “REGULATIONS” are basically UNCONSTITUTIONAL “laws”. They are written by non-elected appointees… with no votes, no checks or balances, and no democratic or electoral processes to hinder their creation. There are in fact hundreds of ILLEGAL agencies writing tens of thousands of ILLEGAL regulations every year.

            HINT: Read the constitution… it’s a bit of an eye-opener. If you want to be truly aware, watch Michael Badnarik’s constitution course online. It’s well worth the time… shocking stuff!

      • Edeco

        Yep.

  • Justin Roney

    I’m sorry, but doesn’t it strike anyone else as odd that a manufacturer as big as Stag Arms would just have 62 unlicensed machine guns just lying around? Like, “oh whoops we just forgot about the 62 felonies sitting on that table” is something that seriously happens? I know the saying goes “never attribute to malice that which can be explained by stupidity,” but I’m not sure this passes the sniff test. It seems like there’s more to this story.

    • Bill

      But it’s WAY more fun to hold them as harmless victims and moan about the government.

      • Justin Roney

        I’m not necessarily saying that. But it’s not often that a company that by most accounts had the technical quality control to produce decent rifles would be so deficient on a basic tenant of the business. There had to have been 2-3 people in charge of ATF compliance, not to mention the owner having motivation to ensure his livelihood was protected. This wasn’t a fly by night operation. So you’re telling me that after Fast and Furious, Op Chokepoint, and all the other illegal things this administration has done, the possibility doesn’t at least cross your mind?

        • Bill

          No, the possibility doesn’t cross my mind, because the government screws everything up. maybe I misunderstood your example: are you alleging that some government agency might have openly approached Stag about buy illegal firearms? If so, any prelaw student could defend them on grounds of entrapment. There are enough ACTUAL law-breakers out there that the .gov doesn’t have to do that.

          Your definition of illegal may not meet the legal definition of illegal.

          • Justin Roney

            To me this smells like a government strong-arm prosecution. In other words, Mark Malwoski pissed off some government bureaucrat by not playing ball, and the ATF was sent in to “find” felonies. “Hey look at these 62 trashed receivers you have here, it looks like you were trying to manufacture machine guns and obliterated the serial numbers too. You better plead guilty and give up your company or we’ll make your life a living hell AND bankrupt you.” I don’t have any evidence of this of course, and could be totally off base, but it makes more sense than a well established FFL having such total regard for basic record keeping.

          • M40

            ABSOLUTELY. Any AR receivers pulled by QA, and not destroyed and/or recorded quickly enough as scrap and reported to ATF as destroyed could then be considered illegal arms. In fact, they also alleged that there was a batch of 100 receivers that had been made and not serialized/reported quickly enough.

            Knowing how government works, the delays were probably at the ATF end, and not at Stag’s end. But you can either spend millions of dollars (and years of your life) defending the action, or plead down and pay a fine. THIS is how federal persecution works in a nutshell.

  • Charlie McKeon Jr

    Just deserts.

    • M40

      Gobi? Sahara? I’m not sure which ‘deserts’ you’re referring to.

  • Bill

    Stop the whining – firearms companies know the rules, and if they bend or break them, there are consequences. If a food company or a pharmaceutical company played fast and loose with the law, well, in China the presidents would be executed. This isn’t the case to yowl about the wrongness of the NFA or GCA over.

    Firearms companies are like any other company, particularly those in the over-saturated AR market. Cutting corners to make a buck may be the American way, but if you get caught, expect a spanking.

    • Edeco

      Rosa Parks broke the rules too.

      • Bill

        That’s about a mile over the drama-queen line: Rosa Parks wasn’t a profit-driven company that failed to follow basic industrial laws and regulations. If your electric company “breaks the rules” by using substandard insulation and improper ground to increase their profit margin, I suppose that just means that they are American innovators trying to pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Enough hyperbole.

        • Edeco

          It’s a simple statement of fact. I don’t see why being “profit-driven” is an issue; man’s got to eat. I think bringing up electricity is overly dramatic since I don’t see proof he put anyone in danger.

          • Bill

            Neither did Rosa Parks, except herself.

            Why don’t you just say “Jesus broke the rules.” It would be FAR more dramatic.

          • M40

            I think you’re missing the point. He wasn’t being “dramatic”. He was saying that if the “rules” are WRONG, and in violation of your rights, then it’s less egregious (or even perfectly okay) when someone breaks them. I think Rosa Parks is a PERFECT example.

            Show me where in the constitution it says that the federal government has ANY business regulating, restricting or otherwise meddling with arms manufacturing. Hint… I can show you where the constitution specifically FORBIDS it.

          • Bill

            If you’re going to whip out the interstate commerce clause, no, that doesn’t apply because the .gov has a public safety and national defense interest in controlling the manufacture and distribution of certain products such as drugs, food, anti-aircraft missile systems, radioactive materials, and yes, guns, particularly those that are designed for military use.

          • M40

            The government is tasked with PROMOTING interstate commerce… not regulating it out of existence with (illegal) agencies who make up laws as they go along.
            It’s fairly specific in the constitution that no laws can be made, except by the legislature… so ALL of these regulations, codes, and other erstwhile LAWS crafted by hundreds of NON-elected federal bureaucracies… are ILLEGAL.

          • Bill

            Sigh…they are called administrative codes, and they aren’t illegal just because you don’t like some of them. Congress wouldn’t be able to take months long breaks if they had to legislate laws like the speed limit on the Blue Ridge Parkway, specifications for school bus brake pads, and how many rat turds are allowable in a hot dog. And actually study how they are drafted, there are plenty of ways of influencing them, such as public comment periods, testimony before the agency, etc….but it is more work than whining about it on the web.

          • M40

            Administrative codes aren’t legal laws just because you “feel” like they should be. Please see Article 1 Section 7 Clause 2 of the Constitution where it defines how federal laws are to be crafted.

            As for the speed limits… those are up to individual STATE legislatures (see the Tenth Amendment). There are in fact VERY specific tasks to which the federal level of government is limited. ALL other matters are reserved to the individual states.

            What we have, is the federal government shirking their responsibilities and passing them onto NON-elected, unimpeachable bureaus and agencies who abuse that power.

            For yet another example of a congressional duty that is constitutionally mandated, just look at the coining/managing of currency. This duty has been shirked and passed off to “the Fed”… yet another unaccountable, quasi-government agency who has no checks or balances, is non-elected, non-democratic, and completely ILLEGAL and unconstitutional.

            You seem to “feel” that it’s all fine and dandy, that the federal government is IGNORING those duties they are legally and constitutionally tasked with… all while meddling in a thousand things they are NOT supposed to be involved with. I don’t care if you “feel” it’s okay… when it is clearly illegal.

            The federal government is supposed to maintain the currency, protect the borders, maintain the interstate highways and rails, PROMOTE commerce, and defend the nation against foreign aggressors. All of these are DEMONSTRABLY failures of the federal government. And here we are… embroiled in pointless arguments about gun control, abortion, energy, and a million other things which the federal government has NO BUSINESS meddling in. They are usurping vast amounts of STATE power, all while shirking their mandated duties.

            But if you “feel” it’s okay, then gosh… who am I to complain?

          • Bill

            “Feel” free to violate any administrative codes you don’t like, and convince the admin law judge that they are ALL illegal. You’ll probably need to represent yourself because no lawyer not teetering on disbarment will take your case. Let us know how that works out for you.

            BTW, the Blue Ridge Parkway is a National Park, policed by the NPS. They set the speed limits regardless of which state the stretch is in, and you can contest your ticket in front of a federal Magistrate. You really don’t know how the system you are complaining about works, do you?

          • M40

            I’m not saying they don’t prosecute people and businesses that violate their feifdom’s illegal decrees. I’m just saying that it represents everything that is wrong with this country. We now live in a place where unelected people create laws by decree, levy taxation in many forms, and prosecute anyone they disagree with. If memory serves, we fought against this type of tyranny and taxation without representation just a few hundred years ago.

            PS – Pardon me for not immediately knowing where the hell you were talking about. There are towns called “Blue Ridge” in Texas, Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina, and probably a half dozen other states, as well as some in Canada.

          • Bill

            Bullpucky: they can’t prosecute someone without probable cause, not because they don’t agree with them, and it still goes in front of a judge, for that checks and balances thing. Really, take a civics class.

          • M40

            “They can’t prosecute someone without probable cause” – That’s some seriously funny material… you should write for the Tonight Show.

            Federal agencies do this to companies all the time. They drum up all manner of unsubstantiated charges. Companies are left with the untenable choice of spending YEARS in court, and millions of dollars in legal fees battling a faceless agency, (who will present false documents, “lose” pertinent records, and blatantly perjure themselves with impunity)… or… paying a huge fine (but less than what they’d spend to properly defend themselves).

            In fact, the ATF has a WELL documented history of this type of behavior. Read up on “Ruby Ridge” sometime… it’s a real eye-opener.

          • Bill

            Name 10 companies, shouldn’t be hard, the feds do it “all the time,” right? And what happened to those companies in court? Were they all not guilty?

            You mean Ruby Ridge, in 1992, your example is over 22 years old? Did you know that Weaver ignored numerous court orders to appear, and the US Marshal’s Service spent nearly a year trying to negotiate him off the mountain, where he was hiding behind his wife and kids? He was too gutless to take his fight to court and his family paid the tab for him. If you actually believe he didn’t saw off long guns while affiliated with white supremacists, that’s one case. Wow, one case, 22 plus years, sure, they do it “all the time.” That’s the best you can do?

          • M40

            Ruby Ridge is a prime example, but there are MANY more current ones. I don’t have the time or inclination to do your homework for you, but here’s a quick primer.

            Fraudulently obtained warrants naming Fox News reporter James Rosen as an ‘aider, abettor, co-conspirator’ in stealing government secrets, and resulting raid. Note that this is not the only RETALIATORY raid on a news organization by the Obama administration.

            Gibson Guitars (Republican donor) paid $300K fines after a bogus raid and resulting federal harassment.

            Mountain Pure Water Bottling Company – 50 heavily armed, hostile fed agents raided on a bogus warrant.

            Duncan Outdoors – Another paramilitary raid on a small company.

            IRS targeting/harassment of DOZENS of Tea Party and Republican Groups. Remember that fiasco?

            IRS and DOJ raids on HUNDREDS of small businesses, using strong arm tactics – Google “Rampant INjustice” for more info.

            PS – Most of what you’ve read on Ruby Ridge was the ATF’s version. They were later found to be LYING about a great many things. They murdered most of a family, and then tried to cover it up.

  • @nathaniel_f:disqus If their SOT/07 FFL is rejected aren’t they going broke b/c they cannot produce firearms anymore?

    • Jon Hendry

      They can probably get a new one after management and ownership has changed. So the sooner they can find a buyer, the better.

  • Taofledermaus

    That really sucks for the employees. Merry Christmas.

  • whskee

    Great. Anti-gun types are going to swing this around with as much glee as they can to claim gun companies are miscreant felons. Here’s an easy victory for them to point at.

    With the current anti-gun leadership in so many places, I would fully expect this to become the new shakedown tactic to run undesired companies out of business. Keeping up paperwork to register every product with the .Gov when you produce as much as a major MFR does, I’m sure is a nightmare. I highly doubt this was intentional, and they likely did have a process to prevent the mistakes. Humans become complacent. One person gets complacent and it can spread like a virus. Sometimes it’s just a new person who doesn’t know the process well. Sometimes the planets align and that inspection team shows up at that perfect time to catch it.

    I don’t recall the particulars in this one well, but the ‘Plead guilty for the best interest of the company’ part bothers me. I’d have to look it up and it’s late for me now, but I thought the original complaint had something to do with receivers which were NOT machine-guns, but were not yet finished semis either and being unserialized at their current position in manufacture for some reason. I remember the Fed took a large number from them, something like their whole current production line.

    Lastly, what justice is there for the leadership? I can’t imagine being forced to never work in my lifelong profession again. Like, wow, what do you do at that point? I get it, he can be an executive somewhere else, but firearms was this guys life and livelihood. How about the employee’s who just got screwed? I sure as hell wouldn’t continue to operate in that State if I bought them and could move the business elsewhere.

  • Stephen Slobodian

    “200 firearms were stolen or lost from Stag, although there is no evidence those firearms fell into the hands of criminals” – If someone steals 200 firearms, I think they should classify as criminals.

    • M40

      There was NO evidence that I’ve seen presented that these were EVER “firearms” at all. We’re talking about a missing block of serial numbers here.

      FACT: Gun manufacturers reserve huge blocks of unique, sequential serial numbers from the ATF. Stag’s record books were/are missing 200 numbers. This means one of two things happened:

      (A) Stag MADE them, shipped them, and subsequently lost/misplaced the file indicating where they were shipped, OR…

      (B) (more likely) Stag NEVER produced them at all. This could be a single digit error in manufacturing by those stamping the serial numbers. Skipping a block of 200 is actually a one digit error/typo by whoever made the work order, or prepped the stamping equipment for a manufacturing run of receivers.

      FACT: If you were to make a couple hundred receivers for black market sales, they would NOT be marked at all. There would be NO serial numbers reserved or missing. You’d simply machine them “off the books”. There would be NO missing block of serial numbers on the books, just less aluminum billets on the shelf.

      Add all of this up, and you have either a clerical or manufacturing error… maybe as silly as a ‘6’ that someone read as an ‘8’.

      • Nope you actually would make a couple hundred recievers for black market and then makeup the paperwork to cover the trail if an inspection occured. What they found was full autos that were recorded with the ATF and shipped out but were still there. If it had been clerical or accounting it would have been shown and they would have had been made to pay a small fine. The CEO accepting a guilty plea that makes him walk away rather then go to jail and the company be sold rather then be shut down means he talked and told who the illegal guns were sold to.

        • M40

          Either you didn’t read the article at all, or you’re seriously ignorant of how these things work. You seem to have skimmed the litany of book-keeping discrepancies found in the ATF inspection, and spun a half dozen unrelated items into a single conspiracy in your mind.
          The CEO accepting the plea, mean only that he’d rather pay a hundred thousand dollar fine and walk away, then spend the next few years (and MILLIONS of dollars) trying to battle hordes of taxpayer funded lawyers. In case you’ve been sleeping, this happens ALL THE TIME, and has become standard operating procedure for the federal government.

          • You didn’t read between the lines or listened to what occurred from ATF agents or have knowledge of past instances. What I am talking has happened several times before. They were not book keeping discrepancies here.

          • M40

            You’re correct, I did NOT “read between the lines”… that’s what you are doing. I see negligence here… not some dark criminal conspiracy.

            Rather than simply considering the evidence as presented, you’ve spun a whole movie plotline in your mind. The gaping hole in your plot is… why would anyone risk a multi-million dollar enterprise just to pocket a few thousand dollars illegally? That’s like having a winning PowerBall ticket, but trying to pass a counterfeit scratch ticket to make a few thousand more… insane.

            The article clearly states that the owner pled guilty to a single charge of possessing a machine gun that was not registered to the company (NOTE: it was not UN-registered… just not properly registered to his company). This was clearly a clerical error.

            He is also scheduled to plead to a single (misdemeanor) count of failure to maintain firearms records (also clerical errors). He’s surrendering his license and paying a fine.

            You’ve taken all of the ATF’s initial allegations as facts, rather than the actual legal outcome, which is FAR closer to the truth. So again… how about actually READING the article you’re commenting on, instead of skimming a few choice parts of it, “reading between the lines”, and then spinning it into an imaginary conspiracy?

          • Kivaari

            It becomes easy to accept what may have happened considering how many times the ATF has screwed over people in the past. I look back an remember so many “crimes” people committed, that were simply not criminal in nature. It is why manufacturers need to keep exact records. I still suspect the missing stuff was an approved sale to an OGA.

  • Iksnilol

    NOT STAG! Please, not Stag. They are the affordable legal AR-15 in Norway. Much better than the HKs and whatnot.

  • JDon357

    Record keeping error of what ? Probably less than 1% of their activity. This is only one of a series of Federal Agencies being used to attack companies which are not ‘in-line’ with the current Administration. Gibson, Boeing, etc. persecuted and extorted by the Justice Department.
    I guess this is in line with the idea of the Federal Government suing gun manufacturers if their products are used by criminals. Thank a Social Democrat today.

    • Chip01

      Hey. This is to your “let’s legalize everything” reply to me, about Pot..

      1st – You’re 9 months late to the party.

      2nd – my comment you’re replying to had 4 (FOUR) words in it… And a question mark – yet you say I say all these statements..

      3rd – pot isn’t as harmful as Nancy Reagan wished you to believe it is…
      In fact, it’s used as medicine now… To help people.
      Other than to clean out wounds in movies… What medical use does liquor have in today’s world?

      And 4th… The main point I want to make… Don’t throw up that lame cry “save the children” argument. It’s not my job to raise your kids… Raise your own kids right, and then WE ALL don’t have to do it for you though asinine Laws that have only ruin lives and cost money.

  • RickH

    “gun grabbing Obama”,…. funniest part of your post.

    • claymore

      TRUEST PART you mean?

      • RickH

        Let’s see, how many guns has he grabbed?

        • claymore

          A lot you maroon

          • RickH

            Well post up the facts there sparky. Can’t wait……

          • claymore

            Do your own research maroon.

          • RickH

            See, I have, and you can’t back up your statement, you’re just talking out of your ass…….dipshoot

          • claymore

            Right maroon post them

          • RickH

            Post what? There has been no “gun grabs”! God you are an idiot.

          • claymore

            LOL the maroon has his little tiny feelings hurt. Just because you are to stupid to understand no need to get upset little boy.

          • RickH

            Sorry to ruin your day doofus, but I never get upset from internet trolls. Maybe you need to take a break from the keyboard….

          • claymore

            Maybe you should just go away period.

          • RickH

            Awwww, still got your panties in a bunch……

          • claymore

            Sorry only you wear panties.

          • RickH

            ooooooh, nice comeback. Guess your mom didn’t get your training bra for Christmas.

          • claymore

            LOL nope that was the job of your mother. How did the fitting turn out?

          • RickH

            Ha Ha, man you are one quick wit aren’t you? Do I need to feed you any other lines? Cuz I know it’s really hard for you to come up with anything by yourself. Why don’t you go have a nice glass of eggnog and play with the toys you got.

          • claymore

            Nope none here all the toys are at your basement room in your mom’s house.

          • RickH

            Thanks for making my point! LOL!!!

          • claymore

            you made no point.

          • Ok ease it down a bit. No need for name calling. Obama might like to gun grab but he’s actually been a good salesman so far:-)

          • RickH

            Fine with me, if you notice in the posts I didn’t start the name calling.

  • ItchyTheClone

    It would not surprise me if the feds negotiated to buy the 200 weapons off the books and then bust them for it.

    • Bill

      If they did it as an undercover sting, it’s no different than a cop buying 2,000 Vicodins off the books from a drug company. If it wasn’t an undercover sting, the purchasers/agency would fall for not following procurement procedure.

      • ItchyTheClone

        True. Either way, they should have known better than that.

  • Chris

    Stag should have kept their commitment and left Connecticut when they
    passed all the state gun control acts. It was obvious then as it is now that
    Connecticut is not a friend to sportsman(s) or their business.

    It is a shame really. I liked stag products. Good rifles.

  • Brad Carlton

    I bet that wouldn’t have happened if they manufactured Solar Panels.

    • AmericanRemnant

      Maybe not, but Wilson Guitar did get the full on SWAT style raid.

      • Brad Carlton

        They do that in Broward County FL for driving on a suspended license warrant. too 🙁

  • Kevin Siegel

    The guy in the picture needs an education on trigger discipline.

  • Big Daddy

    That’s one reason I left New York City and moved to Texas. I saw what was coming and it wasn’t good.

  • Dobie Iomc

    Stag Arms. Negligency is not acceptable. Way to represent buttholes.

  • Tim X

    Seems harsh if this was a first time violation. A fine and stiff warning seems more appropriate. As Mr. Thomas pointed out, the Federal government has made far worse mistakes in putting arms into the wrong hands. Like the Iraqis, ISIS, etc. They “lose track” of thousands of weapons at a time through negligence or bad deciisions, yet no military commander or politician gets in trouble.
    And what about the SS agent who left his Sig and badge in his car?? An unlocked firearm in a locked car will get you in big trouble in California for example. I don’t think he’s going to have the same level of grief.

    • This was a company that according to rumours was involved in black market sales of full autos. Hence the plea deal because the CEO told the feds who he sold the guns to.

      • VT Patriot

        Wow, who do you know on the inside that got you that info??

      • Kivaari

        Where is that reported?

  • Tim X

    Without serial numbers, somebody could be selling those lowers out the back door by the boatloads for cash. It’s important to keep good records.

  • Just Sayin’

    re: “62 machine guns and machine gun receivers that were registered to another entity or not registered at all” Um, assuming it’s ARs they are referring to, what the heck is a machine gun receiver? It can’t be a machinegun receiver unless the lower is stuffed with an M16 trigger set. What would Stag be doing with those unless they had an FMS contract or something?

    • Stag Arms makes full auto ar-15s for law enforcement and military. What Stag Arms was either doing on the employee side or ceo side or both was having a number of the machine guns they made be sold on the black market.

    • uisconfruzed

      if you drill out for the pin over the trigger pivot pin, it’s a MG. No firing control group needed.

  • Mc Cain

    Play stupid games, win stupid prizes.

    No pity here.

  • Ken Prehart

    Lol yet no one does nothing To Hillery Clinton for loosing 6 billion of tax later money.

  • Shinypartsup

    I hope the new owners of Stag Arms moves from the “Constitution State” to a Constitutional state. If they do, I’d buy one just to support them.

    • I think you should hope the new owners would obey the law and not sell guns on the black market like Stag Arms was doing.

      • Shinypartsup

        I think you should try a reading comprehension course. The new owners will be required to have proper licensing. Nowhere in the article does it say Stag Arms was selling on the black market. They were caught not putting serial numbers on receivers fast enough to the BATFE liking, and having full auto receivers REGISTERED to another company on hand. No evidence anything was sent out the door illegally… all paperwork issues. Otherwise people would be going to jail — unless they worked for the Justice Department and gave them to Cartels. But facts mean nothing and feelings everything to the ignorant.

        • If it was just paperwork the guy wouldn’t have plead guilty to anything nor would charges have been brought. There have been other firearms manufacturers that sold full autos on the black market and no one went to jail either when they named names. The conditions of the deal was that they plead guilty to one or two charges and walked away from the firearms business forever. The company was then sold to another company.

          Why would the ATF want charges against a dealer of illegal guns when they can get all the people the guns were sold to and the network it was transported through?

          There were no registrations no paperwork showing orders for the full autos found. Guess what they also found paperwork showing a number were supposed to have been shipped but were not and when investigating they found the supposed buyers had done no such order.

          • Shinypartsup

            Try to stick to the known facts lady. Fantasies and supposition matter as little as your feelings. People with ONE illegal full auto go to prison for 10 years. This is Obama’s BATFE looking to make an example, little more. Since we are commenting on the contents of this article, please take your Ritalin and stay on topic. Or is that just too much to ask?

  • datimes

    Galil Ace pistols were approved and now are being recalled because the ATF found a “pin hole” which, in their view, makes the firearm a machine gun. I would like to read more specifics about the case. How much criminal intent is involved as opposed to technical regulatory violations.

    • Considering this guy got a plea he named names of those that Stag Arms had illegally sold guns including machine guns to. When you see numbers that are specific in a press release that means that this company was either having employees making and selling illegal machine guns as well as regular guns or the CEO was involved in selling the machine guns to the black market.

  • Rob

    Didn’t need a license anyway, as no federal gun laws are legal in the first place. We never gave them any such authority, and in fact, specifically prohibited it.

  • Lt_Scrounge

    Here’s a thought. Someone give that US Attorney a lesson on firearms. She’s obviously NOT knowledgeable about them. Semiautomatic rifles, selective fire assault rifles, AND machine guns ARE SMALL ARMS. Whether a weapon is a small arm or not is determined by the caliber of the projectile. Anything 20 mm or smaller is considered a small arm. Unless it’s black powder, flare gun or a shot gun, over 20 mm it’s no longer considered a small arm.

    • Don

      Well technically you are incorrect as well LT… The military defines small arms as — Manportable, individual, and crew-served weapon systems used mainly against personnel and lightly armored or unarmored equipment. Your definition is for “small arms ammo”. You need to make sure you word things correctly before you start taking shots at people. Just saying…

      • Don

        Oh yeah… The definition I stated above comes directly from the “Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms” amended by the DoD 2009. I couldn’t find a newer official copy.

      • Lt_Scrounge

        BTW was the US Attorney still incorrect in her statement that the weapons produced were not small arms? Yes. My assessment of her knowledge of weapons stands.

        You may not agree with my description of what amounts to small arms, but I think we can both agree that she is clueless.

        BTW I was field artillery. If it isn’t self propelled or towed, or at least 75 MM, it’s a small arm. 🙂

        • Don

          I agree. I bet you got to play with some incredible toys… Man, you lucky dog…

          • Lt_Scrounge

            Google “M270 MLRS Launcher” for an idea. I was a platoon leader when they fielded it in 1985. I actually got to fire it on one field training exercise instead of just sit on a hill and watch for safety problems. I had some rather cool pictures that have been lost over the years. I had to use a 1000 mm telephoto lens and 1600 speed film to get them. You can’t do that with a digital. I was sitting down range at the very edge of the safety fan blocking a tank trail when I took them from the hood of my jeep.

    • AmericanRemnant

      Here’s what DOJ and MSM know about firearms:

  • vet4freedom

    I own a Stag and im a left handed shooter . im wondering where im going to get parts for a left handed AR15

    • Get a better gun. There are plenty of ambi or left handed rifles better then an ar on the market for the same price or cheaper.

    • Don

      Google it, I just did and there are several other AR suppliers that carry lefty parts for AR’s including Rock River Arms.

      • vet4freedom

        thanks Don

        • Don

          Any time 🙂 Someone needs to open up an all lefties firearm store for you guys.

    • uisconfruzed

      Nothing different other than upper receiver and bolt.
      Don’t go kaboom & you’ll be fine.

  • Harold

    Busted for speaking up after Sandy Hook and standing up for Sescond Amendment rights. Plains and simple.

    • No word is Stag Arms was having employees steal guns to sell on the market or Stag Arms CEO was involved in the black market selling machine guns to criminal gangs. The reason he got such a sweet plea deal is he named names.

      • Rodney Steward

        First name IS and last IS?

      • AmericanRemnant

        You must live in Fantasy Land, did you even read the article and do you know anything at all about the business of weapons manufacturing? Marxism is a mental-illness.

      • Harold

        The B. Hussein Obama DOJ is going to let a CT based, white, male gun manufacturer off with a fine because he ratted people out even though he was complicit in selling full autos to gangs? That sounds like a stretch IMHO.

  • DangRight

    Governments around the world are the largest arms dealers– of the BIGGEST BadAss weapons too!
    Seems to me, that everything being done by STAG was CONSTITUTIONAL!

    • Don

      Then why did the owner give in so quickly and without much of a fight? There’s always more to a story…

      • DangRight

        Gov is HUGE and powerful! They have all of our money and print whatever they want. He couldn’t beat them at the game of corruption. Gov is the GOAT (Greatest Of All Time) at corruption!

        • Don

          I agree, but… This all began for this guy / company in, I believe May of 2015. Here we are still in 2015 and the case seems to be settled already, when have the Feds ever done anything this fast? What happened to his day in court? Why hasn’t the NRA jumped in to help like they normally do? There’s more to this case, MAYBE one day we will find out the entire story.

          • DangRight

            He broke “laws” which are not legal statutes via US constitution. NRA doesn’t defend against this type of “crime”. As far as I know, NRA was for NFA 1934 and GCA 1968, and does not push for law abiding citizen’s unalienable right to keep and bear arms; which is recognized by The Constitution for the United States of America.

          • PatsFan

            Bingo. I have no sympathy for him and actually thought the penalties would have been more extreme.

          • DangRight

            I’m not a Constitution Denier.
            ALL “laws” which infringe upon the rights of law abiding citizens to keep and bear arms are ILLEGAL!

          • PatsFan

            So what does this have to do with LOSING weapons and being in possession of auto weapons that weren’t listed in inventory. It’s time you replaced the tin foil wrapping your head. Nut case.

          • DangRight

            Hey Patsy,
            The govt shouldn’t be involved in registration of owners or guns. It’s none of their business who owns what guns. Only illegal activities done with them.

          • PatsFan

            What does this have to do with obvious inattention to basic rules? This isn’t happening to Knight’s, Colt, DD, etc. This isn’t a gun rights issue, it’s a f-up by Stag.

          • DangRight

            I disagree with the basic rules of gov being all up in everyone’s business.

          • M40

            Okay “nut-case”… how about actually READING the article before you post your silly opinions?

            The ATF allegation of “200 firearms stolen or lost”, was in fact a block of 200 serial numbers that was unaccounted for (and probably never manufactured). In the end, the government admitted there was no evidence that ANY arms went out the door illegally. Stag pled guilty to a misdemeanor record keeping error and paid a fine.

            The ATF allegation of unregistered auto weapons later became one weapon that was “not properly registered to the company”. See how that works? They never say it was UNregistered… just another clerical error they found. Another fine paid for a paperwork issue, but they’ve effectively shut down this company.

            Stag will now be sold off and moved out of CT… hopefully to someplace where people’s panties don’t get bunched at the mere thought of a firearm).

          • M40

            The feds do this sort of thing ALL THE TIME. The shock troops storm the place, and turn it upside down. They level all sorts of unfounded allegations, and threaten to send everyone to jail.

            Later it’s shown that there’s actually just a couple paperwork errors, and they’re offered the chance to pay a big fine to make it all go away.

            Either that, or they can spend the next 5 years (and millions of dollars) battling a horde of federal lawyers in federal courts. They’ll face an agency willing to produce counterfeit documents, claim “missing” records, and commit perjury (all with impunity).

            Or they can take the ‘deal’ and pay the fine. This is now standard operating procedure for our federal government when they want to “smack down” a particular company or industry.

  • itsmefool

    Wonder what’ll happen to Stag’s booth space next month at SHOT? Heck, with that show’s waitlist, it’s probably long gone!

  • COL Bull-sigh

    First of all, the Constitution DOES NOT give the feds oversight on the manufacturing of weapons, ONLY the interstate commerce of such items. Secondly, this is a clear case of selective prosecution, therefore a violation of the 14th Amendment, to charge Stage Arms for this and not Erik Hitler–I mean Holder–for Fast-n-Furious. We are supposed to have EQUAL protection under the law.

    • GenEarly

      If Frau Hitlery is sElected next Nov……there will be the gun/ammo sales of the century. Prudent “shoppers’ will Buy Now, especially with Obamy issuing EX Orders once done with his golfing Vaca in Hawaii.

    • Jimmy Cline

      your only argument is that someone else did it? How about EVERYONE follow the law.

      • M40

        Actually, his chief argument was that the fed has no oversight over manufacturing of arms… only interstate commerce… and even then, they are supposed to “promote” it, NOT regulate it into a rat’s maze of paperwork and persecution.

      • VT Patriot

        Hey, obozo blames everyone else for his screwups. But I guess the laws don’t apply to him.

    • AmericanRemnant

      Comparing Marxist criminal Eric ‘The Red’ Holder to Hitler disparages Hitler.

    • Kivaari

      The ATF is a tax control authority. That is why the feds got into taxation over 200 years ago. It created the reason for the Whiskey Rebellion. It is why the depression era revenuers existed. Get a license and pay taxes and it’s legal. If you get a chance visit a local brewery, where the meters recording how many liters if booze is created, and gets taxed. Just like a power meter on your house they keep track.

  • Scott

    “In the plea agreement that to the revocation” this Nathaniel F is the worst writer I have ever read in my life! Week after week, he shows us he’s never learned how to form a sentence.

  • Core

    I can’t help but feel that running after law abiding firearms manufacturers is a big old waste of tax dollars. I liked Stag Arms budget friendly rifles. I have shot them at the range and they are nice, and they were one of the first to cater to lefties. I know laws were broken, but I believe the intent and purpose needs to be established before the company should be prosecuted. The BATFE lost many firearms in Operation Fast and Furious, some of which landed in the hands of cartel and killed federal agents. (Holder wasn’t forced to resign from public service) I believe the federal leadership should question the loyalty and ethics of such behavior and ensure politics don’t drive operations. Manufacturers like Stag Arms employ Americans and pay lots of taxes. We don’t need to create an environment like Germany and disrupt firearms manufacturers due to top sided political agenda, it only weakens our economy. This type of crime fighting is a waste of tax dollars and resources when we have determined enemies and plenty of real criminals trafficking our borders.

    • Jimmy Cline

      The point is they were not a law abiding firearms manufacture. They broke the law in many cases. There are plenty of good manufactures that follow the laws.

  • Jimmy Cline

    The reality is that they broke the law. You might disagree with a law but that does not mean you can just ignore it.

    • M40

      To which “law” are you referring? Maybe you are you confusing LAWS with REGULATIONS?

      – There are LAWS, which are constitutionally drafted, passed through democratically elected and accountable legislatures, and subject to the system of checks and balances mandated by the constitution…

      – And then there are REGULATIONS, which are crafted by non-elected czars, agencies and bureaus, with no oversight, no democratic process, no accountability, no checks or balances, and no responsibility to those affected.

      Hint… one of these processes is constitutional and legal. The other is a gross violation and distortion of every principle that once made this country great. Most people know in their heart that something is seriously wrong in this country. But most people can’t quite put their finger on it. It’s a general sense that the government is unaccountable to the people… that our voices no longer matter.

      Well, I just summed up the heart of the problem in a nutshell… thousands of miniature feifdoms… ALL with power over your everyday life… ALL of them illegal… NONE of them accountable to the public… and NONE of them removable at an election booth.

    • Harold

      Jimmy have you ever driven 26 mph in a 25 mph zone? Lawbreaker!

  • uisconfruzed

    Mark, YOU’RE A MORON!!
    This is unacceptable, add to it the present regime in charge, and you’re in Connecticut!!
    You made a quality product for a good price. You may have put 100 people out of a job as your Christmas bonus.
    Moron

  • AmericanRemnant

    There are always two sides to every story. If the government is involved then it’s usually their side and the other being closer to the truth. As far as the missing weapons, was Eric Holder or anyone from DOJ or BATF known to have visited the facility prior to their disappearance? Did BATF have free reign over the place during these inspections or were they watched like hawks and have their vehicles inspected and searched prior to departure? Inquiring minds would like to know.

    • Kivaari

      They pretty much have free mobility. They will look at the log books and if there is an open line they ask to be shown were the gun is (or lower receiver). If the firm can’t show the part, then they should be able to show an invoice having the purchasers name. They will also find guns on the floor and see if they are properly tagged and logged. I’ve seen similar cases where local dealers could not account for open lines. Some of those dealers were just sloppy with paperwork. Others were selling guns to friends and told the customers we’ll do the paperwork next week, then didn’t follow up. I know of one dealer that had over 150 open lines and had no supporting documents as to where they went. A very large dealer in NW Washington had hundreds of guns missing. A family member was stealing them and selling them illegally while stealing millions. When finally caught after an ATF audit, he shot himself. People that depend on accurate paperwork to remain in business, need to do a good job. When the ATF calls for a forward trace on a gun used in a crime or simply recovered and a dealer can’t tell them who bought it, it rings a bell that more is going on.

      • AmericanRemnant

        I have heard many horror stories regarding dealers and BATF, much like what you say pertaining to maintaining proper records which is just good business sense anyway. But if they target someone they can make their life miserable whether there is justification for it or not. I have not heard of any manufacturer though being driven out of business, like this case. BATF does not have a stellar reputation for being honest and law-abiding, still waiting on public disclosure and indictments of Holder, DOJ, BATF, and DHS over ‘Fast and Furious’ as well. When a country has law-breakers acting as law-enforcers then that country has big problems.

        • M40

          Agreed… if you read the article carefully, they turned the company upside down, made a bunch of very public (but unfounded) allegations, and shut the place down. In the end when all was sorted out, they were left with 2 clerical errors;

          (A) They pled guilty to an automatic weapon that was “not properly registered to the company” (note that they didn’t say it was ‘unregistered’… so we’re dealing with inane regulatory minutia here).

          (B) they are pleading guilty to a misdemeanor paperwork/record-keeping violation.

          ALL of the other alleged violations went away. This is how the ATF and many other federal agencies operate. They’ll make a public spectacle in leveling lots of unfounded, but scary sounding criminal charges. Then they’ll dangle a huge fine for the actual minor violations (if any) to make the whole thing go away.

          You are left with the choice of spending YEARS in court and millions of dollars in legal fees battling a faceless agency, (who will present false documents, “lose” pertinent records, and blatantly perjure themselves with impunity)… or… paying a huge fine, but less than what you’d spend to properly defend yourself.

          • AmericanRemnant

            If they decide to target you, as I believe the case is here, then seeking ‘justice’ in the court system is an exercise in futility. Did you know it is now ‘lawful’ for Federal Agents to lie when testifying in court? That ‘not properly registered to the company’ weapon was probably on loan to incorporate a feature it had into a new design with the custody trail fully transparent, but as you say regulatory minutia was not adhered to, perhaps a T was not crossed. And I did see, ultimately, the guilty plea to one misdemeanor paperwork violation. All said and done, the punishment far outweighs the ‘crime’.

  • M40

    The ATF allegation of “200 firearms stolen or lost”, was in fact a block of 200 serial numbers that was unaccounted for (and likely never manufactured). In the end, the government admitted there was no evidence that ANY arms went out the door illegally. Stag pled guilty to a misdemeanor record keeping violation and paid a fine.

    But yeah… Holder actually sent machine guns to drug cartels. And they have been used to commit crimes and murders. And NOTHING happened… no prosecution… no resignation… not even a slap on the wrist.

  • AmericanRemnant

    Left unchecked or unchallenged cultural Marxism will destroy this country.

  • Are We Really Free?

    Well, another clear indication that the Constitution no longer applies. The “government” is no longer a government. It is a corporation and as such it plays in the corporate sandbox with the Uniform Commercial Code being the governing “law”, not the Law of the Land. The CEO (“president”) will do what is in the corporation’s best interest based on its agenda. It is no longer of The People. No longer for The People. And no longer by The People. Otherwise, “shall not be infringed” would mean just that. Was Stag Arms harming anyone? Were they putting firearms in the hands of terrorists or otherwise malevolent individuals? We, as The People, should not tolerate “recording keeping” to be a Federal offense or matter! How absolutely ridiculous! And what is that $600,000 in fines going for? We The People? Hell no! It goes to the politicians! And it goes to the corrupt organization of the BATFE to fund its own purchase of fully automatic firearms! How does that make any sense? It is far worse than any mafia run scenario in Chicago, New York or any other city where mobsters make the rules. Bring back the Republic!

  • Kivaari

    In the era of ink and paper record keeping it is easy to screw up records. I did it too many times. Using the same stock numbers twice or jumping a block by starting a new logbook a hundred numbers off. BUT, it can be corrected. If you catch the mistake while self-auditing your records it can be corrected.

  • “Honest, they just disappeared”…. mhm

  • Richard Kroll

    I read a lot of the threads below and want to write about the track of this story. I see this as the Feds have no idea who has all the guns (just like F and F). Terrorists like the SB twins? So we get a bad rap because this guy has “no clue” who got them. And he had a lot more at the time of the ATF inspection. Perhaps this guy was feeding those with money with automatic weapons. Read “Day of Wrath”. Maybe these guns went to the bad guns types in this book.

  • Indiana Mike

    Hmm. I guess the BATFE didn’t actually order Stag to break Federal Firearms law like they did numerous private gun shops under threat of blackmail. Interestingly, those threats were actually recorded; which is the ONLY thing that kept the gun shop owners from becoming BATFE Political Prisoners. These Feds are as crooked as a dogs hind leg. Regime thugs is all they are.

  • houlihan.k@sbcglobal.net

    Whoa, wait a minute here … General Motors hides a serious ignition design defect for 10 years while getting a $65 billion bailout in chapter 11 reorganization protection from the gov., meanwhile 123 violent crash deaths that they will admit to and many more seriously injured and maimed but no one is prosecuted or brought to court? Many millions more vehicles potentially will not be fixed in the field (25% of recalled vehicles never return), but no one is pressing the issue! Whoa, ….but several guns are misplaced by a company and is forced into a bankruptcy or liquidation?
    Where is the Justice Dept. on the auto giant GM? I want to know why the gov. is not taking action on these issues but instead wastes time on a obscure gun company?
    What is going on here?

  • J S

    Methinks the gov is looking to remove the number of dealers that sell to the public, keeping the manufactures in line. At the very least, crap like this gives the gov a recorded list of firarms buyers from Stag. Backdoor registeration, piece by piece.

  • Doug73

    Well said.

    I miss the days when Americans drove forward with optimism, rather than fear and loathing.

    I secretly wish every American had to spend two weeks in Riwanda, Iraq, Bangledesh or some of the other hell holes I’ve visited. When they returned they would realize that while all is not perfect in this country, it REALLY ain’t that bad.

    This is one of the failings of the conservative movement, too. It’s being lead by fear and anger, rather than Reagan’s brand of optimism. Obama ran on “Hope and Change” (false as that was), and won. Twice. As conservatives though we’re running on “Everything sucks! So you should be afraid!”.

    That type of negativity won’t ever result in anything good.