Australian police seize 3D printed gun from meth lab

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Police in Queensland Australia recently seized a .22lr 3D printed ‘Liberator’ pistol during a raid on a meth lab. The lovely looking nail shown in the picture functions as its firing pin when inserted.

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Despite the police having to fan themselves, this find is unimpressive compared with what DIY goodies have been previously uncovered from ‘Bikie’ meth labs.

A homemade submachine gun seized in Warnbro by WA Police

Dr Birt said New South Wales was leading the way in addressing the issue of 3D-printed weapons, having recently passed a bill around possession of 3D-printed firearms.

“There’s no stopping in terms of the technology itself,” he said.

“But through legislation you can obviously have rules associated with the printing and use of these particular firearms.

Since making illegal 3D printed guns illegal twice was such a great success, perhaps they should also consider taking steps to ensure Australia is a Plumbing Free nation.

pipeshotgunfactory72976improguns




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  • A.

    Guess the guy that published the CAD file didn’t see this coming? Uuuups, my work is waiting for the first victim.

    • lucusloc

      Not sure why it matters, unless you think he should be “held accountable”? What people do with information, with very rare and limited exceptions, is their responsibility, not the responsibility of the person disseminating it. This information was only revolutionary in process, not content, so I see no reason why it should be controlled in the slightest.

      • Thomas Weißhuhn

        But since a barkeeper is held responsible for what ever stupid thing his costomers do, so will be that guy who published these CAD files. Its Australia…

        • lucusloc

          Except that the guy who published the files is a U.S. citizen on U.S. soil, subject to our laws under the first amendment. If Australia wants to block that information they will need to get help from China to set up another great firewall. (I am going to skip all the BS with the state department over the classification of those files, they were legal when they were first published and that is the important part)

    • Joshua

      That CAD file was covered under the 1st amendment. Government can kiss my ass.

      Bad people do bad things. Guess we should ban the anarchist cookbook and mein kompf as well.

      • JumpIf NotZero

        Mein Kampf was banned in Germany up until this year… So don’t go giving them any more ideas. UK is talking about making the digital data of a 3D printed gun illegal right now.

        Banning knowledge is already a known concept.

        • Joshua

          Exactly. No book should be banned due to who wrote it or what it stands for.

          Things like this CAD file are no different than digital books like the anarchist cookbook.

          Mein kompf was just an example of what limiting speech can do that happened recently.

        • UCSPanther

          Their only hope is to make the private ownership of 3d printers illegal, just like how the Soviets outlawed the private ownership of photocopiers.

          Then again, Australia and Britain have a long history of outlawing literature and media that they don’t like. Just try openly importing a copy of that controversial game “Manhunt II” into Australia and see what happens…

        • raz-0

          It works so well, doesn’t it?

    • anon

      “1’s and 0’s are scary and we should ban them.”

      I seriously hope that you do not breed.

    • Edeco

      I’m pretty sure he saw it coming.

      • JumpIf NotZero

        Which is entirely the point. This is the genie in the bottle example. The information is out there, gun control is more-impossible-er than it was years ago.

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    I once devised (but never built) a booby trap similar to this comprised of a pipe buried vertically with a shotgun shell in the bottom set on a spring above another fitting with a firing pin. The “muzzle” would stick out of the ground an inch or so covered with leaves and when you step down on it the shell is pressed down onto the pin and you got a 12 ga ripping into the sole of your foot.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      That’s…. Not something I would EVER do… EVER admit to doing… Or EVER EVER post on the Internet about.

      Congrats because people like you that do things like that – a bigger threat to gun owners than Bloomberg could ever hope to be.

      • Joshua

        Something like this has also been used in books before.

      • JK

        Apparently, reading comprehension isn’t your strong suit.

      • JSmath

        Went a little far but you’re right about how it makes gun owners look like murder-hungry savages when people post garbage like that without any real reason.

      • Hensley Beuron Garlington

        Which, case in point, shows just how oppressive our society is becoming. What TheNotoriousIUD posted is just discussing an idea, and even if he did it, it shouldn’t be anyone’s concern. Free speech should be free speech, not what someone else deems acceptable.
        Just like its okay for you to say you think it makes us look bad, even though I think you can shove that notion and so can anyone else who is offended by it.

        Dear Lord we are losing our freedoms faster and faster. Information should be available to all, we should be able to discuss things openly and freely without lawful intervention. As long as one’s rights don’t trample another’s rights, it shouldn’t be criminalized.

      • Tassiebush

        But wouldn’t you therefore object to this whole post on the blog?

    • Sharkfinn

      Have you seen ForgottenWeapons Pancor Jackhammer video? He mentions the cylinder had some adaptor for it to be used just like that, but with multiple shells

      • TheNotoriousIUD

        Never saw it.

      • Hensley Beuron Garlington

        I missed that part of the video. That’s pretty awesome.

    • Kelly Jackson

      That’s a Viet Cong booby trap

      • TheNotoriousIUD

        Basically.

    • Nick

      They did that in Skyfall at the end.

      • TheNotoriousIUD

        I stopped watching Bond movies once he became indistinguishable from Bourne and Batman.

        • AD

          Heh, that’s a nice way of putting it.

    • Tassiebush

      I reckon we’ve all pondered that one at some stage 🙂

      • TheNotoriousIUD

        Really? And I thought I was being novel for once.

        • Tassiebush

          I actually have a theory that as gun nerds we’re all linked a bit like those blue aliens in avatar. It’s why we all seem to have convergent thoughts.

    • jerry young

      they showed a similar trap on a survivor show when a survivalist came across one with a trip wire near a moonshine operation, they’ve been around for a very long time nothing new and definitely against the law but as you stated in one of your reply’s it was just a thought and would only be used in a SHTF scenario

  • Matthew Groom

    I think they should make Methamphetamine illegal in Stralya. WHAT?! IT IS?!!! Then how did they have a LAB that makes it?

  • jerry young

    hows that no guns in Australia working? looks like the ban on guns only took them from legal owners not criminals

    • Tassiebush

      Guns aren’t exactly banned here. Unreasonably restricted but not banned.

      • UCSPanther

        I understand that Australia is known to be a bit “ban-happy” when it comes to literature and media as well.

        One famous example is the old 1928 book “Lady Chatterley’s Lover” which became very notorious around the British Commonwealth for its content.

        Australia outlawed the import of copies from 1929 to 1965. The ban on it was relaxed when someone smuggled a copy in, fired up the printing presses and churned out a large pile of them.

        Even still, Australia is notorious for swinging the ban-hammer at video games on a regular basis.

        • Tassiebush

          All true. One of the unfortunate local paradigms regardless of political persuasion 1st option is always to ban or control things. I had a paladin press book seized by customs many years ago.

      • jerry young

        I don’t really know Australias gun laws I just know of the mandatory gun turn in I read about, I’m sure there are some ways to legally own guns there but banning or restricting the law abiding from having them doesn’t stop criminals from having guns and never will

        • Tassiebush

          The basics are that semi auto long arms and pump action shotguns were banned for average sporting shooters. We have to have a licence and registration. It definitely doesn’t stop habitual or career criminals from having guns. On the one hand registration does stop you from being able to sell to unlicensed people but it also seems pretty much certain that the registry has been compromised through incompetent management and used by crims to target and rob law abiding owners.

  • Tommy

    WTF? Did these people wake up this morning and take stupid pills? Let me spell it out for you, people of Australia:
    P-R-O-F-E-S-S-O-R P-A-R-A-B-E-L-L-U-M. Read. Enjoy. Make. Shoot.

  • Tassiebush

    It’s amazing the attitude of panic in some law enforcement circles here. Within the last 12months I saw a news article about the menace of concealable knives that look like credit cards… They were talking about the swiss card knife! Talk about nervous Nellies!

    • UCSPanther

      Don’t get me started on knife laws. In Canada, switch blades (The blades that shoot straight out of the handle via a spring) and butterfly knives are banned, but there are plenty of folding knifes that can easily match the capabilities of said blades, and are perfectly legal.

      Even hand crossbows, blowguns and medieval flails (Incorrectly described in the Criminal Code as “Morning Stars”, which are actually spiked clubs) are outlawed here.

      I read the British Police had a flap with Poundland over those small retractable utility knives that you can commonly see at hardware store cashier desks.

      Goes to show that if one thought firearms were tough to control, try going after knives…

      • Tassiebush

        Those Canadian examples all sound rather familiar. I had a couple of butterfly knives as a teen but I don’t think the federal government lets them in anymore.

        • UCSPanther

          I personally think the ban on flails is especially ridiculous. The Welsh during their war with England in 1401 crafted them from grain threshing tools, which they just added spikes and iron plating to give them more of a wallop. Does that mean we should ban the old wooden grain threshing flails that were commonplace before the development of threshing machines?

          They are rather heavy and cumbersome weapons that require considerable skill to use, and if one wants to make something similar, all they just need is a length of chain, a large padlock, and voila!

          • Tassiebush

            But what about the havoc wreaked on a more or less daily basis by roving gangs of flail wielding miscreants… It seems ridiculous to ban old tools and weapons for that matter when in reality an axe is just as dangerous and cannot be banned. And as you point out bans are no obstacle to possession either.

        • Benjamin Goldstein

          Banned my good man , in QLD anyway….. And yes they are on the prohibited imports list..

          • Tassiebush

            Probably banned here too now.

  • n0truscotsman

    I’ve done worse as a kid 😉 You’re okay

  • Joshua Madoc

    Bows can also kill humans. So can hands. And practically most tools in a Bunnings. Let’s see the Turnbull government ban those.

  • LetsTryLibertyAgain

    “Last time I checked it wasn’t against the law to have an idea.”

    Check again. You obviously missed the Pre-Crime Thought Control Act of 2014. Ignorance of the law is no excuse, comrade… er, I mean citizen.

    • TheNotoriousIUD

      Im not concerned, JINZ complains about everything.