France’s RSC 1917 of World War 1 With Forgotten Weapons

rsc19171

As a history buff it’s easy to find numerous interesting tidbits by studying World War I, but what’s really fascinating is the firearms. World War I may have run its course between 1914 and 1918 but that doesn’t mean there weren’t advances in firearms technology going on. For example, the French took it upon themselves to a semi-automatic rifle for their infantry. That rifle was the Fusil Automatique Modele 1917, more commonly known as the RSC 1917, and although it didn’t see use until the tail end of the war it was a fantastic weapon.

Today the RSC 1917 is hard to come by; there are simply far more collectors than there are guns. 86,000 of the rifles were manufactured running up the halt of production in November of 1918, and today you’d be hard-pressed to find one that actually works. These rifles are gas operated, featured a rotating bolt, and chambered in 8x50mmR Lebel.

YouTuber Forgotten Weapons has covered countless historically interesting firearms, and this one is no different. I readily admit his is the first YouTube channel I typically check, because, well, history is awesome, and when you combine history and firearms? Even better. Take a look at the video below to learn a bit about World War I and France’s RSC 1917. Then hit the comments and let us know what your favorite historically relevant firearm is – aside from the 1911, guys.



katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


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  • UCSPanther

    I would say that this was the second serious attempt of a military to adopt a gas-operated semi-auto rifle.

    As for many early semi-autos, the technology was in its infancy and issues such as highly complex and intricate locking mechanisms, parts prone to flexing/breakage and accuracy flaws definitely reared their heads during this time.

  • Kip Hackman

    Phew! That article took a lot out of me! It must have taken FOREVER to research how to embed Ian’s videos in your article and write a blurb about how you like watching his videos!

  • Armchair Command’oh

    I guess not everyone can make as much of a contribution to society as you do, what with your snarky comment and all.

    • Armchair Command’oh

      This was directed to Kip

      • Kip Hackman

        Why do you feel the need to defend someone who simply embeds a video that someone else worked extremely hard to create and market on their own site, write a small blurb that brings nothing to the table, and then post it on this site as an “article”?

        Take note of articles written by Alex C and Nathaniel F, those have substance, are researched, detailed, educational and promote discussion. I’m sick of seeing people get their pay simply by sharing others hard work and bringing almost nothing to the table.

        • Chi Wai Shum

          And I am surprise to see her address Ian as “youtuber forgotten weapon”. Something similar has happened before here. Some writer here just repose Ian’s video (with basically no content of his own) and called Ian “some guy on the internet”. The situation was fairly embarrassing as Ian guest posted here before and seems to know Alex C fairly well. Steve actually wrote some sort of apology to Ian here. I am surprised it happened again.

          • Armchair Command’oh

            Oh, the drama of it all! If Alex and Ian know each other “fairly well,” don’t you think they can probably handle this on their own, without random internet commenters rushing in to save the day?

          • Kip Hackman

            im assuming you have some sort of infatuation with Katie A given your pathological need to defend her even after we’ve pointed out her painfully obvious shortcomings as a firearms writer. She doesn’t deserve to be able to post on the same platform as the other writers here who actually put the time in to write substantial & well thought out articles. You may be fine with fluff pieces like this; others are not.

        • Armchair Command’oh

          So, you’re upset that Nathan and Alex work hard but Katie doesn’t (or so you assume). The way I see it, it’s none of our business what their work relationship is.

          • Kip Hackman

            what is there to assume?! Do you not look at every other writers articles and notice the huge difference in content and quality? Good lord man, Patrick R just posted a review of the Grand Power pistol; it’s clear that he spent quite a bit of time doing work to write that article, and it shows. Pardon me for thinking it’s wrong that Katie A REPEATEDLY cross posts other people’s work, adds minimal commentary that often adds absolutely nothing to the discussion, and then gets to say “I write for the Firearms Blog!” & gets her paycheck. NO YOU DONT! You cross post other people’s stuff as if you were on facebook or writing press releases.

            She should be held to the same high bar that the majority of the other writers here have set with their thorough articles, and if she truly was, they wouldn’t allow her to CONTINUALLY post these fluff pieces.

          • Armchair Command’oh

            Do you need a hug? I’m sorry I didn’t realize you were so personally affected by her writing.

          • Kip Hackman

            Nope I’m good. I just like to see people put in the work to make their money, not ride others coat tails.