Browning Introduces X-Bolt Varmint Stalker Model

035334218 X-Bolt Varmint Stalker MOBR

Browning has added a new model to their X-Bolt Stalker series – the Varmint Stalker.  It will be available in 204 Ruger, 223 Rem., 243 Win., and 308 Win. calibers with a 24″ barrel length. The Varmit Stalker in 22-250 Rem. will feature a 26″ barrel length.  Other standard features (found on all X-Bolt rifles) include a detachable rotary magazine, adjustable “Feather Trigger”, 60° bolt lift, bolt unlock button and “Inflex Technology” recoil pad.

Adding to the extensive line of X-Bolt rifles, Browning introduces the new X-Bolt Varmint Stalker model in 2015. The new rifle will feature Mossy Oak® Brush® camouflage to hide from keen-eyed predators. The new rifle also features a heavy sporter contour barrel in non-reflective matte blued finish.

I’ve always found the idea of camo painted rifles for [varmint] hunting funny for some reason.  I get that one should break up the patterns of a weapon, and I agree it necessary for the hunting of the two-legged predators.  But do we know if it is the color pattern or the profile that is going to spook your prey?  Unless you are are managing your own concealment and also putting some ghillie on your rifle, how effective is a “mossy oak” paint scheme?  Readers?  Thoughts?

Suggested Retail: $939.99.  You can find out more information at: http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/firearms/detail.asp?fid=023B&cid=035&tid=334



Tom is a former Navy Corpsman that spent some time bumbling around the deserts of Iraq with a Marine Recon unit, kicking in tent flaps and harassing sheep. Prior to that he was a paramedic somewhere in DFW, also doing some Executive Protection work between shifts. Now that those exciting days are behind him, he has embraced his inner “Warrior Hippie” and assaults 14er in his sandals and beard, or engages in rucking adventure challenges while consuming craft beer. To fund these adventures, he writes medical software and builds websites and mobile apps. His latest venture is as one of the founders of IronSights.com; a search engine for all things gun related. He hopes that his posts will help you find solid gear that will survive whatever you can throw at it–he is known (in certain circles) for his curse…ahem, ability…to find the breaking point of anything.


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  • RocketScientist

    re the cammo… I think the general idea is that the color pattern distrupts/breaks up the profile. With the lines of the cammo pattern blending in with the lines of the background, it is harder to discern the lines that are the actual profile/shape of the gun/man/whatever. Using yarn/string or moss or leaves as in a ghille suit just takes this further.

  • Jwedel1231

    As per the camo…
    If you are going to use appropriate camouflage clothing, whatever it may be, your rifle will stick out unless it is camo also. If you don’t wear camo clothing, the rifle won’t matter. More importantly, no matter what the user wears, camo rifles sell themselves very quickly to some customers. As long as people keep buying something it will remain on the market no matter its efficacy.

  • Oldtrader3

    The issue that I have always had with the Japanese Browning’s is their high cost and low relative value compared to many other commercial hunting rifles? I have owned (3) A-Bolts and they cost too much for what they are?