Anti-UAV Defence System (AUDS)

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I’ll see your drone mounted pistol and raise you a ground based RF cannon to thwart your attack…  Obviously not intended for personal use, and not a “firearm” (I’m secretly pining away for the day when TFB covers lasers and phased plasma rifles as common platforms), but still an interesting evolution in the escalation of technology.

AUDS is designed to disrupt and neutralize Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) engaged in Hostile Airborne Surveillance and potentially Malicious Activity.

The AUDS system combines electronic scanning radar target detection & classification, Electro-Optic (EO) tracking and directional RF inhibition capability over three independent RF bands.

The system basically integrates a tracking and identification system with the ability to disrupt the communication system.  I’m not sure if this would actually affect any drones that are preprogrammed, unless it could interfere with the GPS.  I assume it would be trivial to tie this into some sort of anti-aircraft projectile (it would likely be crossing the line for defense of property–though if I start seeing pizza and amazon drones filing my sky…).

You can find more information at their website: http://www.liteye.com/auds.html



Tom is a former Navy Corpsman that spent some time bumbling around the deserts of Iraq with a Marine Recon unit, kicking in tent flaps and harassing sheep. Prior to that he was a paramedic somewhere in DFW, also doing some Executive Protection work between shifts. Now that those exciting days are behind him, he has embraced his inner “Warrior Hippie” and assaults 14er in his sandals and beard, or engages in rucking adventure challenges while consuming craft beer. To fund these adventures, he writes medical software and builds websites and mobile apps. His latest venture is as one of the founders of IronSights.com; a search engine for all things gun related. He hopes that his posts will help you find solid gear that will survive whatever you can throw at it–he is known (in certain circles) for his curse…ahem, ability…to find the breaking point of anything.


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  • Isaac Newton

    acronym inseption: an acronym inside another acronym

    • Grindstone50k

      Something the military is very adept at.

  • ostiariusalpha

    There are going to be a whole lot of people that will be very pissed off when this thing blinds whole flocks of birds.

    • lucusloc

      Did I miss something? I though this was basically just a directional EM jammer, not a laser.

  • powerwiz

    To answer the authors question…yes this will interfere greatly with a drone. The vast majority are controlled from the ground via a Ground Control Station via radio. The majority of drones used are tactical not long range.

    The biggest reason why they have been so successful is the adversary were using them against literally lives in the stone age. If a conflict was run against Russia or China say our drone advantage would be greatly reduced nor tolerated in a combat scenario.

    • Kurt Akemann

      Those nations have drones of their own and Putin’s proxies in Ukraine use their own small UAVs to recon enemy positions and provide targeting data for artillery.

      So these systems do have a use for the US and the rest of NATO.

  • Anomanom

    Perhaps you could just build a HERF weapon out of a microwave and a used satellite dish, as someone else did. Sure it won’t have auto tracking, but where’s the fun in that anyway.

  • Blake

    Oh god, you guys of all people? “Drone” is a very specific item, a UAV without human input. GPS or otherwise pre-programmed. I can’t stand seeing everyone and their mother call all multicopters ‘drones’ when the vast majority of them are not drones.

    • Southpaw89

      Thank you.

    • noob

      not yet they aren’t, but you can get bigger multicopters with gasoline motors and variable pitch rotors which can carry enough brains to become true drones. They will hopefully have uplinks for gps and control and jamming their coms might make them break off their attack.

      if they are truly autonomous and able to prosecute their targets in confined urban spaces based off onboard sensors alone we are in so much trouble that it is time to break out the hard kill systems.

    • Blake, point taken, but everything we call drones today have human input.

      The only drones that cannot take human input are some old school target drones…. but even the first target drone, where the name comes from, the DH.82 Queen Bee, was radio controlled.

      An example of a true drone (or was it a bomb with wings?) …

      • noob

        What does nicht anfassen mean? Is it a message to the recipients of the bomb?

    • Grindstone50k

      Captain Pedantic is here to save the day!

  • lucusloc

    ah, funnily enough I though about commenting on it scrambling pigeons directional senses, but it was too cumbersome to work into a short comment along with the disclaimer that this probably would not actually do that. . . pretty funny that we were actually on the same page though.

  • randy

    I wonder how a nice low tech bow and arrow with good fishing line would deal with any spinning rotors…plays h*** on weed eaters and mower blades

  • Just say’n

    I think the best they could hope for with this system it to make the RPV initiate its return- to-base function due to lost link (but at least its something). Even consumer quad-copters like the popular DJI Phantom have this ability. Of course, if it jams GPS too then that’s a different story.