New Savage 11 Scout Rifle

Scout_rifle

Savage has introduced a new scout rifle, the Model 11 in .308 Winchester.

Savage Arms fans the flames of the scout-rifle renaissance with its new Model 11 Scout Rifle. A study in versatility, the lightweight, fast-handling rifle is flush with features that deliver flawless performance in real-world situations including hunting, self-defense and law enforcement.

Chambered for 308 Win., the Model 11 Scout Rifle blends the best attributes of scout-class weaponry with legendary Savage performance to create a hard-hitting, utilitarian package that would undoubtedly make genre founder Col. Jeff Cooper proud.

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For starters, it fits the format Cooper envisioned of a compact, bolt-action rifle that is equally adept at yielding fast target acquisition and unflinching accuracy in both hunting and tactical applications. And, like any good scout, it sports reliable iron sights yet can also accommodate a forward-mounted scope.

But Savage didn’t stop there. Accuracy pushes the envelope, thanks in part to a hand-straightened, button-rifled barrel. Zero-tolerance headspace, achieved by carefully matching barrel, action and bolt, also boosts accuracy, as does a floating bolt head that self-adjusts for a fit typically reserved for hand-lapped, locking lugs.

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The 11 Scout Rifle also offers the company’s legendary, user-adjustable AccuTrigger system, which lets shooters tailor trigger pull to their personal tastes. Further fueling the rifle’s downrange exploits, Savage’s revolutionary AccuStock rail system cradles the action three-dimensionally along its entire length, while an aluminum spine molded into the polymer stock adds rigidity.

Built on the company’s time-tested Model 11 frame, the new rifle is an extremely versatile shooting platform easily customized to fit a variety of shooting styles. Sighting options include factory-issued irons, which are highlighted by an adjustable Williams receiver sight that doubles as .09-inch peep and .20-inch ghost ring, plus a .37-inch front post flanked by protective steel wings.

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The 11 Scout Rifle also accommodates standard center-mount hunting scopes for situations where mid- to long-range shots are the norm. And in a nod to scout-rifle tradition, the one-piece, cantilevered, 17-slot Picatinny rail accepts a variety of forward-mounted, long eye-relief scopes that engender fast target acquisition—which can be both godsend and lifesaver whether you’re hunting hogs in thick brush or tasked with defensive duties.

Fit is likewise easy to personalize. A spacer system in the butt pad lets you tweak length of pull to accommodate different shooting styles ranging from standard cross-body positions to squared off, tactical stances. Plus, the adjustable comb makes it easy to tailor cheek height to the shooter’s stature and various sighting options. Also, when you move that cheek piece up and down, the front and back can move independently of one another allowing you to change the angle as well.

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In a similar vein, a trio of well-placed swivel studs accepts a variety of sling options, from standard hunting straps to ching slings and 3-point configurations.

Amenities don’t end there. The 18-inch, carbon steel barrel is threaded and capped with a proprietary muzzle brake for reduced recoil. As a bonus, the brake can easily be removed and replaced by a suppressor with just a few turns of a Crescent wrench.

The 11 Scout Rifle also features a rugged synthetic stock, the flat, dark-earth tones of which are perfectly accented by the gun’s black barrel and hardware. Other notable features include a detachable 10-round magazine; reliable, easily engaged tang-mounted safety; and an oversize bolt knob that’s simple to operate, even with gloved hands.

All in, the 11 Scout Rifle weighs just 7.8 pounds, making it a lightweight knockout that serious shooters everywhere are quickly finding is as valuable on patrol or in home defense scenarios as it is afield in hunting situations.

For details about this new firearm, please visit the Savage Arm’s web site at: http://www.savagearms.com/firearms/model/11Scout.

11 Scout Technical Specifications

SKU: 22443
Caliber: 308 WIN
Handed: Right
Rate of Twist: 1 in 10″
Weight: 7.8 lbs
Overall Length: 40.5″
Barrel Length: 18″
Ammo Capacity: 10
MSRP: $794.00
Action: Bolt
Drop at Comb: Adjustable
Drop at Heel: Adjustable
Length of Pull: Adjustable
Series: Law Enforcement
Trigger: Savage Arms proprietary AccuTrigger™
Stock: Savage Arms proprietary AccuStock ™
Magazine: Detachable box
Stock material: Synthetic
Barrel material: Carbon Steel
Stock finish: Matte
Barrel finish: Matte
Stock color: Natural
Barrel color: Black
Sights: Adjustable iron sights
Special feature: Includes a one piece rail for forward-mounted scope



Phil White

Retired police officer with 30 years of service. Firearms instructor and SRU team member. I still instruct with local agencies. My daily carry pistol is the tried and true 1911. I’m the Associate Editor and moderator at TFB. I really enjoy answering readers questions and comments. We can all learn from each other about our favorite hobby!


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  • Dracon1201

    Sweet! I was hoping they would bring the scout back! I just wish it wasn’t so heavy at 8lbs.

    • Bill

      There are lots of rifles that are lighter, at 4 to 10 times the price 😉

      • Grindstone50k

        Ruger is the same price and a pound lighter. Nearly two pounds if you get the composite stock.

        • ostiariusalpha

          MSRP on the Ruger is over $1000 and it’s only half of a pound lighter for the same length of barrel.

          • Grindstone50k

            Check nearly any gun shop, it’s on the shelf for under $800. If this gun retails under $650, I will be impressed.

          • ostiariusalpha

            And your point? You don’t think this rifle will be available for under it’s MSRP ever for any particular reason?

          • Grindstone50k

            Like I said, if it retails under $650, I will be impressed. The GSR retails in that area. Either way, the GSR is not 4-10 times the price of the 11 Scout.

          • FightFireJay

            $679.99 @ Cabela’s. Compared to $899.99 – $949.99 for the Ruger.

          • Grindstone50k

            I’ve never seen a GSR retail over $800, this being across two different states. I think Cabela’s is ripping you off.

          • Dan

            Cabelas wouldn’t do that….would they? No, no no they wouldn’t….then again they do seem to sell everything at a premium…hmmm???? Those bastards!!! Seriously though I was in one and this guy was looking at a shotgun and he asks the guy behind the counter if that is the best price he can do. The clerk says yes sir that’s as low as we can possibly go. The man says well the shop down the street has it for 150 less. And the clerk said sorry sir we are bound by agreements with the manufacturer on price excluding promotions and sales. Not sure if the clerk was talking out his butt or if they do have agreements with the manufacturers. Never really really thought to check it out. Only guns i get at cabelas are the ones with my points. I live too far away to shop there so i use it at my LGS and eventually get a “free gun” but im just rambling now.

          • Some of the larger companies do have agreements that limit how low the prices can be so he was probably telling the truth.

          • Dan

            Interesting. The guy looking at the gun was being rather rude the moment he got there. I figured it was the employees way of saying beat it dude.

          • Booko Ninjiin

            I bought one for $700 including tax. Shop around.

          • ostiariusalpha

            You need to learn some reading comprehension there. Grindstone was contrasting the suggested retail price of the Savage Model 11 Scout to the sticker price of a Ruger Gunsite Scout; I pointed out the actual suggested retail of the Ruger for a more apples-to-apple comparison. The sticker price for this new Savage will drop below it’s MSRP just the same as the Ruger has. I hope this clarified what I meant for you.

          • tazman66gt

            think Impact Guns had the Savage for like $650 on their site.

        • Bill

          You are correct sir. I’ve had mine for a long time, and don’t recall currency valuation, but I’m thinking Savage has jacked their price up comparatively, and until this Savage came out I might have gone Ruger. When I got mine, the only other factory option was the Steyr. Personally, none of them seems particularly heavy to me. Any lighter in a .308 or 7-08 and people will whine about recoil.

    • iksnilol

      Get the hacksaw and dremel if you want to reduce weight further. 😉

      Or you could flute the barrel.

  • Bill

    Sorta Sweet! I’m not in a position to give up my old one, which was just devalued a bunch, and the mag doesn’t appear to be the side button style, so I’m limited to 4 zombies and one bullet for myself.

    • Tassiebush

      The old ones certainly looked awesome too. Yeah i’d feel devastatingly hamstrung only getting to shoot 4 zombies before myself. The new one with one up the spout lets you shoot 8 and save 3 for yourself to really make sure.

    • Tassiebush

      How does it handle BTW? They look nice! Do you find the scout concept as good in reality as it is on paper?

      • Bill

        It’s one of my go-to working guns, and spends a fair amount of time in the car. It handles fine, mine is plenty light for me, with a butt cuff for spare ammo and a 2x Leopold Scout Scope. As a fighting gun, the only real problem I’ve had is not being able to mount a 2-point sling on it, as opposed to a conventional sling. I could inlet the stock for a QD socket on the front, and use a webbing buttstock adapter on the back. A weaver base shimmed and woodscrewed to the stock will mount a light. I don’t think people realize the full potential of the concept

        The Mossberg MVP is on my short list also, thought the conventional scope mounts technically violate the Scout concept.

        • Tassiebush

          Sounds good. I reckon the best guns are often the ones that are convenient to have around while doing other stuff and versatile. Scout rifle seems to be all about that.
          How do you find the scout scope compared to conventional scope mounting arrangements?

          • Bill

            The Scout scope concept excels for a lot of the same reasons than some dot sights do: they minimize the chance of getting “lost” in the scope. While it definitely won’t work in the precision role. It works fine in the “if I can see it I can hit it” school of thought. It’s fast, much faster than a conventional scope, and gives you just enough magnification to extend your range, well, I don’t know how much, that will be shooter dependent. In regards to speed, a couple of us shot various Scout rifles with low power scopes in a LE carbine class, and speed to first round hit was comparable to AR’s with dot sights, and decreased as distances increased.

            I need to play with mine tonight to re-evaluate the light-gathering attributes of the Leupold ERR scope I have mounted. It doesn’t have the monster objective of some precision scopes, but is probably equal to any enhancement from a combat optic, aided by typical Leupold quality.

          • Tassiebush

            Thanks for that and the comparison with combat optics was very useful contextually. The light gathering attributes is an interesting question and I’d love to hear about how that goes. One thing I wonder about is how a low lying sun interacts with the system. In winter here it’s a bit of a nuisance at times and I ponder whether having eye at that distance from optic is an issue with that? Probably ways around it anyhow. I’ve often thought a carbine with the scout scope set up would be useful so am really grateful for your insights into this. It actually sounds like it might work on a combination gun a bit too!?

          • Bill

            Actually, the sun sets right over a pasture behind my place at this time of year, though there is a treeline maybe 400 yards off. I’ll check it out when we have clear skies.

          • Tassiebush

            That’d be really interesting to see. Looking at things towards sun or sun behind with it hitting the rear lense are the two areas of possible weakness I’m speculating might occur? Hardly a deal breaker if they are. Just interesting.

          • Bud Harton

            +1
            I was very much against the idea of a forward mounted long eye relief scope until I actually used one on hogs. Keeping both eyes open while using the scope was a little hard to adjust to but once i did running hogs at range were no problem.

  • You get so very much for what you spend!

  • Rick5555

    Not sure about the rail being so forward. As well as, would’ve been nice if Savage built in 20 MOA into the rail. Also would’ve like to see the studs at the end of the stock. So I could attach a sling and a bipod. Outside of that, seems like a nice rifle at a decent price point. Probably pick one up, after they’ve been out a while. To ensure no is having issues with the rifle.

    • Kelly Jackson

      If the rail wasn’t forward you wouldn’t be able to mount a “scout” scope.

      • MR

        Good to see they used a “peep” sight on the rear, mounted well back. I just picked up a Winchester 670, and the rear sight on that is half way up the barrel, reducing the sight radius considerably.

    • tazman66gt

      how much further down do you want the sling studs? Seem to be in the right place to me.

  • Don Ward

    Seven-fiddy is a downright reasonable price considering.

  • This is actually quite the package for the price.

  • iksnilol

    Seems like a good most-purposes rifle. Mount a conventional scope on it and it seems like a handy rifle.

    • Martin Grønsdal

      iksnilol: I see your comments here often. You are Norwegian, but from Bosnia?

      • iksnilol

        Wouldn’t consider myself Norwegian, but something like that. Live in Norway, visit the good old homeland (Bosnia) in my time off.

        • Martin Grønsdal

          skriv hei til meg på min fjesbok, OK?

  • Darkpr0

    I don’t love forward scope mounts that much… But the rest of this rifle is so nice I’m not sure I care. I’m glad to see companies still producing plain-Jane Iron sighted rifles. Call me old fashioned, but I love simple, low-profile, hard-mounted iron sights. Yeah, optics are king today, but boy is it satisfying to knock steel at a couple hundred helped only by a couple pieces of metal.

    • Bill

      The Mossberg MVP might be your cup of meat. The main reason I haven’t pulled the trigger on one, pardon the pun, is the conventional scope mounting, which defats the purpose of having an EER scope.

      • G0rdon_Fr33man

        There is a new Scout-version out 😉

        • tazman66gt

          damn, just looked at it, long rail, peep sights, can take AR or M1A mags, shorty rail for for light/laser, only thing I noticed is it doesn’t have 2 forward sling swivels but easy fix there. But are they good enough for the asking price?…

          • ostiariusalpha

            They’re rather finicky guns from what I’ve seen. The bolt has a little toggle that catches the rim of the ammo for feeding, but the toggle is gravity operated so that the gun has to be mostly level for it to work. Jostling the gun or working the bolt too quickly can cause the toggle not to drop enough and skip over the rim instead. I don’t know why they didn’t just put a spring in the toggle.

          • Bill

            I may be talking out of an orifice, but without (Mauser?) controlled round feed, I’m betting there will always be some circumstances that’ll bung up a bolt gun, but they work more often than not.

      • Darkpr0

        Receiver-mounted sights with long sight radii just give me the warm and fuzzies 🙂

  • David

    Too bad Savage CS blows chunks. Good luck if you ever have questions or issues with their rifles.

    • Honestly I never hear anything bad about Savage rifles.

      • David

        I know of two people just recently having issues with their CS. One was trying to get barrel dimensions at the muzzle of the barrel and below the rings on his rifle and they flat out refused to give it to him. The others rifle would try and feed 2-3 rounds at the same time. After much discussion with Savage they sent him a new magazine. When that didn’t work they refused to offer anymore assistance.

        • Bill

          I can’t say anything about Savage CS, because frankly in 20 years I’ve never had to contact them.

      • Dave Parks

        I have a Savage 10 FLP that would fail to eject when it was brand new. You’d pull the bolt open and the brass would extract but wouldn’t eject, it would just sit on top of the rounds in the magazine. They sent me a new extractor and that fixed it, but it still fails to feed fairly often (bolt slides over the top of rounds in the magazine without catching the rim). I never use it for anything where a rapid follow up shot is important, so I just live with it. It’s not perfect, but it shoots great groups as long as I feed it good ammo.

        • I’ve had my 10FP for almost 11 years now and it’s always been 100% reliable and accurate.

          • Dave Parks

            Every company sends out a bad sample every now and then. It happens. I’ve got a buddy who got a Remington 700 that had misaligned scope mount holes to the point where his scope (a Leupold Mark 4) didn’t have enough adjustment range to compensate.

            Despite the issues I’ve had with mine, I really like it. I wouldn’t hesitate to buy another one if I had to replace mine for some reason. In my case, their customer service took care of me on the extractor and I didn’t call them about the feeding issues because it just doesn’t bother me that much (but here I am bringing it up on the internet, so it must bother me a little).

          • True and I’ve seen or heard of a defective gun from most major companies over the years.

    • Bill

      I mentioned it in another reply, but in 20 years Ive never had to contact Savage CS, so my experience, a sample of one, has been positive.
      Savage and Mossberg don’t seem to get the respect they deserve. I don’t know if it’s gun snobbery or what, but show up at a precision rifle course with a Savage and it’s all sneers, while you’re just banging’ away. I could easily meet all my non-AR rifle and shotgun needs through both companies. I’d still love a high-end precision rifle in an exotic caliber with 5K worth of glass, but I have to think about saving up for the rest home commissary.

      • tazman66gt

        +1 on the gun snobbery

        • Dan

          + another one.

          • MR

            #allriflesmatter

            #allfirearmsmatter

          • Don Ward

            #Xcept4KelTechs
            #JamsUpWontShoot!

          • tazman66gt

            damn, guess I’m a gun snob then, I won’t spend money on a KelTec, or a High Point

          • MR

            I’m actually planning on picking up a 9mm Hi Point, just to have an example of the brand, and a point of comparison to higher priced offerings.

  • ostiariusalpha

    Wow, this is a great overall package! I’d prefer a smaller caliber like a .260 Rem or 6.5 CM; I’m not super fond of needing a muzzle brake, and those cartridges fulfill the purpose of a scout rifle perfectly.

    • Bill

      I’m not sure where you’re located, but in the States I’d lean towards .243 or .270, part of the Scout principle being that ammo should be relatively common. Outside CONUS, 7X57 might be neat, as I understand its a fantastic all-round performer and common in Europe and Africa. Then 7.62X39….

      Concur on the muzzle brake, which I would immediately replace with a flash hider, pending a possible suppressor. Brakes are a literal headache on fighting rifles, and aren’t really of any value until you get into the heavily-recoiling calibers.

      Caveat: I’m not a sporting rifle/cartridge guy, so action length and non-military calibers aren’t my thing and I’m probably wrong.

      • I know the .243 and .270 are the dominant calibers in my neck of the woods. Most start the kids out with the .243 while the adults are shooting the .270.
        Just before deer season the hunters come out to our range and sight in their rifles for the season. I’m on the range a good deal so I’ve been able to stay up with what people are using.

        • Bill

          I LOVE deer season: it’s slug only, people go into Kmart, buy a dozen boxes of slugs, and decide the day before to “sight In.: Sounds like the Battle of the Marne and the week ends with multiple dead cows.

          • tazman66gt

            just like here in Iowa

  • Southpaw89

    Is Savage going to make a lefty version or am I just going to have to go through the custom shop, of course I’ll have to resist the pull of the old milsurps before I can afford one anyways.

    • Don’t know we’ll just have to wait and see.

    • Justin

      If you want a factory scout in left hand the Ruger GSR is the only game in town right now. I’ve got one in left hand and it’s great. it’s light weight maneuverable and with the XS rail I can mount the optics wherever I want. I’ve got two scopes set up for mine, one long eye-relief leatherwood and a bushnell 10x. with my set up I can go with a scout setup for shorter range shots and if I need to reach out and touch something I can change over to the 10x. now neither of these setups are going to win an award for extreme precision but they are both well within the vitals of a deer sized animal at any range I’m likely to take a shot.

      • Southpaw89

        Yea, I like the cleaner lines of the savage, and if a lefty becomes available I’ll probably go with it, but since I’d have to special order I’m on the fence between it and the ruger.

        • tazman66gt

          Since Savage seems to have a decent lefty market I wouldn’t be surprised to see it happen, took Ruger a bit to make the lefty conversion.

  • Grindstone50k

    Ruger GSR comes in at 7.3lbs, or 6.25 with a composite stock. This one is much heavier. I don’t think it fits into the “light and handy” categories, but I’d have to actually hold one myself to be sure.

    • gunsandrockets

      I wonder how much that chunky muzzle brake on the Savage weighs? A lot of the weight difference may be there.

      In addition, one reason the Ruger GSR with the composite stock weighs so little, is the barrel is shortened to a length of 16.1 inches.

      • Grindstone50k

        16.1″ barrels are available on the laminate versions, too. The only version that’s 18″ is the stainless steel barrel.

        • gunsandrockets

          The composite stock versions with 16.1″ barrels weigh 6.25 pounds.
          The laminate stock versions with 16.1″ barrels weigh 7.1 pounds.
          The laminate stock versions with 18.7″ barrels weigh 7.3 pounds.

          The crucial point is comparing a rifle with a 16.1″ barrel without a muzzle brake to a rifle with an 18″ barrel with a muzzle brake, is an unfair comparison when complaining that the longer barreled rifle is unduly heavy.

  • Squirreltakular

    Seems a bit heavy for a scout rifle. I’d rather use my S&W M&P 10.

  • Jeff Heeszel

    Ironically, it cycles better in semi-auto mode than the Chiappa M1-9. Why did I buy that thing? 🙂

    • Southpaw89

      I’ve got one too that has had many reliability issues as well, I think I’ve found the source of the issues though, and correcting the first one is as easy as buying mags with longer feed lips, while cycling the bolt slowly by hand I found that the rounds jumped out early with the issued mags, but a used one that I picked up has longer lips and seems to guide the rounds into place better. The other issue is not so easy as the bolt hits some very stiff resistance towards the rearmost extent of its travel that may be preventing it from actually clearing the rim of the casing preventing it from picking up the next round correctly. Once I figure out a way to correct that I expect the gun to run as intended, still, its a shame that they let these flaws slip through.

  • Casey

    I wonder if this has anything to do with the Canadian Ranger’s rifle program? Looks awfully similar to the other rifles weve seen.

    • I don’t think so. At least I haven’t heard anything to indicate it being in the running.

    • Grindstone50k

      Scout Rifle concept has been around for a while. IIRC, the Rangers initially wanted the Ruger GSR, but they wanted it licensed through Colt Candida, which Ruger declined.

  • Bill

    After all the love I’ve shown this thing, that cheek rest looks like somebody folded a pice of plastic over it and screwed it on. I’m not sure it’s need for this style of rifle.

    • It can be removed. It’s a lot like many others I’ve shot. The same type on FN, and well several others.

    • Captain Obvious

      The problem is cheek weld when using a scope as opposed to the iron sights. Most people don’t understand that for good accuracy you need a good tight cheek weld without lifting your face/head off the stock. The adjustable cheek piece on this rifle addresses that issue which most stock factory rifles don’t. Bravo to Savage for coming out with this compact bolt gun.

    • Dan

      I think that is exactly what it is. I’ve never been impressed with cheek rests that cheap looking. They work but c’mon at least try a little harder.

  • Wetcoaster

    Is this a review or a repost of a Savage press release?

  • iamsalami

    I read more or less all i can find on this rifle, but cant find what type of magazine it uses?

    Hope they can take AICS, best magazine i used for the price.

    • Justin

      Considering the magazine release is in the front of the magazine I doubt they are using AICS mags. I’m hoping that the Savage Magazines are compatible with other Models, I’ve got a FLCP-K that in stock form only has a three round magazine. I’ve found bottom metal that can allow for AICS magazines but that requires stock work or a replacement stock and with the bottom bolt release there are not a lot of options for a southpaw like myself.

  • HenryV

    Lovely. Can I mount the scope properly on it? 🙂

    • A gunsmith probably could—

    • tazman66gt

      Maybe XS will make a rail for the Savage like they did for the Ruger

      • HenryV

        Ta. I bet the rear sight will unscrew to reveal a proper mounting point. My eyes couldn’t cope with a “scout” scope.

  • Joe

    Why doesn’t it take PMAG’s!!

    • Bill

      Because they would sell a boatload of them, but wouldn’t be able to sell replacement mags for a price I’m afraid to look up.

      When I become King of the World, we have standards for rails and calibers, we’ll have standards for .7.62 mags also, be it M1A, AIWC, FN or something.

      • Tom

        I believe it is an issue with the feed lips interaction with the bolt that prevents it.

        • tazman66gt

          I wonder how the bottom metal for the Rem 700’s that take the AR-15 mags that Pacific Gauge and Tool makes work.

  • Paul White

    I want this in a 260 remington or a 6.5

  • Nimrod

    Lose the muzzle break (thread protector?) cantilever the scope mount backwards for a conventional scope and add a 5 round mag for hunting and you might have some something.

    • Bill

      Yes. It’s then called a normal Savage Rifle, though I’m not sure I’d take a cantilever mount over standard rings.

  • Slim934

    Are the mags proprietary?

    • gaosmer

      Yes, the mags I bought were listed as 55184 – for 10fcp / 10flcp ( p/n 110570) my local gun shop got me one for 59.00′ Cabela had them 79.00, but see a need for a three shot mag for hunting to be legal.

      • MR

        I think around here, the mag capacity limits only apply to semi-autos. That of course varies state-to-state and amongst various jurisdictions. If it’s a limited market that requires a three shot mag, you might be stuck placing Legos or something in there, under the follower, to reduce capacity.

  • Rich Guy

    Think this could have been cooked up for the Canadian Ranger scout rifle trials a few weeks ago?

    • Wetcoaster

      Savage had a similar configuration gun a couple years ago, just with a conventional scope mount and heavy barrel without sights called the Model 10 FCP-SR.

      I’m not sure why it was discontinued though. Maybe they wanted to move to a more common magazine system?

  • gunsandrockets

    “For starters, it fits the format Cooper envisioned of a compact, bolt-action rifle that is equally adept at yielding fast target acquisition and unflinching accuracy in both hunting and tactical applications.”

    I wonder if the whole execution of the Scout Rifle concept as envisioned by Cooper is hampered because of how long ago he imagined it? Nothing comparable to the aimpoint was available back then.

    I think putting together a rifle for the same job today I would use a pump action Remington carbine in 30-06 with an aimpoint sight and 10 round magazine (and maybe a folding stock?). Low recoil loads in the tactical role all the way on up to full on 220 grain loads for bears covers the spectrum better than .308 (one study I’ve heard of recommended the 220 grain 30-06 as the minimum power rifle load for bear defense).

    • ostiariusalpha

      Even when he was alive people criticized it as conceptually obsolete. His setting up the .308 Win as one of the cornerstones of the design was a bit of an Achilles’ heel due to that cartridge’s recoil in lighter rifles. You can put a muzzle brake on like the Savage, but then you have to be mindful of the blast for anyone standing next to you or prone shooting. A suppressor is kind of expensive, though effective, medicine for this problem. More powerful intermediate cartridges like 7.62×39 weren’t common; 6.5 Grendel & 6.8 SPC didn’t even exist. 7mm-08 or .243 Win were viable alternatives that were never properly explored, probably because Cooper was as concerned about bears as yourself.
      The difficulty for using a pump action is that feeding & extraction aren’t as reliable as you can get from a turnbolt.

  • MR

    Does it take stripper clips?

    • tazman66gt

      nope, always thought that was the purpose of the forward mounted scope was the ability to feed from stripper clips

      • MR

        It’s in the main definition that I’ve always heard for a scout rifle. Detachable box mags make stripper clip compatibility somewhat less important, but proprietary DBMs reduce that advantage again, because you’re less likely to have several mags on hand. Should have gone with AICS mags, or whatever the standard is for DBMs on bolt guns. Also should have stayed true to the definition, and included stripper clip compatibility.

  • tazman66gt

    could have even used a AR type extractor, and no spring to work the pusher on the bottom of the bolt just looks like an accident waiting to happen, and like you said, it looks like if you worked the bolt with any speed or force it would ride over the cartridge.

  • Laserbait

    They pulled the Model 11 Scout from their web site. Hmmm…

    • MR

      Thanks a lot, John Doe.

  • Esdee

    Last I knew the .308 MVPs do not have the toggle, just two solid rails on the bottom of the bolt.

    • Ken

      Does the .223 MVP have the gravity operated toggle?

  • John Doe

    They’ll sell nine of these.

  • watcher45

    Does this only use Savage only proprietary magazines or can you use AR-10 and M-1A mags like the new Mossberg MVP Scout?

  • DL

    7.62x39mm. 154gr SP. Adjustable cheek piece is a NO-GO. Let’s see a gun sleeve and a suppressor. This is just another “range gun” to attract phags. Let’s see something that we can afford to use.

  • Jimmy

    Greetings from down under to our brothers in arms in the land of free & the home of the brave , Took my new model II scout for a shoot to break her in at range yesterday , ammo used 20 rounds of 5 shots of Fed 168gr HPMTK – largest group 1.1in – 3 shot groups AV groups 0.7in at 100y
    Fed power shock 20 rounds 150 SP – 5 shot group 1in at 100y
    Smallest 3 shot group 0.8 , most were hovering around 0.9 to 1inch
    Love me knew Savage