Lithgow Arms Thales F90

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Here is a new video of the Australian Lithgow Arms F90. As you can see, it is based on the Steyr design. I think the video producer/director took some cues from Instructor Zero with the spinning around and shooting balloons. I do question the lack of eye protection for the shooter.



Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • Green Hell

    What’s the deal with the “eye protection”? Was this effect of some kind of Oakley’s agressive marketing campaign in America? I can understand why you might need some kind of dust goggles/sunglasses when you are fighting in a desert or playing airsoft, but why the hell does anyone need them at range? Soldiers all over the world were successfully fighting and winning without any fancy goggles for centuries and there were never any problems until all those 80-90’s action movies started to come out and, and poisoned everyone with the “tough guy with sunglasses” stereotype. What’s next, I can’t safely shoot a gun without tactical gloves, knee pads and adult diapers anymore?

    • Major Tom

      Don’t forget the safety helmets!

    • CommonSense23

      Well one of the things we learned in Iraq was that the most preventable battlefield injury was to the eyes. For the shear amount of ease it is to put on a simple pair of glasses, the payoff is huge if you need them. Are you going to complain next about how soldiers shot for centuries without hearing protection, and we are being babies cause we don’t want to have significant hearing loss when we are older cause we stress hearing protection.

      • Bill

        I’ll have to find the figure, but something like 80% of all battlefield injuries were related to soldiers’ eyes. It may have been something relatively minor like dust, or relatively major, like enucleation due to an IED or RPG, but when eyepro was mandated ocular injuries plummeted.

        No one sets foot on my range without eye- and ear pro. I STRONGLY recommend it to all the guys on patrol, any shift, in case of crashes, foot pursuits that end up in the stickers, spitters, OC and TASER deployment, etc. Ironically, I also push the day shift guys to take their shades off during low-key contacts, so that they can make eye contact with whomever they are talking to and not look like Arnold in The Terminator.

        …and that rifle gives me a funny feeling below my tummy.

      • Tom

        Basically this!

    • Nicholas Chen

      Eye protection is like seat belts in cars. I don’t plan on crashing. But if I did I’d be glad to have it on. Same with wearing eye protection. No you don’t need them. But don’t complain when something goes wrong and you hurt your eyes.

    • Kriegs Bemarlon

      When I first started Shooting on a well maintained indoor range i was lightly hit in the chest by some .22 shrapnel from 25m.
      If something like that can happen in such a controlled Environment then it is probably a really good idea to have it in any other Environment.

    • Sadler

      I don’t know, man, my ear pro has a bunch of impact marks from pieces of lead and steel hitting them.

    • TheNotoriousIUD

      I used to think that shooting a suppressed SBR out in the country without eyes and ears was the best you could get until a can malfunctioned and a bullet came out the side of it. Now I wear eye protection.

    • BrandonAKsALot

      After witnessing first hand a Talon pistol explode and the back half of the slide launched into my buddy’s face, I am very happy to put on my eye protection. His Oakley’s likely saved his eye along with preventing some stitches. Still plenty of blood that day though.

    • Ebby321

      +1 to what everyone below is saying. I never saw the value in eye protection either, and frequently protested having to wear it…. until I saw my buddy’s eyebrow get split open by a piece of jacket that ricocheted. If he hadn’t been wearing glasses then he’d almost certainly be wearing an eye-patch now.

    • Bal256

      While we’re sharing stories… shot an SKS once where the dust cover pin was loosening up without me noticing. At some point it was loose enough that when the bolt travelled back it threw the dust cover into my face. My face was bleeding but my eyes were saved by eye pro that day

    • tb556

      When I was in my early twenties I had a steel fragment get blown back out through the dust cover hole of my SAR-1 and embed into my eye. It was very small and I had to have an ophthalmologist use tweezers to get it out. Fortunately no permanent scaring on my cornea, probably because I had it taken care of the very next day. It was a freak accident but I would still recommend wearing eye protection.

    • Rick5555

      It’s all fun and games. Until someone loses an eye…”me eye, me eye.” Sorry, I couldn’t resist.

      • Tassiebush

        “I double dog dare you”

        • Veloxto

          Not sure what is funny or wrong with either of those phrases :/

          • Tassiebush

            References to A Christmas Story film.

          • MRHapla

            You’re not from around here, are ya pard?

          • Veloxto

            I actually am from (and currently presiding in) Australia. I have never seen A Christmas Story (or I have and ive forgotten about it). That and foreigners often find Australian vernacular rather amusing.

          • MRHapla

            Indeed,,,,,It is worth a viewing, trust me on this.

    • schizuki

      Wow. Just… wow.

      “When I was a boy, out-of-battery discharges blew gas and brass in our eyes and we LIKED it!”

      • jcitizen

        Kids are crazy that way; I was too – but I had prescription glasses and could afford to be merry! HA!

    • MRHapla

      You’re making a spectacle of yourself.

    • Core

      The amount of weapons training and exposure while deployed has impacted my vision. Even while wearing eye protection and ear protection. I don’t think it’s machismo to be deaf and blind. I’m lucky to have the vision and hearing I have after everything I’ve been exposed to even with the protection. You have to be open to adapt to new practices when we learn from the err of our past.

    • Kivaari

      Eye protection is and has been recommended for all shooters for at least 60 years. Getting blasted by gases and brass from a failed cartridge hurts. Everywhere stuff gets airborne and can hit the eyes, needs protection. Why not use glasses, knee pads and other protective wear when engaged in similar work or play. You don’t see many carpenters without glasses and gloves. Even surgeons and nurses in a sterile operating room find gloves and eye protection good things to have.
      Go build a birdhouse without eye wear, using your table saw.

  • Vitor Roma

    So, it seems that the barrel can still be quickly changed, but not solely the barrel like the traditional aug.

    • Yallan

      Kinda an improvement as then you don’t need to zero. Switch from your CQB upper to a DMR upper.

  • Henry Leaver

    The F90 export version will have the option to use STANAG, I think Australia will stick with Aug ones because it will be cheaper. I have no doubt Lithgow will sell these to the US market for civilians.

    • J.T.

      Wouldn’t that require getting export approval from a government that thinks civilians shouldn’t be allowed to own semi-automatic rifles? They would also have to set up some manufacturing in the US for 922r compliance if they did manage to get approval.

      • Tassiebush

        I honestly don’t think they’d have trouble exporting them unless it became a hot political issue. If it wasn’t made a fuss of by domestic antis then at least somewhere in the world someone would get to have some fun with them.

  • Riot

    1.14 is a tiny brass deflector so much to ask?

    • Henry Leaver

      On the list of changes for the ADF was a brass deflector however this video predates that announcement. there were some other slight changes and a few more important ones like a folding charging handle and a black scheme for the army’s rifle instead of the previous 2 tone vomit one

      • Yallan

        Actually if you look very closely there is a deflector already there, it’s just recessed. Notice the casings come out to the side and not back like the old Steyr Aug.

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    That is one cool looking rifle.
    I needs one.

    • Seburo

      I needs one too. Though I wonder which will come out first. The civie F90 or civie MDR.

      • TheNotoriousIUD

        I don’t know but I suspect I wont be able to afford either one.
        Feeding my current 5.56 is pricey enough.

      • jay

        It’s made in Australia. With the full retards hipsters running that country, I doubt you’ll ever see a civie version.

        • Seburo

          Thales Group ownership is still based in France though.

      • SD

        Lithgow will never sell to the US civilian market.

    • Lee

      Bloody oath.

  • Seburo

    Steyr must be banging their heads against the table after loosing the patent on their own gun. If not they should be.

    • Steyr undoubtedly thought that they were well-compensated when they first licensed the production rights to the Australians Any AUG patents have long run out since then.

      • Giolli Joker

        It’s all a ploy to have more people confusing Austria and Australia.

  • Bill

    Too many of these ads are high on drama, and basically demonstrate the shooter’s skill and little about the rifle. Leave the rifle overnight in a mud puddle at 32 degrees F and then have a basic trainee shoot it.

    BTW, I’ll sell a kidney to get one – the ad worked.

  • Lance

    No back up sights?? Bad idea.

  • Roy Harden

    Lack of eye protection? No, I’m sure he has contacts. Lol.

  • Rick5555

    Per Lithgow Arms website. This P90 weighs roughly 7 lbs. (16″ barrel) . It’s lighter than a Tavor. And better looking too. Was never a bullpup fan, however my Tavor has grown on me. I definitely would pick one of these up…if the company makes them available for the commercial market. Wouldn’t be hard for them to get established in America. Just do what IWI did. Create a company here, ship components and parts to America and assemble here. Just call the company Lithgow Arms USA or America. And they’re in business.

  • Veloxto

    Yeah, most other countries aren’t as stringent with protocol and safety as the US is. Especially in non-combat/duty scenarios such as this.

    • Yallan

      No eye protection -2 operator level.

  • Walter

    Prevention is better than cure! … this is not commercial spot!

  • Mark Hillard

    I’m impressed, eye protection is a personal choice.

  • Mark H

    I’m impressed, eye protection is a personal choice. Looks like my SKS BULLPUP

  • Cm

    really liked that left shoulder shooting. being a lefty i’d love catching hot brass between my teeth. what is the problem w/ designers/engineers not starting any firearm especially bullpups to be fully ambidextrous? you automatically loose a 10% market share or your infantry to shooting ineffectually, yes some BPs can be re configured, but in the heat of battle, if a discarded weapon is picked up to use and it blows brass (or worse, cuts) in a face? the former Soviets/ Russians experimented successfully w/ forward ejecting rifles. Kel-tec has the RFB. cannot speak personally but concept is no longer a concept.

  • MRHapla

    And Raplhie was wearing eye protection.

  • Daisuke0222

    Sign me up. I’ll take one.