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  • Sam Deeley-Crane

    I was at the Yoevilton air day yesterday. and saw hurricanes and spitfires flying

    • mo green

      You guys should have kicked out Churchill and made peace with AH- then maybe you wouldn’t have to now fear walking through many English neighborhoods at night.

      • mosinman

        this has nothing to do with anything.

        • mo green

          Kind of like who cares about some English broads loading guns- I mean- sh#t- this kind of stuff can be seen in old Encylopedia Britannicas

          • Fred Johnson

            Who has old Encylopedia Britannicas these days? You?

          • Xanderbach

            I have one from 1937- The last of the imperial encyclopedias. Yet these pictures still interest me.

      • Darhar M.

        Which has nothing to do with historical photos and if they are not of interest to you
        go troll somewhere else.

    • Lucky dog!

      • Sam Deeley-Crane

        it was amazing the vulcan was flying there, there was 2 a-10’s on the ground as well as a c-17 and lots of explosions from the apache display team. they flew a huey while playing ride of the valkyries. the royal merines had full of weapons including a ar-15 type rifle and some cool mp5’s and the newest version of the hk 40mm gmg and a aw 50 rifle

    • Anton Gray Basson

      I thought I was lucky just to be in London for the fly by this year

  • mo green

    Oy vey- what’s with all of the WWII stuff- was it the only war with firearms ever fought?

    • Porty1119

      The largest advances in firearms development definitely occurred during WWII.

  • ghost

    Isn’t there some kind of pest control on this site?

  • Jay

    Must have sucked flying .303 armed Hurricane, in fall 1943. When you look what the competition was using on the other side of the Channel, must have been demoralizing, going in that slow Hurricane against Bf-109Gs and FW-190 A4’s and A5’s. Pierre Closterman, talks about some missions he flew in Spitfire Mk5 to escort some of this Hurricanes loaded with bombs across the channel. Very few of the Hurricanes made it back.

    • mosinman

      yeah it probably did. although i’m pretty sure 12x .303s could shred a Bf109 or 190 if they happened to be in the Hurricane’s gunsight

      • Jay

        That’s true, but the Hurricane was not even able to hold it’s own by that point in the war, without bomb racks and bombs, over England. Sending those slow planes, loaded with bombs, across the channel, in the claws of JG-26, JG-2, and JG-5, was such a waste of good men.

        • mosinman

          no, it could only hope to exploit a bad pilot in a turning match.
          the Hurricane gave good account of itself over Britan though, both against fighters and bombers

    • kyphe

      These are navy hurricanes used for defense of shipping. They had very low loss rates and very high kill rates right up to the end of the war. RAF hurricanes that went over Europe in 43 were armed with 4 20mm cannon and most made it back. Hurricanes suffered the most against the Japanese as they had fighters that could both out pace and more importantly out turn a hurricane! which German aircraft could not do.

  • Lance

    Got to love the Hawker Hurricane 2nd best fighter the Brits had in WW2 . 2nd only to the Spitfire.

    • Jeremy David Thomson

      And the Tempest?

      • 00

        Brits also had P51 Mustangs.

        • Anton Gray Basson

          The Brits are the reason the P-51 was born.

    • wclardy

      What about the Mosquito?

      • Secundius

        @ wclardy.

        A typical de Haviland DH.98 “Mossie” or Mosquito had four Vickers .303 in the nose. it varied from Model to Model. One Model called the “Tsetse” mounted a Ordnance QF 6-pdr. Mk. IIA (57x441mm/R) in 50-caliber barrel length with a Molin Autoloader Anti-Tank Gun…

        • wclardy

          Secundus, I was referring to it in the context of “best fighter the Brits had in WW2.”
          I think the Mosquito was a better fighter overall than the more iconic Spitfire or Hurricane — despite being originally designed as a light bomber.

          • Secundius

            @ wclardy.

            Overall, your probably right. But the Mk. V Tempest, was the Fastest British Piston Engine Fighter. With a Top Speed ~465mph. But, the Fastest Piston Engine Fighter of WW2, was the Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250 at ~513mph in level flight…

  • idahoguy101

    Eight .303 caliber Browning machine guns proved less than optimum against the ME-109’s and FW-190’s by 1943. But for ground attack, along with bombs they worked. In the Battle of Britain the Hurricane shot down more Germans than the acclaimed Spitfire did. But that was over Britain in 1940. 1943 was different. Exactly why the Fleet Air Arm was using Hurricanes for in 1943 isn’t explained

    • J-

      Th M2 had the best balance of extended range (500 yd) power against aircraft while still having a high rate of fire and large ammo capacity. The Germans went with the 20mm which could take out an engine with a single bullet but had a much lower rate of fire and held must less ammo. Early on the Brits used the .303 which was effective on WWI fighters out to about 300 yds but found out that they were only effective on WWII fighters if they hit the pilot. Self healing armored fuel tanks wouldn’t rupture from a .303.

      • Secundius

        @ J-

        A good RAF Pilot could get kill shot’s up to 800-yards with the .303…

        • J-

          No offense but I’d like to see a source on this. The US Army Air Corps taught dogfighting maneuver and set the point of convergence of the machine guns at 300 yards. This was due to several factors including: 300 yards was about the closest an air crewman could identify friend from foe by markings, hitting a moving target past that distance was near impossible, and that was the max point blank range of the .50 and the pilot didn’t have to factor in ballistic drop along with everything else into hitting an enemy aircraft.

          800 yards with the .303 out of one moving fighter against another seems so unlikely as to be a fluke.

  • TheNotoriousIUD

    Nice overalls, baby.

  • Blake

    awesome pic

  • Zebra Dun

    Even in .303 that’s quite a hail of bullets to come your way, I bet no German or Italian ever brushed it off like it was nothing.

  • Secundius

    That must have been an Ironic Experience for the Luftwaffe Aircrew’s. Then firing the 7.92x57mm at the RAF and the RAF firing virtually the same round .303 British (7.92×56.44mm) back at them…