Slide Fire Lowers Their Bump-Fire Stock Prices

slidefirestock

Slide Fire recently announced on their Facebook page that they’ve lowered their prices on many of their bump-fire stocks. Their SSAR-15 OGR, SSAR-15 SBS, SSAK-47 XRS, SSAI-MC XAE and SSAI-MC XJC all received a price drop. One of their main stocks the SSAR-15 OGR is now priced at $179.95, down from its original $369 MSRP. Is the novely of these bump-fire stocks wearing thin? Or is Slide Fire feeling the squeeze from the competition who are selling a similar product at a lower price point? $99 to be exact. Slide Fire did sue Bump Fire Systems last year.

Check out Slidefire.com for more info on their new pricing.

[Source: Guns.com]



Ray I.

Long time gun enthusiast, archery noob, Mazda fan, Sci-Fi nerd, Whiskey drinker, online marketer and blogger. My daily firearms musings can be found over at my gun blog ArmoryBlog.com and Instagram.

Shoot me an email at ray.i@staff.thefirearmblog.com


Advertisement

  • JumpIf NotZero

    Race to the bottom of the novelty market… Big surprise! Good for these companies duping people into spending money on a dumb product but it seems like it’s almost over now.

    On the topic of BumpFire… Overheard at LGS on Sunday: “So this here makes it like a machine gun, you just, um, hold like here [holding for hip fire] and it’s all like badadadadadadadadadadadada, but I only want a machine gun if I can use “machine gun ammo” because normal bullets would be too expensive”….. Dude was in his mid fourties. So the type of guy interested in these, I’m going to say isn’t concerned with buying a quality product or that they would see issues with race to the bottom economics.

    … And this was about 2 minutes after I saw an obese 30 year old with his obese mother pull his 6″ revolver out from a poorly fitting leather cowboy action holster and point it at the clerk showing him this was the length he wanted a Judge or other .410 revolver in.

    … I wish those were uncommon occurrences. I try to not go to gun stores.

    • Vitsaus

      Novelty stuff is, was, and always will be based on the “race to the bottom” principle. The reason is simple: Its novelty, its not for serious use, bumpfire stocks are not going to be issued to the 101th airborne, they aren’t going to be shipped to the new Iraqi army… they are for bubbahs to play with. Getting worked up over it is a waste of time. Be angry at things like Hi-points, Maverick Shotgun, and Model 1 Sales. They’re the stuff thats cheapening the industry where it counts, and for the former two, putting guns in the hands of people show shouldn’t have them. But being sore over the bump fire stock is like being pissed at Groucho Marx fake nose/glasses for hurting the real glasses industry. They have nothing to do with each other.

      • Jack Morris

        Yeah, damn poor people. Who the hell do they think they are. How dare a firearm company make guns affordable enough for people at the poverty line to protect themselves.

        • mosinman

          The gall of these poor folk! Thinking they can rent a lane next to me is inconceivable!!

        • Bob

          I guess the only thing to do is to outlaw private gun ownership, and allow the rich to hire private security firms. Thank you, Micheal Bloomberg, for showing us the way.

        • Vitsaus

          It was less classist and more in reference to how often those guns appear in evidence lockers. Hi-points are appealing to criminals because of their price, making them very good for disposal, and make for a quick straw purchase. As far as poor people buying guns is concerned, quite frankly if you’ve got 139 bucks lying around, you can save that for a few months and get something better. Its hot so much a question of what some one can afford, rather, how long they are willing to wait. It took me months to save up for my first 1911. I could have easily bought a Hi-Point 45, but chose to set aside money from my (at the time minimum wage job) to buy something nice.

          • Jack Morris

            Some people don’t have the luxury of saving up for months or years when their well being or life is in jeopardy. Your argument is sounding eerily familiar to the gun-grabbers logic – guns are too easy to buy and that’s why people do bad things with guns! Only a few select people with high status should be allowed to have them!
            I’m not buying it.

          • Cal S.

            That’s just stupid, right there. I’m sorry, I try to stay polite, but saying that guns ought to be expensive to keep them out of criminal hands is ignorant and just plain wrong.

            You’re right, if you can save up, by all means buy better quality gear. No one’s arguing that. We’ve been told to buy the best we can afford. If all someone can afford is a $140 handgun/shotgun and they just got an imminent death threat, they don’t have the luxury of having time to save up, do they? Hi-Points have mixed reviews, I grant you that, but if they go boom when you need them to…

          • Vitsaus

            The majority of people who buy saturday night specials just received an imminent death threat? Sounds reasonable. Drug dealers are always threatening each other.

          • Grindstone50k

            The majority of people that buy a Hi-Point is a criminal/drug dealer? The majority of people that buy cheap guns are criminals?

            Seriously, you’re just an elitist pr!ck. And your own words “putting guns in the hands of people show shouldn’t have them” are right out of the anti-gun playbook of the gun industry supplying arms directly to school shooter and such. You need to stop putting your foot in your mouth and take a few minutes to think before you type. Your words are neither factual nor rational.

          • Bill

            Having audited police evidence rooms, invariably if its a Citori or Gold Cup, it’s stolen, and if it’s a Raven or HighPoint it was taken off a parole violator or out of a meth lab or seized at a domestic dispute.

            People who buy cheap guns are likely cheap people.

          • Grindstone50k

            Guns seized as evidence in crimes tend to be used in crimes? You do realize what “bias sampling” means, right?

            Again, equating inexpensive with criminal.

          • Bill

            Wrong. Guns in evidence rooms are just that – evidence. They may be stolen property waiting for return to the owner, recovered at a suicide, found property, there are any number of reasons other than being used in a crime. I don’t recall the numbers, but the last one I did had far more long guns than handguns, quite a few of which had been used in wildlife crimes.

          • Grindstone50k

            Yet long guns are used in far less crimes than handguns, per FBI stats. Again, your personal anecdote does not equate to empirical data.

          • valorius

            or poor….

            ever recovered a colt python from a poor woman that just shot her stalker in her home? im guessing no.

            elitists suck.

          • mosinman

            Damn I have years of unsold drugs!! I need to start hustling to make up for all those years thinking i was a law abiding citizen. Now I just need to take my hi point and raven .25 and earn street cred Fo sho.
            thanks guys!

          • freak smiley

            DU is <—– that way.

          • JumpIf NotZero

            Trust me, you’ll “lose” every public opinion pole here on this site about cheap guns. This has got to be the biggest collection of the cheapest gun buyers anywhere.

            You go to MSW, Moderno, m4carbine, lightfighter, gearscout, or almost anywhere else and hipoints and bump-fire stocks would be laughed into oblivion… Here, strickly defended.

            It’s like bizarro world.

          • Grindstone50k

            You are missing the point completely. A gun is a gun. If a Hi-Point is all someone can afford, so be it. Blanket labeling Hi-Point owners as criminals is just as bad as the antis who blanket label gun owners as crazed murderers. Further blanket labeling inexpensive guns as “cheapening” the industry is just narrow-minded and frankly elitist. If it brings prices down, fine, but that doesn’t mean quality is dropping too.

            Of course the “tactical” type are going to have strong opinions on anything that isn’t HSLD, but who cares. Buy what you want.

          • nadnerbus

            Do you feel that way about cars too?

            I know the perils of the car/gun analogy, but in this one case I think it fits.

            If all you can afford is a Kia Rio or a Hyundai Accent does that mean you should just not buy a car, because they aren’t a BMW S series or a Lexus? You get some serious perks with the latter two, longer service life, better handling, pretty much superior in every way. But the cheap ones will get you where you need to go too.

            If you have a problem with ignorant gun bubbas that flag clerks at the gun store, that is one thing. But equating their behavior with the item they purchase is a logical leap.

          • Cal S.

            Yes. You must, MUST buy the absolute most expensive firearm there is! Nothing less will do, in JINZ’s mind. You see your credit limit on your credit card, your account balance, and your credit line? Combine it. That’s how much you spend on your basic, run of the mill AR. After all, you don’t want to risk your life on a ‘cheap’ $900 AR, would you?

            JINZ just has a grudge against anyone with less money than he has.

          • sam

            Well said. Also, like pretty much everyone here I like firearms, but cash is fungible. Money not spent on a gun can be used for something else. Every other good or service someone might want is an reason to buy a lower priced gun rather than higher priced. So I don’t see it as being a violent criminal thing.

          • nadnerbus

            It’s the whole reason markets work. Market segmentation. If you want to bring a product into a market that is already relatively full, you need to find a segment of the market that is under served and design a product that addresses that niche. Jump up there has his consumer needs fulfilled very well by the medium to high end suppliers, who can make good profit on lower volume sales because they build more margin into the pricing of their goods. You can do what with high quality luxury goods.

            Hi Point addressed the low end of the market. At that end, you can’t make money on quality, you have to make it on volume. You achieve volume by cheap mass production and low price barrier.

            To say it is a race to the bottom is just plain wrong. It is a race to market saturation. And that saturation means more options for everyone. Options mean competition, which controls price inflation. I just don’t see how that can be bad for anyone.

          • valorius

            because those sites attract a lot of know it all gun snobs.

            sorry but they just do

            hi points are ugly as sin, but they absolutely do work. and work well.

            their 995 9mm is an almost perfectly ideal home defense weapon for a poor person who wishes to defend their family but who have a very small budget.

            my god son has one with the ati stock, it is dead balls reliable, and at home defense ranges, it might as well be a death ray, it is so accurate. loaded with 11 rds of 9mm+P+ speer gold dot youd be hard pressed to find a more practical defensive arm so long is its not intended to have to brave harsh elements, something a home defense gun does not need to do.

          • Cal S.

            So everyone who buys a Hi-Point or a cheap import shotgun is a drug dealer? Never arises from immediate need or permanently low budget? Seems legit. You know so much, please lecture us all more!

          • valorius

            diane fienstien, is that you?

          • Bill

            How often do people have to buy a gun due to an “imminent death threat?” Realistically?

          • Grindstone50k

            So then you don’t have a problem with waiting periods?

          • Bill

            Of course I don’t. But my question still stands: seriously, how many times does someone get an actual imminent death threat and have to bolt out the door after collecting all the change from between the couch cushions to be a High-Point or a Raven?

            You are reading WAY too much into this. My favorite gun is a Stevens .22 I paid next to nothing for, but it is what it is. It will never be the equal of an Accuracy International AWP, nor do I expect it to be.

            And I don’t own an AI because I bought a house instead.

          • Grindstone50k

            What threshold of people needing to quickly arm themselves would you deem sufficient? If it’s only one, then that one person doesn’t matter? Finally, why does it even matter?

            I don’t care what you own. Yet you seem to care lots about what other people own.

            Also, always nice to see an LEO that is in favor of restrictions on 2A-recognized rights.

          • Bill

            Dude, I can recognize when someone’s spoiling for a fight: stop answering questions with questions, it’s a sure sign that you don’t have facts to back anything up. I couldn’t care less what anyone owns, assuming that they aren’t a convicted felon or violent criminal. Again, you are seeing things that don’t exist: if you want to collect Hi-Points, have at it. I have a better understanding of your biases now.

            Reading is fundamental: where did I indicate favoring any 2A restrictions? Dodge that one now. I asked how often someone has had to buy a gun RIGHT NOW because of an IMMINENT THREAT and you’ll try to twist that into me wanting a waiting period. Nice try, no cookie.

          • Jack Morris

            You may want to revisit your answer to Grindstone’s question. You clearly stated you were in favor of waiting periods to buy a firearm.

          • Cal S.

            You just said “Of course I don’t” in answer to the question: “you don’t have a problem with waiting periods?” which means you support waiting periods which translates to supporting 2A restrictions. Yeah.

            I’m not aware of statistics on the matter, but I’m simply trading supposition for supposition. You suppose that only criminals buy cheap guns because they’re cheap and therefore all guns ought to be more expensive because any law-abiding citizen should know better and save up over time. I’m supposing that there are completely legitimate reasons to buy cheap guns for honest citizens.

          • Bill

            OK. I”ll rephrase, I dont support waiting periods. I support buying guns from vending machines. The only waiting period I support is standing in line at the NICS machine, because line cutting is rude. Clear now? I’d would think that someone who can guess my suppositions would have figured that out.

          • Grindstone50k

            Reading IS fundamental. I suggest you read again.

          • Bill

            After someone else caught my error for you, I suggest you answer the question.

          • Grindstone50k

            Your question is bunk as there is obviously no reliable data on people who need a gun immediately, but any rational person knows it is a non-zero number. Further, the point of your question has no bearing on the discussion and only furthers to misdirect from the subject that some people need cheap guns. Again, your accusations are without merit. Again, you have been shown that your position is unsupported. And again your “data” is merely personal anecdote, which any rational thinking person would reject as any reliable source. You argue from a place of emotion and bias against those on the lower end of the socioeconomic scale or those who don’t wish to pay large amounts of money for a firearm. Basically, you’re an a$$.

          • Bill

            Ok, you win, I’m not wasting any more of my life debating the value of a Hi-Point. The brand is a good fit for you.

          • Grindstone50k

            Thanks for proving my point even further.

          • valorius

            there actually is….anyone who gets a restraining order can legitimately be said to have an immediate need for a firearm.

            so anyone that buys a gun after getting a restraining order fits his qualifier. lots and lots of such people buy guns every single day in this country.

          • valorius

            people buy guns every day for self defense based on an imminent threat,

            every single day.

          • valorius

            thanks for showing us in your own words that you are anti gun.

          • Bill

            You are about 4 days too late, or REALLY can’t read. I explained myself after misinterpreting what someone else wrote.

          • valorius

            every single day.

          • Grindstone50k

            Not too long ago an elderly fellow shot a home invader using a SCCY. But I suppose he should’ve saved up for a nice Glock instead, right? Especially considering he confessed he wasn’t a gun enthusiast. Better that he spend twice the amount of the SCCY and get a REAL gun! Practicality be damned.

          • Cal S.

            Poor, ignorant sod. Didn’t know any better. If he’d just bought that $3,000 limited-edition, custom match 1911 he saw in a magazine once, things may have turned out so much better!

          • John

            I own a hipoint. They are quality products. I love mine because the 45 recoil is small and very smooth. I like the fixed barrel. Just like my classic HK. I’m not poor. I own watches that cost more than machine guns and lots of HKs

          • valorius

            some poor mom with 4 kids on food stamps and an abusive ex cant just ‘save for a few more months.’

            hi points serve a legitimate legal purpose.

        • Cal S.

          Right? I mean, we all know that guns are just for rich people to have!

          Down with sub-$2,000 ARs!!! Outlaw them!

      • Grindstone50k

        My dad’s first gun purchase was a Maverick shotgun and it serves him well. What is there to be angry about? You sound extremely elitist.

      • valorius

        people who shouldnt have them? you mean ‘peasants’?

        dont be an elitist.

  • echelon

    No it’s not too thin nor are they feeling any undue pressure…they introduced two brand new designs at SHOT that are superior to the originals in every way so they are just dumping stock to make room for the new models, you know like car companies do, and electronics companies, and, and…

    • TK Carnage

      Spot on

  • MR

    For one, it’s April fool’s day. But Grabagun’s been selling them for less than that for a while, now.

  • Bill

    Ok, who wrote a letter to the ATF?

  • jeff k

    they simply cant compete with another company selling the same product for 99 bucks! thats whats great about america. competition lowers the cost to the consumer. charging 400 bucks for a product that cost 25 bucks to make is called raping the consumer and people are not stupid. there use to be a big demand and small supply for the stock so they raped people with the price but now the demand is almost gone and the market is flooded with knock offs. they have to lower the price or they wont sell anymore.

    • M

      I wonder if the Streisand Effect had anything to do with it. In other words, the fact they sued Bump Fire Systems brought the company into the spotlight and people went: “Oh, there’s a way cheaper alternative??” resulting in a loss of business

  • Josh

    I believe you can use your belt loop and finger for free.

    • Ken

      Some guns can be bump fired off the shoulder with a little practice. The SKS is one. You can also bump fire most semi autos from prone if there is a bipod. RPK works great for that.

      • highhammer

        i can bump fire an ak fairly well from the shoulder too.

    • nadnerbus

      And both will lighten your wallet by ten or twenty dollars every time you do it.

      Bump fire is fun for a handful of times. I can’t fathom spending even the $99 for the knockoff for something that is just going to help me burn through ammo faster.

      • Cal S.

        On the other hand, Slide-Fire’s “Bump Sled” would be a really good idea for civilian-owned armored vehicles.

    • Anon. E Maus

      Can’t do that from the shoulder, that’s the appeal of these.
      Not that you need your belt-loop to bump-fire without one of these stocks.

      • Sickshooter0

        That really depends how high you wear your pants.

  • Grindstone50k

    Thinking about picking up one just to d!ck around when shooting outside on a friend’s land. Glad the prices are going down.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      Makes sense. No surprise here.

      • Grindstone50k

        I know, I like to have fun sometimes. Weird, huh?

  • Mike Price

    The thing is an over priced $5.00 piece of plastic. Neither one should be much over $30 retail.

  • Ken

    How long before the Chinese sell them for $20 (or less)?

  • Handy Manny

    Markets 🙂 gotta love it. Other companies had similar product for 99 dollars 300 for a toy is a joke it was a matter of time.

  • valorius

    these things were massively overpriced before. and guess what…. theyre still a little bit overpriced. they too should be about a hundred bucks.

  • valorius

    these are a novelty, but the model for the mp15-22 is really neat. .22 ammo is still really cheap, and a sfs turns one into a really neat bullet hose.