Gaston Glock Barrel Knives

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Gaston J. Glock is making limited edition damascus knives with renowned blacksmith, Balbach. The knives are extremely limited. The reason? The metal used to make these knives are made from the competition Glock 35 barrels of World Champion shooter, Dave Sevigny. Two of the three barrels were used to win USPSA National Championships. The third barrel is from his practice gun that he used to prepare for the matches. Ammoland has the details on these knives:

Barrel1

 

This pistol was used to win the 2005 USPSA Limited-10 Nationals and 2006 USPSA Limited Nationals, which represented Sevigny’s 4th and 6th USPSA National Championship wins. Both of these Nationals were hosted at the PASA Park in Quincy, Ill. and were composed of 18 stages with over 350 competitors participating across all divisions. The Limited-10 division differentiates itself from the regular limited division by limiting shooters to ten rounds per magazine. Sevigny also won several other regional and state level championships using this same barrel.

Once a barrel, now transformed into a stunning knife, the first knife in the collection features a contrasting blue and green mammoth molar handle, shot through with streaks of white, creating a beautiful compliment to the 320 layer Damascus Steel Blade.

Barrel2

Blade composition includes the pistol barrel Dave Sevigny used to win the 2008 USPSA Limited-10 Nationals at the US Shooting Academy in Tulsa, Oklahoma and later the 2009 USPSA Limited-10 Nationals at the Boulder Rifle and Pistol Club in Boulder City, NV. The wins marked Dave’s 8th and 9th USPSA National championships. On top of the National Championships, Dave used this barrel for practice, training and to win several other regional and state level championships.

This all-purpose hunting knife is as functional as it is beautiful. The finger grooves in the hardened ivory handle make this blade as easy in the hand as it is on the eyes; the full-tang Damascus blade provides near perfect stability.

Barrel3

Blade composition includes the pistol barrel Dave Sevigny used to practice and train for his competitions. Perhaps the simplest of the gun barrels has produced the most striking of the three knives. The same 320 layer Damascus steel blade is the soul of this knife, with the same form and function as knives one and two. Where this knife shines is the dark stained handle, made from Mammoth Molar Rind, the rich dark brown flashing in contrast to the beautifully patterned blade.

All three knives are unique, with individual serial numbers; and come complete with a traditionally crafted saddle leather scabbard. Only GASTON J. GLOCK style LP carries these exclusive knives, and these are the only three on the planet.

These knives can be yours for $3,900 – $4,500 each. Go to Gaston Glock’s website for more info.


Nicholas C

Co-Founder of KRISSTALK forums, an owner’s support group and all things KRISS Vector related. Nick found his passion through competitive shooting while living in NY. He participates in USPSA and 3Gun. He loves all things that shoots and flashlights. Really really bright flashlights.

Any questions please email him at nicholas.c@staff.thefirearmblog.com


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  • micmac80

    Hmm how does the relatively soft and low grade steel used in pistol barrels preform in a knife blade ?

    • I don’t think you buy one of these with the intent of batoning it into a log on the weekends.

    • Nicholas Chen

      I think the traditional folding technique over comes that problem.

      • Sure, but if you’re melting down Dave Sevigny’s USPSA title-winning Glock barrel and turning it into a knife with mammoth-tooth scales, practical performance in the field is likely not even a consideration.

        Cool stuff, for sure though.

      • micmac80

        You mean folding a bit of barrel still with over whole lot of knife steel

      • Giolli Joker

        No it doesn’t.
        Unless you include a different (higher C content) steel to be used for the edge.
        That can work and it is one of the traditional ways to get a hard edge and a flexible spine.

    • kipy

      Can’t wait for the nutnfancy review lol

      • 40 minutes of video about how well it fits in his fanny pack!

        • BuzzKillington

          LOL

    • Tierlieb

      If Glock uses some standard steel like 42CrMo4, it is not going to be too shabby. You can probably get some 55 HRC out of a small diameter like that. Used as mono steel, it would make a good chopper, though it is not perfect for a Loveless-style droppoint hunter as shown. Still, it should be at least as good as the Glock M78 and M80 field knives 😉

      But let’s be serious here (but not so serious as to point out it is a presentation knife only): The pattern would be very weak if one only relied on the welding lines for contrast. The damascus pictured has either some nickel-based steel for the highlights or strong manganese steel for the darker areas (probably both), otherwise the contrast wouldn’t pop that much. Simply using some 75Ni8 or 90MnCrV8 (both standard tool steels in Austria) for the other layers would increase the carbon content enough to harden this to 60 HRC.

  • Vitsaus

    Tough choice for fanboys… might have to skip a call to Salient or Zev to buy this thing.

  • Lol, silly Glock people.

    • guest

      You’ll have to run that by me again.
      As far as expensive silly things go…
      Cough cough *guncrafter industries* cough cough

  • Ripley

    Well, Gaston made knives for decades before his venture into pistols, so it’s no celebrity George Foreman grill. But the guy is also an 85 y/o megalomaniac billionaire that divorced Helga his wife since 49 years, fired all his children from the company, and married his 32 y/o nurse. Now in a fierce family feud. Hmm, but his knife shop has battleship Tirpitz steel knives too. Me want 😛

    • Yallan

      All pretty common sense decisions, the Glock way.

  • mosinman

    Will it have the same “ergonomics” as said glock pistols?

    • sometrend

      lol,I caught the scarcasm. I have a couple glocks…and 1 of em is a 35. I don`t carry a glock precisely because of the ergonomics. Is there any other gun that utilizes the same grip angle!?

      • mosinman

        i’m glad you did 🙂 and i think the glock is unique in that aspect lol

  • 3XLwolfshirt

    Cool, but…

    no.

  • Jack Morris

    Ha, just in case you wanted to buy a knife instead of [insert insanely priced dream gun here.]
    Some people just have too much damn money.

  • Grindstone50k

    Maybe it’s because I don’t come from a wealthy background, but I will just never understand such conspicuous consumption.

    • ThomasD

      Not so much consumption as re-purposing.

      The metal was already being used in the barrel, so on that end nothing new has been consumed.

      Ultimately the transformation from barrel to knife only has the net effect of creating a better balance between the new owner’s brains and his money.

    • You could argue it’s a decent inflation hedge. Its “value” would never go down. /shrugs

  • RealitiCzech

    $3900? What’s that in drachmas?

  • tony

    On the other hand, it is a good gift for Saudi princes.

  • sam

    Yeah, I’m not feeling it. I don’t follow the sport, so no ambiance there for me. I can’t think of any contemporary source of metal that would have it, or any erm, historical-but-still-scrap-like thing such as the battleship.

  • Nice knife, but I’m not slashing my fabergé egg budget to acquire one.

  • jeff k

    and the “my knife is better than your knife” debate picks up where the glock fanboys left it

  • sometrend

    Hmmm,4500 bucks will set you up with a good colt carbine,an M1A match and a 226…and leave you with a few bucks for bullets,powder and primers. I like a good knife,I just don`t like them to the tune of 4 house payments!

  • BuzzKillington

    Any plans to offer knives that aren’t up-charged 2000% because of whose barrel they were made from? They look nice and I like them. No way I’ll be paying $4k because they used to be something that they’re not anymore.