Hi Point Introduces Carbine in .380 ACP Caliber

hi-point-380

For those who own .380 cal Hi Point pistols, Hi Point has introduced a model of their Carbine as a companion piece. From the press release:

Finally, a fun, tough .380 carbine that almost anyone can afford! The Hi-Point Carbine is the same size as its larger-bore brothers in 9mm, .40S&W, and .45 ACP and it’s hard shooting, accurate and almost recoil-free.

Its 16.5-inch barrel will launch .380 bullets as hard and fast as a full-power 9mm handgun, maybe even harder (when you add several inches of barrel over that of a handgun, you gain 100-150 feet per second higher velocity and possibly more with hot or +P loads). With the added velocity performance the .380’s effective range (the distance a shooter can expect to get reliable on-target hits) is extended to a couple hundred yards.

For owners of Hi-Point .380 caliber pistols, this is a true made-in-heaven deal; both guns use the same ten-round magazines! Don’t have a Hi-Point .380? Buy both the carbine and the pistol for less than half the price of one too-pretty-to-use semi-auto pistol.

The Hi-Point .380 Carbine is not a fancy $1,200+ foreign carbine, but it is more robust than those pretty guns and will launch equivalent-power bullets at the same velocity — (gosh all gee willikers “amazing!”).

The Hi-Point .380 Carbine is a tough gun so owners don’t have to protect it to keep it beautiful because beautiful it ain’t, but reliable, tough and useable anywhere, it is!

At its low suggested retail price of $297.00, buyers will have plenty of money left over to buy a bunch of ammo.

Hi-Point offers several low-cost options for the .380 Carbine, including a vertical folding hand grip, optical sight, laser sight, and red-dot sight.

Specifications:

· Weight: 7 pounds
· Overall length: 31.5 inches
· Barrel length: 16.5 inches
· Magazine capacity: 10 rounds
· MSRP: $297.00

 

Companion carbines are one of those ideas that attract a lot of attention but tend not to sell well, due to their lack of capability. However, Hi Point’s carbines occupy attractive price point niches, and in this blogger’s experience are more popular than their better-branded cousins. However, the name “Hi Point” comes with some negative associations, and the offering definitely reflects its MSRP in overall build quality.

For those who use and like Hi Point’s .380 pistols, I expect the .380 Carbine will be welcome news, though. It’s a short, maneuverable gun that attains better performance than the pistols in that caliber thanks to the longer barrel. I don’t expect it to take the world by storm, but then it doesn’t really have to.



Nathaniel F

Nathaniel is a history enthusiast and firearms hobbyist whose primary interest lies in military small arms technological developments beginning with the smokeless powder era. In addition to contributing to The Firearm Blog, he runs 196,800 Revolutions Per Minute, a blog devoted to modern small arms design and theory. He can be reached via email at nathaniel.f@staff.thefirearmblog.com.


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  • floppyscience

    “Finally, a fun, tough .380 carbine that almost anyone can afford!”

    Is this something that somebody asked for? The 9mm is already virtually recoil-free. Even for .380 pistol owners I’d think it would be more practical to buy a couple 9x19mm magazines and enjoy the cheaper ammo.

    • Vitsaus

      Hey, some people might really see the practical benefit of shooting a significantly less powerful round than 9x19mm, but spending 2/3 more to shoot it.

      • wojtekimbier

        “significantly less powerful”
        Are you talking about .22lr? Because there isn’t much difference between .380 and 9mm in effectiveness.

        • Scott Tuttle

          maybe its for europeans? all I can think of.

          • Don Ward

            Nah. You need at LEAST a 9X18 Makarov chambering to hunt Europeans these days.

          • hi point= nope

            Nice !

          • Giolli Joker

            In Italy we can’t own 9x19mm but we have 9x21mm IMI that is exactly the
            same and the conversion is given by simply reaming the chamber 2 more
            mm, cartridge OAL is the same as are the loadings. Therefore all the
            guns in 9mm Luger are available to civilians in 9X21mm.
            As far as I know most other European countries have no such limitations.
            An imported Hi-point wouldn’t be much cheaper than a better quality product.
            Honestly I don’t think Hi-point has international distribution.

        • me ohmy

          300-400 FPS isnt much difference??
          puhlease.. 9MM +P+ out my CZ-75 is 9/10ths of a 357.
          380 will NEVER match that, unless loaded with C4

          • iksnilol

            Well, I can see a couple of ways you would load 380 with explosives.

            If penetration is a concern you can put a steel ball in the hollowpoint of a HP bullet. Concern as in you don’t get enough of it with your ammo.

        • Curious_G

          You are kidding right? I have never seen a ballistics test that came to that conclusion.

  • Don Ward

    Wow. The $297 price almost looks like a typo these days.

    • Cal S.

      Indeed. I honestly didn’t think new firearms could be had for less than $1500 these days!

      • Don Ward

        Certainly not in a rifle chambering a centerfire cartridge.

        • billybob

          Check out Ruger American Rifle in all popular calibers.

      • YS

        This is barely a firearm…

        • Cal S.

          Their other PCCs (9mm, .40, & .45) are right around that price range as well. Compare that with a $1,100 9mm AR-platform and it will make you wonder why the latter is so wide-spread.

          I guess people like spending $700 extra for looks and expensive proprietary magazines?

          • iksnilol

            Also for higher capacity. The Hi-Points are singlestack and thus limited in capacity compared to doublestack mags. Though the limited capacity is also a + for people in magazine restricted places.

          • Cal S.

            I suppose, but as I’ve mentioned on other designs in the past, $500-$600 buys an awful lot of ammunition and magazines.

            Promag makes a more-or-less reliable 15-rounder for the Hi-Points.

          • John Pryce

            Apparently you have to work the springs a bit for the ProMags. The forum recommendation I’ve seen is to fill the new magazine and let it sit for a few days.

          • mosinman

            I never understood why Hi-point limited its carbines to single stacks.

          • John Pryce

            They started making them under the AWB of the 90s. Hence the decision.
            As to why they haven’t changed, not sure. But they HAVE started making extended magazines that hold 15.

          • billybob

            Only in 9mm so far……….

          • Ko I

            Yeah, when they redesigned the stock, which was after the Evil Black Rifle Ban, that was the time to do something smart, like have them take Glock magazines, or at least a proprietary double-stack magazine.

          • John Pryce

            Hi-Points are stamped metal. Much cheaper than milled. Think old-style AK-47 manufacturing. They aren’t precision weapons by any stretch, but they work fine at the ranges they are rated for.
            Also, the designs are direct-blowback rather than gas-powered, which is not only cheaper but more durable and better able to handle hot loads. Despite the low cost, ALL Hi-Point firearms – pistols and carbines alike as far as I know – are +P rated
            The company is based out of a major machining industry area in Ohio, so their materials and labor are less expensive as a result.

          • Cal S.

            And with the fact that their designs are practically indistinguishable from each other most likely yields a great deal of parts interchangeability, keeping the price down quite a bit as well.

          • billybob

            Ugly reliable accurate and guaranteed forever

          • Paul White

            for a gun that works much much better? Also I think Just Right’s retail for a lot less than 1100.

            Personally though I don’t get 9mm AR carbines either.

          • Cal S.

            Well, for a guy that shoots .40 S&W (GASP!!!) and wants a carbine, I
            have exactly 4 choices that I know of. Only two of those fall under
            $450; Hi-Point and the Kel Tec Sub-2000 (I own the latter).

          • Paul White

            I’d take the Kel Tec over the hi point any year after what I’ve seen with their handguns.

            I want a 10mm carbine that takes 20 round mags.

            And a semi auto .357 with a rotary mag that holds 10-12 shots, with an 18″ barrel.

            And a pony. just, while I’m dreaming 🙁

          • dan citizen

            “20 round mags”
            “rotary mag that holds 10-12 shots”
            “And a pony”

            Ponies aren’t that hard to hit, a single shot should do it.

          • John Pryce

            I usually see those for the $700 range. That’s more than 3x what a HiPoint costs.

          • Ko I

            Well, they also get a gun that doesn’t wear out in 5000 rounds (personal experience), doesn’t really *need* a warranty, and has a shred of reliability.

          • Cal S.

            Hi Point has a ‘shred’ or two of reliability as well. Your average shooter isn’t going to go through that many rounds in their lifetimes. If you do, then clearly you do need a better gun, and therefore the higher price tag may include those better options. However, I will say that $$$ does not necessarily mean quality.

        • dan citizen

          Let’s see… Reliable, accurate, durable. Yep, that’s a firearm.

          • YS

            I don’t think durable and cast zinc go together.

          • mosinman

            after 6 years of use, my Hi Point disagrees with that statement

          • billybob

            Haven’t worn out my .40cal carbine. Did get the newer stock for it though. Not sure the springs in the butt were needed but they didn’t hurt the accuracy any!

  • nova3930

    Those suckers are ugly hunks but they sure are fun to shoot lol

  • ScottishMinor

    I want a 10mm one. :/

    • Raven

      10mm with a cast zinc slide…yeah, that’s gonna go well.

    • Alucard

      Will you feel the same way when it kabooms?

    • billybob

      The .40 version is a FUN toy! Goes bang any time I pull the happy switch and will hit what I aim it at out to 100 yards easy. Yes, it’s double butt ugly, but so is an A-10, and I can’t play with one of them!

  • Max Scholz

    A Highpoint that takes glock mags would have been a much better idea.

    • Vitsaus

      Not really, their customers might not make rent if the mags were 30 bucks.

    • Alucard

      Maybe if it could chew through a 33 round glock magazine without jamming but that’s a lot like expecting a yugo to be a good car.

      • mosinman

        It’ll chew through ammo with its cheaply constructed mag so…..
        And its more like expecting a Lada Niva to look like a nice Jeep. It’s ugly, clunky and heavy but it works and its much cheaper than other pistols

        • Max Scholz

          +1

      • dan citizen

        HiPoints are not at all finicky.

        • Alucard

          In my experience they’ve jammed and had problems similar to jennings guns.

  • So…..is there going to be a review of this?If not, what is planned on being reviewed, if any?

  • me ohmy

    I’d still prefer it in 9mm…380 is a nice pocket pistol round but 9mm will perform nicely in a longer barrel,quieter too

    • iksnilol

      They still make a 9x19mm version if I am not mistaken. More options is all.

      • John Pryce

        Indeed they do.

  • AC11

    “Finally, a fun, tough .380 carbine that almost anyone can afford.” As opposed to the countless other .380 carbines that have flooded the market which are boring, wimpy, and are only marketed to the super-rich. Thank you Hi-Point. The prayers of PCC enthusiasts across the nation have been answered.

  • Zachary marrs

    Waiting on the .32 acp version and the .25 acp conversion kit

    • AC11

      Definitely! And the .22 short conversion is another must have!

      • Zachary marrs

        Gah, can’t believe I forgot

        • AC11

          And if we are REALLY lucky a .44 Special conversion after that!

    • sam

      Well, yes, but no. The conversion kit should clearly be for French 7.65mm lounge pistole caliber. Yanno, since its a carbine and… reasons.

  • Tater

    Why?

  • ozzallos .

    F&^&%$ hi-cap mags already, Hi-Point.

    • miamimike

      Ur hi-point warranty will be voided if u use promag and u should not consider 14,15 or 16 rds high cap in a rifle! The company should make at least a 20 shot mag across the board! ALL HI-POINT OWNERS WRITE A LETTER OR SEND AN E-MAIL TO THE MANSFIELD BLDG.1015 Springmill rd.Mansfield, Oh 44906

  • toms

    looks like a crutch

  • john

    Two things: One, I hope they put in a high power hammer spring to compensate for the super hard primers that .380 ammo has these days and TWO, why would you should expensive, hard to find.380 ammo when you can shoot cheaper, easy to find 9mm ammo? JMHO

    • john

      I meant :”shoot” not should.

    • John Pryce

      This might be meant for the South American market. Lots of those countries don’t allow their civvies to own military calibers like 9mm. That’s why GLOCK made the 25 and 28. They aren’t allowed here in the States because of the ATF’s import rules, but in most of Central and S America even the cops can’t have any standard military calibers.
      A .380 carbine might be just the ticket down there.

  • Sledgecrowbar

    This is like if Road & Track reported on Hyundai offering a new small crossover. Except my comment there would be harsh.

    I have to agree with the sentiment that this is another answer to a question nobody asked. A 9mm carbine is invited to every party because it’s the cheapest centerfire cartridge and already fun to shoot because it’s light, 380 I think adds to much ammo price disadvantage to not enough magazine commonality advantage. I guess if you’re hardcore about 380 this is your day, but is there even anyone like that?

    In the end, I’m always for new ideas, especially if they’re not another CNC spiked- or bola- pistol ammo for $6 per round. I’d like to see Hi-Point come out with a product line on par with the new ex-eastern bloc manufacture and used Glock/M&P market, I was always impressed at how they manage to keep a loyal following of gun enthusiasts when their product would seem to be marketed towards low-income folks who just want to protect themselves and aren’t terribly interested in the sport.

  • anonymous

    “For younger shooters, people with physical disabilities, or the elderly,
    who might have limited hand strength, this will have virtually no
    recoil and should be easier to charge than the 9mm version.”

    This is an internet gun forum. We just tell those people to get tougher and work around the gun, rather than acknowledging that perhaps a gun should be built to work around their needs and limitations.

    • J-

      Sometimes the attitudes held by the gun community just boggle my mind. I have been tinkering with a trigger mechanism for a firearm that is based of the triggers on paintball guns that use both the index and middle finger. My intention is to design a trigger for elderly shooters with arthritis so they can continue the sport they enjoy in their golden years. Making it ergonomic without being overly prone to accidental discharge is the key. A gun like a 10/22 outfitted with such a trigger would be (I think) an excellent gun for a grandpa with arthritis to take to the range with a grandson or granddaughter who at 8 or 9 might also benefit from a trigger that is easier to gain leverage on.

      There are 100 million shooters in this country and not all of them are operator-wannabes.

      • Tassiebush

        I recall reading that the Philippine Constablary had a specially made similar trigger for their revolvers due to concerns about hand strength.
        Good on you for working on such a worthy goal BTW! There is no reason in this day and age for not catering for anyone of sound mind and character!

    • 90david

      true and well stated there are people with medical issues who need personal protection weapons as they too are prayed on they ahave the same rights to safety as those who can handle 45 a.c.p.

  • Alucard

    Sure it is cheap,but is it worth it in the long run?
    This is a question you must ask yourself before buying anything.

  • Cal S.

    I guess this has applications for those that already have the .380 handgun. I honestly don’t know much about the ‘long-range’ performance of .380 acp. Couldn’t imagine it would be that much more than 75-100 yards at best, and wouldn’t want to see it’s energy past 50 yards.

    But, if you are boss enough to rock .380, go big or go home, I guess.

  • sam

    I totally understand the comments saying “why?”. Still, I kind of want it… Seems like it would be very pleasant in a CZ 455 ultra lux way. Should have an 20 or 22 inch pipe though, for you know, balance, proportion, even more excessive taming of propellant gas.

  • ryobiwankenobi

    This could be useful for those folks who conceal a 380 pistol and want something a little bigger for home defense that uses the same ammo . I know people in this category who would appreciate not having to keep 2 different calibers of practice and defense ammo. Some of these people are family that like to shoot but due to medical conditions and or recoil sensitivity need to go lighter than most of us would ever consider for ourselves. Thankfully they are deadly accurate to 25 yards with 380’s.

  • noguncontrol

    a 7 pound gun in .380? they should have made this in .30 mauser.

  • mosinman

    I think a hipoint carbine in .30 carbine would be cool

  • Stephen Beat

    Hello there, as a Brit I am no way informed enough on firearm intricacies as to be able to comment intelligently on the merits of .380. But I would say if I was a .380 handgun owner I would probably appreciate a paired coupling of the same calibre pistol/carbine. The idea of compatibility of ammunition does seem to be convenient. But why I’m writing is really to say that I am surprised at just how ugly this carbine is – I know some people like the whole ‘tacticool’ look but I have always admired American guns because of the beauty and elegance of their classic looks. I would have loved to have seen this carbine in a nice piece of wood. Apologies for my ‘amateur’ take on this issue.

    • John Pryce

      Hi-Point manufactures low-cost firearms for people who need a reliable weapon but can’t afford much. The result is that they don’t spend much on aesthetics.
      I agree with you; they are ugly. But with weapons, “pretty” is a relative term. I would imagine that someone whose life is saved by one of these wouldn’t tolerate any criticism of it.
      Like that father a few months back who took out a grizzly bear with a Hi-Point .45 pistol, when it was menacing his children. Apparently he only made one shot, but it was a heart shot.

    • Cal S.

      That has routinely been a criticism of Hi-Point. They make cheap, ugly guns. However, they have amazing warranties and by most accounts are extremely reliable.

      If I’m looking for a ‘plinker’ in a popular pistol caliber, or an extremely inexpensive home defense weapon that’s shorter than your standard rifle with the same (close-range) power, it’s gonna be a cheap, $300 Hi-Point.

      • Paul White

        I’ve known something like 8 people with Hi Point handguns; most of them have had problems and either done repair work themselves or sent them back. Eh.

        I don’t know anyone with a carbine from them but until I do–and those people are happy and they just work–I’m not taking a chance

        • Ko I

          I had a 4095. It was reliable until the crappy spray on finish started flaking off the feed ramp, resulting in it being about 90% reliable with FMJ and about 50% reliable with JHP. The sight was cross-threaded into the receiver. The trigger was the worst I’ve ever experienced, though not the heaviest or longest.
          I replaced it with a Beretta CX4. Not even an apples and oranges comparison. More like an apple and a turd comparison.

          • AC11

            Did you contact Hi-Point about the issue with the finish and if so what happened?

    • billybob

      Beauty is such a subjective thing. A machine that performs it’s function reliably, and durability are mechanical traits of beauty. But yes, it is UGLY!! and I love it!!!!

  • Curious_G

    Why would you not use a .22 for that application?

    • Geoff a well known Skeptic

      The hammer spring on a .22 revolver requires a heavier trigger pull than a center fire. A .380 is a marginal, but effective defense round, yes I prefer 9mm or .45. But if you have limited funds and recoil trouble, a Hi-point pistol and carbine might be a solution. Geoff Who notes he would not want any part of that solution pointed at him.

  • Zebra Dun

    There is a filler for every niche.
    Give me one in .357 magnum.

  • Don Ward

    I don’t get all the hate directed at this gun. And this is coming from someone who is one of the instigators here at TFB snickering at every latest gimmick designed to separate gun owners from their money.

    Yeah, it’s a Hi Point but if it reliably goes bang for each squeeze of the trigger, I’m not sure what folks are griping about for $297. Sure, this particular one is in .380 but they also come in .40 S&W, .45 ACP and 9mm, the latter being the only logical choice in terms of ballistics in a carbine. But we as gun owners aren’t all logical. And some folks like .45 or .40 or maybe that’s the only caliber of handgun they own. I don’t begrudge that. So with that same logic, having a carbine in .380 isn’t that far-fetched either.

    Personally, I think having one of these in a Plain-Jane, cheap-as-dirt Hi Point carbine in a 9mm format for a truck gun that you just keep locked behind the seat where you don’t care if it gets dinged or beat-up or as a bang-around ranch rifle on your ATV wouldn’t be a bad investment. Everyone talks about having one-off niche guns for a certain purpose in case anything inexplicable happens. And from an actuarial standpoint, it makes more sense to me having a $297 weapon in your vehicle (locked in a safe and prudent manner) with a couple extra mags and a box of ammo as your “get home” gun than your $1,500-$2,000 wunder-AR.

    • dan citizen

      Everybody talks crap about HiPoint, until they try to break one.

      • Don Ward

        Just like everyone, I know a couple guys who own Hi Points and they seem just fine. I think much of Hi Point’s image comes from the stupid redneck stuff that people do to them because they are at such a low price point.

        If this gun was offered at three times the price by a more sexy, mainstream or exotic gun company, people wouldn’t bat an eye.

        • dan citizen

          I think they’re great. If I want to leave a pistol in my truck or hunting cabin, I don’t want it to be a $700 gun.

      • Vitsaus

        …. by “try and break one” you mean take it to the range and shoot it? I’ve seen a handful of malfunctions and parts breakage, I’ve also seen a 3 gun guy who could not get one to group better than about 12 inches at 15 yards, which to me is pretty bad. The trouble with the myth around their perceived reliability is that 1. For the price a lot of guys probably just don’t care if they break, and don’t bother griping about it as they were kind of expecting it anyway, and 2. Since they are very popular in crime, you aren’t likely to hear some one say “hey this p.o.s jammed when I was doing a drive by, caviat emptor internet.”

        • dan citizen

          Have you seen moss pawn and gun’s torture tests? They put these guns through hellish abuse like 3X overloads with a bolt hammered down the barrel.

          Also, hipoints are a fixed barrel pistol and they use a good quality barrel blank, They routinely yield accuracy that is costly to get out of say a 1911, so if a “3 gun guy” can’t group 12″ at 15 feet it’s the wrong caliber for the gun, or the guy can’t shoot.

          We have a guy at our range that routinely shames $2,000 guns with a beat to snot, bone stock, HiPoint ,45

          I don’t like the guns, their ergonomics are terrible. But they are extremely sturdy, very reliable, and more accurate than 95% of shooters.

    • AC11

      Don, it appears most of the sarcasm here isn’t so much directed at the company but rather the decision to build a .380 carbine. Hate to be repetitive but the ammo cost more than 9mm with less performance than 9mm. Yes, I get it, it likely doesn’t cost Hi-Point much to build it. Still, I’d rather see them make a takedown version of a current model than this. Larger cap mags would be nice too. Or a carbine in just about any other caliber than .380.

      • Don Ward

        No. I get where you’re coming at. If you’re going to be firing thousands of rounds of ammo through this, why not buy a 9mm? It’s cheaper. Hell, why not just by an AR or AK if you can afford to fire thousands of rounds of ammo through it? And there really isn’t any reason to buy anything other than 9mm in this weapon. But that’s not the point. There are some folks who dig .45 or .40 even though they would be inferior caliber choices in this weapon. But we’re talking niche here. And (using the niche use I outlined above as an example) why NOT have this as a truck gun in a caliber that you use as a carry gun? Some folks carry .45. Some folks carry .40. I’d like to see one in .357 Magnum if that were somehow mechanically possible. I’d buy one tomorrow for the reason I outlined because that’s my carry gun of choice. But some folks feel secure enough to use .380. And if you’re going to be having this Hi Point carbine as a cheap, disposable “get home” gun, why not have it in the same caliber you already carry? Presumably you already have ammo for your carry gun. And this is not a gun (for the reasons I outlined as a far-fetched hypothetical) that you would necessarily be firing tons of ammo through anyway. Heck, there are valid reasons for having a less powerful round if – hypothetically – you have to pop a rabbit or raccoon for survival reasons.

        Or people can buy it just as a plinker and have fun shooting a .380 round for the lols. Which is what the majority of guns are used for anyway these days.

        Again, in my opinion, this is a less egregious offering than – say – that 60 box of RIP ammo that was written about elsewhere at TFB. Good talking guns with you man.

        • AC11

          Don, I never said anything about the carbine in 9mm, .40, or .45 and have no issues with those models. A better question would be WHY have this gun as a truck gun when you can have it in 9mm and save yourself money AND acquire better ballistic performance. That’s also the same answer to “why not have it in the same caliber you already carry?” and using it for plinking.

          Also, the carbine is better than 6 pounds. If one does not feel secure enough to shoot 9mm out of it they must be a dwarf.

          About the only reason I can see buying this is to have something in a less popular caliber so if there is another bull-market in ammo like there was in 2013 your chances of finding ammo is a little better.

          I’m with you on a .357 version (mag or sig). 10mm and .38 Super would be nice also.

          • screwtape2713 .

            I think Don already answered your “why” question: If you are the type of person who is firing thousands of rounds through his gun, then buying one in the calibre where the ammo is cheapest in bulk makes good sense. But if you are the kind of person who fires thousands of rounds through a gun, you are not part of Hi-Point’s true target market demographic in the first place.

            On the other hand, if you are the kind of person who just wants a gun for personal defence and maybe something a little bigger (and more intimidating) for home defence – then this might be just the ticket for you. For someone who doesn’t shoot a lot and/or has medical issues, maybe .380ACP is a calibre they feel comfortable shooting and can shoot WELL when they do shoot it.

            For someone like that – who carries a .380 pistol or has one in the nightstand, a PCC in the same calibre (and possibly even using the same mags) might be just the ticket.

            And if the ammo costs a tiny bit more a box, who cares if you’re only buying half a dozen boxes per year (if that)…

          • John Pryce

            These things are built for hot loads, 10mm would be amazing.

  • FightFireJay

    This will sell for 2 (possibly 3 reasons) reasons…
    – It’s the ONLY .380 acp carbine I’ve ever heard of, cornered the market!
    – It’s a Hi Point! A polarizing gun, I hate them but they seem to be reliable with a cult following.
    – (the possible reason, as stated below) Caliber restrictions. I bet some areas (brazil maybe?) that can’t have 9mm and can have .380 would like this product. IF they can get it imported.

  • Brian M

    It’s an affordable, reliable PCC that comes at price poinly only matched by 91/30 — what more do you want? Sounds like a potential good HD gun with plenty of utility as a toy.

  • gunslinger

    wow… such forum.. much posts.

    for 300 bucks.. if you already own HP pistols. or well even 380s.

    will we see true delta seals operators with this? probably not. but the gun industry has a crapton of stuff for small niches of people.

    now if HP made a shotgun (do they?) i’d love to see a HP at a 3gun. even better if it actually did well 😉

  • Ko I

    I’m torn on this one. I started off, years ago, with the goal of owning a PCC in every major handgun caliber. The only other real option is a used Cobray, and Cobrays are really really bad. But, I really don’t want another Hi-Point carbine. Been there, done that, upgraded to something far far better.

  • Overthetop

    I don’t have any experience with suppressors, but what would this sound like with a can? Would the .380 be similar to a suppressed .22lr? ie would the sound basically be the action cycling?

  • Mike

    Hats off to them for doing something different AND that is affordable. Now how about a 10mm, 7.62×25, 5.7x27mm or 357

    • AC11

      There’s a reason why no one else makes a .380 carbine. Being different and affordable doesn’t equal smart.

  • Mark Holcomb

    Think the old 32 Winchester lever action and limited utility is why they quit making in the 1930s, too. A Ruger 10-22 with BX-25 magazines and Viper ammo is probably a superior choice for home defense. Ballistically, a G2 CMR-30 and PMR-30 in .22 WMR make better sense, as 22 WMR is a baby deer rifle round, indeed.

  • Tarkay1990

    When is high point going to introduce clips that are at least twenty or thirty rounds for the 9mm, .40 and .45?

    • miamimike

      Look 4 miamimike comment posted 3-29-15 @ 6:10 pm

  • Tarkay1990

    .380 is going to be more expensive and not that much less of recoil to justify.

  • Alucard

    Didn’t kaboom yet,just because some idiot did it and didn’t get injured from his stupid decision doesn’t mean others won’t

  • SNNNN

    I have owned two of Hi-Points 9mm carbines over the years. Both were the older
    style no rail “planet of the apes” kinda stocks. Both did what was expected. If you
    look at these as semi-auto Sten guns…beater weapons you will not cry over if
    you break….its all good. Yeah…fully agree the mag’s could be better but the
    pro-mag I got with my second one was functional. Nice to have a carbine I
    could shoot at an indoor range to 😎

  • Jamie Clemons

    I suppose it would be a fun toy for someone who already had a .380 and wanted a carbine in the same caliber or already had the other carbines and wanted yet another one to add to their collection. But it would not be my first choice.

    • AC11

      And not anyone’s first choice. If Hi-Point placed a poll on their website a year ago asking the public to pick the caliber of the next Hi-Point carbine and they listed .380 and say nine other calibers I’d bet .380 wouldn’t be in the top five.

  • maodeedee

    When are they going to make Hi-caps for ANY of these guns? I’d have bought one years ago in both 9mm and 45 if they came with a reliable HiCap mag, possibly even a drum mag. Given the ballistics of the 380, 20 or 30 rounds could make up for fewer foot-pounds per round on target.

  • jim

    I think the 380 is a great idea, I dont give a darn about how effective the round is. I have a Thunder 380 that I love and i reload the round so this is perfect, if i had a 9mm than I would be interested in the 380

  • jim

    should have put wouldn’t not would

  • screwtape2713 .

    Of course, what everybody seems to forget is that this is a forum for firearms ENTHUSIASTS — which means that ‘everybody’ commenting here is pretty much outside Hi-Point’s target market demographic both for this .380ACP carbine and for most of their other offerings.

    This all reminds me of the discussions you get about late-19th century to early-20th century firearms. To hear people talking or writing on forums and in gun magazines (or even reading the gun writers of the period), you would think that everybody in the Old West (or in Eastern American cities in the same period) carried either a Colt SAA, a Smith & Wesson Russian or Schofield, a Remington 1875 or 1890, or later a Colt or S&W swing-out cylinder double-action revolver. And they were all chambered in a “serious” calibre like .45LC, .44Russian, .44-40 or later .38Spl.

    In fact, up until about WW2, if you were an urban civilian who just wanted a pistol for protection to leave under your store counter by the cash register or in your nightstand at home or to carry in a coat pocket while walking the streets, the gun you had was most probably a small revolver chambered for a relatively light .32 or .38 cartridge.

    For every Colt SAA or S&W Russian or New Century sold in a “serious” calibre, companies like Forehand & Wadsworth, Iver Johnson, or the anonymous Belgians in Liege sold between 10 and 100 chambered in the “little” calibres. Even looking at later S&W M&P revolvers, for every one you see in .38Spl, you find at least two in .38S&W or .32S&W (and even more when you take the ones with military or police markings out of the count and just look at completely civilian ones).

    And THAT’S the market that Hi-Point is aiming for today — the “casual” users who just want a pistol for self-protection and perhaps the occasional trips to the range, but who are most unlikely to fire 1000 rounds out of it in their lifetime, never mind in a year. And – for this .380 PCC – who may want a slightly bigger and more intimidating gun specifically for home defence (and maybe for occasional carry on an ATV or something) and would find it handy if it used the same ammo as their pistol. And, again, would like it to be cheap and reliable for ‘non high-voume’ use…

    • AC11

      The problem with this argument is compared to Hi-Point’s 9mm carbine this carbine in .380 is more expensive to own since the ammo costs more and is no more reliable not to mention the lesser performance of the cartridge itself.