Steyr SSG 69 Being Retired

ssg693

Steyr’s SSG 69 has been in service since 1969, and after more than four decades as the sniper rifle relied upon by the Austrian Army and many in the law enforcement world, it’s being retired. When the SSG 69 was first made it was considered quite advanced for the era with a cold hammer-forged barrel and synthetic components, and it wasn’t long before it gained a reputation based on its fine accuracy rather than simply on how it was made.While there have been multiple variants produced over the years the differences between rifles has been mostly, although not entirely, cosmetic. One of the gun’s most interesting features is its 5-round detachable box magazine which feeds in a rotary fashion and the back of which is transparent so you can see how many rounds you have left. A 10-round box magazine is also available but is rather hard to find at this point, so when you do find them they tend to be on the expensive side.

Why Steyr Arms is retiring a rifle that’s still in fairly high demand is not known, but this is one gun that’s going to be missed.

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The final 1,000 SSG 69 rifles made are apparently being sold by CDNN Sports in Abilene, Texas. Those thousand are a combination of the dozen variations produced over the years and are available with either single or double triggers. Each rifle comes with a factory mounted 20 MOA Picatinny rail. If you’re interested in getting one of these before they’re gone, call CDNN Sports at 1-800-588-9500. Current MSRP is listed at $1500.

Take a look at Steyr’s website, where you’ll notice the SSG 69 PI is already listed as no longer available: http://www.steyrarms.com/products/sporting-rifles/steyr-ssg-69/ And if you’d like to take a look at a review of the SSG 69 PI, head over to Sniper Central: http://www.snipercentral.com/ssgp1.htm



katie.ainsworth

Katie is an avid shooter, hunter, military journalist, and Southern girl. Firearms are her passion whether at the range or on a spot-and-stalk after a big buck. She’s a staff writer at The Firearm Blog and writes about guns, hunting, and the military for various publications both online and in print such as Outdoor Life, Handguns, and Shooting Illustrated. Shoot her a message at ainsworth.kat@usa.com


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  • William Johnson

    I have always wanted one of these ever since Jeff Cooper wrote a review when I was a kid.

  • Renegade

    You couldn’t have published this article on Saturday, before I went to the gun show, could you?

  • iksnilol

    Why are they discontinuing it if it is still in demand? Makes no sense to me.

    • AMX

      I suspect the tooling is worn out, and the demand is not high enough to justify refurbushing the production line.

      Note that both the bolt and the magazine are now exclusive to the SSG 69 – all other rifles that used them have been replaced by the SBS 96, which is itself “old news” (new models are built on the SM 12).

      • iksnilol

        Makes sense I guess, it isn’t like that they don’t make other sniper rifles (like the SSG 08 which seems like the replacement for it).

  • Bill

    It’s still quite advanced, and will outshoot many of the people who shoot them. They may not be tacti-sexy anymore, but they put bullets exactly where they were supposed to go, and in the end, that’s all that counts. I’m surprised they aren’t priced higher, but IIRC the mags are over a bill a piece.

  • Jake Barnes

    The clear window on the back of the magazines has a horrible habit of cracking.

  • Michael A

    I’ve owned one with the 6X Kahles scope since the mid 70’s. The first thing I wanted to do was ditch the crappy European post reticle—-until I shot it. I’ve taken it to 500 meters with Federal Match ammo and it is sub-moa at that distance which is hard to believe with that power and reticle combo—it is definitely a keeper.

  • West

    Weird, I grew up in Abilene.

  • idahoguy101

    Good news if you own one! The value just went way up