Colt Factory to Become National Park

colt-national-park-dbe996772232223a

The Associated Press is reporting that the original Colt factory in Hartford, Connecticut is to become a national park. Hailed as the result of a “decade-long push,” the factory, active until 1994, included “armories, buildings for worker housing, and an Episcopal church Elizabeth Colt commissioned in her husband’s honor following his death. The Church of the Good Shepherd features revolver parts carved into sandstone above one of the entrances and, at the rear, stained glass with a rendering of Samuel Colt in flowing robes.”

In this Dec. 17, 2014 photo, a stained glass window depicting Samuel Colt is seen inside the Church of the Good Shepherd, which was built by the widow of Samuel Colt, in Hartford, Conn. As the decade-long push to make a national park out of Colt's now-closed gun factory and other buildings in Coltsville won approval in Washington, elected officials hailed the project as a way to boost one of Hartford's poorest neighborhoods and honor the revolver as a marvel of manufacturing. Notably absent was Colt's Manufacturing Co. _ the company that, somewhat uncomfortably, remains based today in a state still reeling from the Newtown shootings and now sporting some of the nation's strictest gun laws. (AP Photo/Michael Melia) Caption from AP.

In this Dec. 17, 2014 photo, a stained glass window depicting Samuel Colt is seen inside the Church of the Good Shepherd, which was built by the widow of Samuel Colt, in Hartford, Conn. As the decade-long push to make a national park out of Colt’s now-closed gun factory and other buildings in Coltsville won approval in Washington, elected officials hailed the project as a way to boost one of Hartford’s poorest neighborhoods and honor the revolver as a marvel of manufacturing. Notably absent was Colt’s Manufacturing Co. _ the company that, somewhat uncomfortably, remains based today in a state still reeling from the Newtown shootings and now sporting some of the nation’s strictest gun laws. (AP Photo/Michael Melia)
Caption from AP.

Key take-aways:

The factory, distinguished by its blue onion-shaped dome, opened in 1855 and is perhaps the best-known symbol of an era when gun companies in the Connecticut River valley helped to pioneer the concept of interchangeable parts and drive the Industrial Revolution.

The measure designating Coltsville as a national park was signed into law Friday (December 19, 2014) by President Barack Obama. It is expected to bring in millions of dollars and, eventually, 200,000 visitors annually. A proposal describes possible attractions including a “Colt manufacturing multimedia experience.”

You can read the full article here. 

Note*- Article head image credit to AP/Bob Child.

In this Dec. 17, 2014 photo, a blue onion-shaped dome sits atop Samuel Colt's 19th century gun factory in Hartford, Conn., and is perhaps the best known symbol of a bygone era. As the decade-long push to make a national park out of the now-closed gun factory won approval in Washington, elected officials hailed the project as a way to boost one of Hartford's poorest neighborhoods and honor the revolver as a marvel of manufacturing. Notably absent was Colt's Manufacturing Co. _ the company that, somewhat uncomfortably, remains based today in a state still reeling from the Newtown shootings and now sporting some of the nation's strictest gun laws. (AP Photo/Michael Melia) Caption from AP

In this Dec. 17, 2014 photo, a blue onion-shaped dome sits atop Samuel Colt’s 19th century gun factory in Hartford, Conn., and is perhaps the best known symbol of a bygone era. As the decade-long push to make a national park out of the now-closed gun factory won approval in Washington, elected officials hailed the project as a way to boost one of Hartford’s poorest neighborhoods and honor the revolver as a marvel of manufacturing. Notably absent was Colt’s Manufacturing Co. _ the company that, somewhat uncomfortably, remains based today in a state still reeling from the Newtown shootings and now sporting some of the nation’s strictest gun laws. (AP Photo/Michael Melia)
Caption from AP



Nathan S.

One of TFB’s resident Jarheads, Nathan now works within the firearms industry. A consecutive Marine rifle and pistol expert, he enjoys local 3-gun, NFA, gunsmithing, MSR’s, & high-speed gear. Nathan has traveled to over 30 countries working with US DoD & foreign MoDs.

Nathan can be reached at Nathan.S@TheFirearmBlog.com

The above post is my opinion and does not reflect the views of any company or organization.


Advertisement

  • noob

    so the historic buildings will be preserved with federal money?

  • Thomas

    Glad to see this great landmark of American history and manufacturing being memorized.

    • sauerquint

      Memorialized too.

  • Burt Maclin

    This is actually quite sad. National Park status means one of histories most famous firearm factories is now a Gun-Free Zone.

    • Collin C.

      That statement is completely false. Thanks for spreading misinformation. The damage is done, however. 15 people have already upvoted it, probably because it’s what they want to believe.

      • claymore

        So you live there? BTW it is actually a VERY dangerous area after dark when the creatures come out.

        • Collin C.

          No, I do not live there. I mean that National Park status does not make it a “gun-free zone.” Since 2010, concealed carry has been permitted in National Parks. This isn’t even an NP though, it’s an NHP.

          • Yellow Devil

            I believe that law is dependent of the state where the National Park resides in. So a park in AZ, yes, but in CT, no(?) (I’m unfamiliar with CT gun laws).

          • Collin C.

            That’s a good question, but no – the new federal law which took effect in 2010 permits firearms in all national parks.

      • Burt Maclin

        Yes, it is true you can carry firearms into National [Historical] Parks (local laws permitting). However, this only applies to the OUTSIDE, not the buildings in the park that are considered Federal property like offices and visitors centers. Coltsville is mostly building.

        The original blurb here only said “National Park” and never differentiated between the two, so I guess I learned something new today. Besides, the major difference between National Park and National Historic Park seems to be that the Historic variety CAN be privately owned. It will ultimately depend on weather Coltsville will be privately held or not, the article didn’t make that clear. Even then they might not permit them, just like when it was a factory.

  • aweds1

    Oh, the irony. The state of CT will gladly take the tax revenue generated by tourists to this historic landmark, but can a resident buy a new Colt 6920?

  • Collin C.

    Coltsville is not a National Park, it is a National Historical Park. There is a significant difference. The 59 National Parks (ie. Yosemite, Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, Acadia) are protected natural wonders, usually spanning large areas. The 49 National Historical Parks are sites of historical importance to the United States.

  • Don Ward

    Instead of face painting, you and the kids get to hand assemble left-over revolvers parts.

    • Cymond

      Dude, I would *totally* sign up for that!

  • kirill

    Speaking as a person who works mere blocks from the factory, its about damned time. The state of the building is absolutely miserable, heres hoping it gets repaired.

  • click bait

    Uh, national parks are not gun free zones.

    • Uncle Fester

      At one time, I drove past the Winchester, Marlin, and Colt to plants on the way to work. Sad they are all closed.

  • Hikerguy

    Epitaph.

  • Geoff a well known Skeptic

    Let me guess, smack dab in the middle of a Welfare Island with all the associated crime and corruption. Geoff Who notes Federal Money is not unlimited, despite what the politicians say when buying votes with it.