Covered 6 Savior PDS

savior

Training and security company Covered 6 makes a portable armor shield called the Savior PDS (personal defense shield.) The Savior folds to resemble a briefcase or tote bag.

savior

When folded it can even be used to carry your pistol or other item(s). When unfolded, the Savior forms a torso-length ballistic shield capable of stopping handgun and shotgun rounds. The Covered 6 Savior PDS weighs about five pounds.

This type of shield could be used in a variety of situations from people needing additional protection outside of their home due to special risks, home owners to keep at the bedside or even office workers who keep one at their desk due to concerns about spree killers or other specific threats.

The Savior reminds me of the rig that Eric S. set up at ITS Tactical with old ballistic vests.



Richard Johnson

An advocate of gun proliferation zones, Richard is a long time shooter, former cop and internet entrepreneur. Among the many places he calls home is http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/.


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  • Pete Sheppard

    The product is ingenious, but it’s hard to see how effective it can be, basically hanging from its strap as shown in the first photo. It seems that a bullet would just push it aside, with minimal deflection.

    • Swiss Rat

      Exactly, what you said and :
      -No picture of the 2.3/4 28gr slug afterwards
      – staged firing squad scene then let’s show a shield for each caliber.
      – No 10mm, 7.62tok, 9mm outta 10+inches barrel, 12ga 3″ 36gr brenneke slug nor .223/5.56 ballistic test

      -Ballistic test is done by fixing it on a pole znd assuming residual energy won’t hurt the user…

      I WANT TO BELIEVE

      • Alucard

        I wanted to believe too,but Mulder and Scully couldn’t convince me.

  • Nicks87

    Looks gimmicky to me. They are assuming that the bad guy is going shoot at the shield when in reality they will probably just shoot around it. I could see it being used in a personal protection role to help protect the principle when caught out in the open without any kind of cover but still too many “what ifs” to depend on it.

  • Bill

    Back in the day, whenever that was, Rich Davis at Second Chance made a fanny pack sort of thing that contained a pistol and folded soft armor that was pulled out, up and hung around the users’ neck. I don’t think many were sold.

    These kinds of devices have a real role when they can be prepositioned in places like schools and workplaces. A small, light shield that can be deployed from the equivalent of a fire extinguisher or AED cabinet beats a large, heavy ballistic shield that’s back in the storeroom at the police department

    • JumpIf NotZero

      Yea, that kind of sounds like a scenario that has never actually happened.

    • Don Ward

      As a pro tip. When gun people talk about giving kids “bullet proof” back packs in hopes of thwarting school shooters, we automatically lose the political argument.

    • Sulaco

      This^ Thank you Bill I knew I had not miss remembered about that! I am also sure I have seen it ‘reinvented” recently some where.

  • echelon

    Say a bullet hits the shield right where your forearm is supporting it…how’s that gonna feel?

    It’s a neat idea, but nothing I bet my life on.

    • JumpIf NotZero

      Will probably feel better than a bullet directly into your arm.

      The idea they are pushing is “prevent death” not a luxury spa day.

      • Vitsaus

        …. right, and I suppose “doing more push ups” will also help you cope with an instantly shattered arm too… If your bones are broken, you won’t be able to hold the thing up regardless of your superhuman operator will power. Basically its good for one block MAYBE. After that, your arm is down, and you’re wide open again. That is assuming that while fumbling around with this thing you also manage to bring your pistol up (with one hand) and aim it properly all before the attacker gets a second shot off….

        • JumpIf NotZero

          What part of prevent death are you not comprehending?

          Maybe this has use for someone, I don’t know. I’ll probably just run my ass off. I’m not sure why you are concerned with maybe a broken arm (unlikely) when the alternative is best a hole.

          Although I suspect for you, you should probably walk around with a full ballisitc shield and always move with a team. Cool, whatever.

        • skusmc

          A 115 grain (.262oz) 9mm round travels at about 1300 fps. That’s roughly the same energy as a 5oz baseball traveling at 68fps (46 mph).

          Where im from, you don’t have to be a leet operator to catch a 48 mph ball.

          • Sulaco

            Concentration of energy. A fast ball will leave a bruse, a FMJ 9mm will punch through you and the guy behind you. That’s the diff.

          • skusmc

            Well, technically, yes it’s the concentration of energy that makes a firearm projectile deadly. But the entire purpose of bullet resistant armor is to de-concentrate it. The force would be spread out over the area of the plate, which would be essentially harmless from a 9mm round. It looks like the plates are about 12″x12″, so the concentration of energy would be even less than the aforementioned baseball.

          • Sulaco

            Maybe, but vest worn on torso are backed up by being secured
            in place with wide straps, over a large support structure (ribs) which is paramount for distributing the energy of the bullet. This held up by one hand, out of any semblance of balance or support over laying a forearm is asking for the entire rig to be ripped out of your hand. Impacts on the forearm even through the held up barrier would be extremely painful. Vest impacts by slugs HURTS I know…even on well-padded and secured torso vests.

        • Bill

          A lot better than if that bullet penetrates your chest. People give WAY too much credit for the amount of energy the typical round dumps into a target. Newton’s 3rd law still is in play, even with differences in mass and velocity. I’ve seen the after effects of getting shot in the vest and it’s typically a really colorful bruise. I’d expect even less damage when a flexible object like a bullet blanket and an arm get hit. It isnt going to shatter an arm, unless you’ve got one hell of a calcium deficiency.

          ANYTHING that slows down or stops a bullet is better than than nothing. I’ve seen far dumber stuff getting foisted off on cops and the public.

          • Sulaco

            It seems to me that I have seen items like this being sold for the last couple of years but the one I saw was designed to be unfolded and draped over the check by a strap. Which would seem to me to be much more “tactical” and probably more effective then trying to hold up a shield with one arm and trying to shoot back with the other…

        • Ian Thorne

          And an arm with a bullet hole with torn muscle/ligaments is better than fractured arm?

          BTW during stress people have done things much more impressive than lifting a 5 pound weight with broken bones and worse injuries. Maybe you don’t have the capacity to do it, but don’t discount others.

      • echelon

        Prevent death how? Take a shot to the arm covered with shield, forearm shatters, you drop to the ground in pain, bad guy stands over you writhing on the ground in pain, puts bullet in your head.

        I’d rather take my chances with a shot directly into my arm…

        • JumpIf NotZero

          No, and I think you’re dragging this site down with your nonsense.

          • echelon

            What nonsense would that be?

            Please enlighten us all.

        • Ian Thorne

          What you just said is pure garbage. And any one who says they would rather be shot than have a bullet proof covering stop it is a moron. Do you really think the blunt impact is going to hurt more than getting shot? Either way you will be in a lot of pain, only one of those ways will you risk bleeding out. If a blunt force is going to shatter your arm, the bullet going through the same place will shatter it as well.

          Get a clue kid.

          • echelon

            I love being called a kid by people who don’t know me on the interwebs.

            Many times actual bullet wounds, even if they break bones, result in different kinds of force trauma and physical reactions than blunt force trauma. The body responds to those types of injuries different ways.

            I could cite many reports of people taking multiple gun shots to the torso and extremities and still either fight or flee and in contrast people who take a beer bottle to the noggin or a baseball bat to the leg or arm and they are down for the count.

            I personally wouldn’t like to be shot at in any capacity if I can help it, but that also doesn’t mean that I’m going to want to ever put a product like this “shield” to the test either to see which has the better outcome.

            How about we ask police and armed forces to start carrying these and use these as SOP and collect data on the outcomes of its’ usage.

            Then maybe we’ll both get a clue.

          • Ian Thorne

            Then don’t act like a child. I can only respond based on what you said, and you said a childishly stupid thing.

            I can show you guys that take a single .22lr and go down and people who take a beating and keep moving(look at boxers and martial artists, where are you professional bullet catchers?). So, yeah, that’s pointless. Anecdotal evidence can be used to prove anything. But to think that a blunt trauma will ever be worse than the penetrative trauma caused by a bullet is just dumb.

            This isn’t supposed to replace the body armor that real operators use, don’t make that stupid comparison. This is supposed to be a step above nothing, not an armor replacement. Seems you don’t even understand the intent of the item. Makes it hard to have an intelligent opinion.

          • echelon

            I think my observations were perfectly within the bounds of rational questioning.

            And like my anecdotal evidence your assumptions that penetrative trauma will always be worse than blunt trauma is the same. Speculative at best.

            If this product is supposed to be a rational step above nothing then the creators have a long ways to go to prove that it is in fact that.

            Everyone wants to debate issues such as CC vs OC and holster retention types, gun types, ad nauseum to make a point about what is better situationally in a gunfight and now you’re here telling me that I don’t have an intelligent opinion when it comes to a freaking bag that is supposed to be deployed as a “better than nothing” solution to an armed attacker? And I’m the child?

            Ok…bro.

        • Bill

          Good luck with that.

          Seriously, you think your forearms would shatter? Why doesn’t it shatter each time your own gun recoils?

          • echelon

            Guys get broken ribs and other internal organ damage all the time when they take a shot with a vest on…why would I not assume that a direct shot to the hand, forearm or wrist would not sustain some other sort of impact related damage.

            To equate the energy of a recoiling gun with the energy on the other side of the fired bullet is just…well not an adequate equation if you ask me.

          • Bill

            A bruise is a far cry from a shattered forearm. And they don’t get “internal organ damage” beyond bruising with modern armor that is rated for the round fired at it. This has been researched to literal death – study up on the NIJ standards for armor.

            I’ll pass on your doubts about physics to the ghost of Sir Isaac Newton

          • echelon

            I can agree with what you’re saying but you are assuming that the person getting shot is getting shot with the “proper” round for the armor, which may not be the case.

            There are many factors that come into play.

            My main point, which I feel has gotten completely ripped out of it’s context at this point, is that just taking one look at the picture in the article and seeing how you have to hold that “shield” I’d rather pass on having it altogether and take may chances. I’d rather have two hands on my gun, etc.

            And yes, if given the option, I’d much rather have body armor and pray that the guy shooting me is using the “proper” bullet…

  • John Yossarian

    Or you can just put a bullet-proof vest on both the bodyguard and the principal?

    • Nicks87

      Lol yeah but some of those guys refuse to wear vests believe it or not, too uncomfortable, doesnt match their $3000 suit, whatever the reason. A guy told me once “I dont need a vest, that’s why I hired you guys”.

      • John Yossarian

        But that leaves open for you to just tell your next client, “It wasn’t my fault; I’d told him to wear a vest!”

        • Nicks87

          I dont do protection work anymore but if I ever do I will say, “it wasnt my fault I told him to carry a Savior PDS” lol.

    • noob

      yes you can put a vest on the guard, the principal, the dog, and get a bullet proof bag and a bullet proof car.

      if you are rich enough and can carry it easily, why not?

  • Don Ward

    I’m glad someone is FINALLY putting out a product that is needed for everyday, real-life situations we all face, like escorting Third World dictators or Drug Lords who are fearful of being assassinated.

    • Bill

      I’m guessing the market is for guys like me who are either in investigations, training or administration, where we might not wear a vest as often as the troops on the road. Depending on the threat level, it may also make a decent adjunct to soft body armor when a ballistic shield isn’t available. There’s also a larger version that was on the market for use in rescuing downed officers that could cover a litter team or side of a cruiser.

      • Don Ward

        If I’m working someplace where I need a bulletproof briefcase in order to thwart a “spree shooting” I’m quitting and not bothering to give my two weeks.

        • Hi Don,

          It’s not my intention to be confrontational, but I’m not sure where you might work where a spree killer would never strike. Post offices, churches, newspapers, schools, police stations, government buildings, construction sites, hospitals and military bases are all places that have had one or more people show up with firearms to kill large numbers of people. These horrific acts have happened all around the globe and are not confined to the USA.

          I agree with the concept of not putting yourself into an unnecessarily dangerous position, but life if both unpredictable and dangerous. Evil can find us in even the most peaceful of places.

          Best,

          Richard

          • Nicks87

            I agree but this product is not a solution to dealing with active shooters and at $800 a pop you could buy yourself some pretty nice body armor that would offer more protection and mobility than this bullet proof yoga mat does.

          • Oh, I’m neither advocating for or against the product. I merely wished to highlight that really bad things can happen anywhere.

          • Sulaco

            Or you could by a second hand vest and place the panel/s in your brief case…….

          • Don Ward

            No worries man. I’ve worked as a newspaper reporter. And I was even a contributor to our local alt weekly that made the news a while back for having another contributor go into hiding after staging the Draw Mohammed stunt which stirred up Haji. If someone is really coming after you, I don’t see how the ballistic briefcase is going to help. Not in a 9-5 work scenario. Additionally, every newspaper I know of frowns on this sort of thing. As I mentioned, this product seems geared to high-risk targets with body guards.

          • Bill

            Frowns on it? Only network news correspondents get the blue armor with the “media” placard, sometimes referred to as the “Take Me Hostage’ sign?

          • Don Ward

            I meant to the office. But yes, you have a point.

      • Nicks87

        Lol this most definately does not take the place of a ballistic shield. Its just as easy to have a plate carrier or soft body armor in a bag or a locker or the trunk of your vehicle ready to put on at a moments notice. A vest/carrier also offers more mobility and better protection of your vital areas.

        • Bill

          Interestingly enough, there is soft body armor, a plate carrier and plates, and a chest rig all in the trunk of my car. While they undoubtedly beat this for general use, they don’t go on “at a moments notice.” There’s 14 square yards of velcro and 8 pounds of zippers and snaps to fight with to get it to fit right. When it’s time to serve a warrant or go track somebody down I can take a few minutes to make sure that it’s squared away.

          I don’t think this is being marketed as a replacement for properly -fitting armor, any more than that seat cushion that can be used as a flotation device is meant to be a replacement for a Coast Guard approved life jacket.

          I never thought I’d hear people rag on armor, unless it involved duct-taping a ceramic plate to your own back,

          • Sulaco

            Ding Ding Ding, we have found a new product!!!

          • Bill

            Watching me trying to get all my kit on is like watching an octopus rape a gorilla.

            I don’t even bother trying to change into BDUs in the back of a cruiser, I quit dressing in cars after high school after an unfortunate incident in which I was almost inadvertently strangled with a bra, thus inventing autoerotic asphyxiation.

          • Sulaco

            Agreed. I never carried assault armor just the standard patrol armor which can be swung up and on in seconds….still the mental image of strapping ceramic plates to your chest with duct tape makes me giggle.

          • Nicks87

            I just have a plate carrier with loaded mag pouches, a blow out kit and an extra flashlight in the back of my SUV. It goes on pretty quick with one click buckle and a velcro cumberbund.

  • DAN V.

    Well, now the man purse makes you the primary target. Seems like it takes at least two “shakes” to deploy the thing.

  • Gecko45

    This seems be a perfect setup for covert members of Retail Area Rapid Tactical Force, as it is capable of concealing equipment like PDW in 300BLK and gas grenades necessary for coping with various scenarios of high risk engagement that are so common nowadays. However I would advise them to procure also a slightly longer model that would accommodate also a high power long range precision rifle like NEF 300 WinMag for designated marksman in RTF team. To those who are wondering about the usefulness of this type of gear: of course tactical bulletproof shield requires trained operator with finely honed skills to be deployed properly and effectively. I remember that back in a day in my RTF we had a pointman that was a former amateur wrestler, man of both quick reflexes and immense strength build on applying expertise diet based on natural high protein products like chickenwings, slim jims and soya sauce. This man was so effective, that during one firefight he saved lives of two of his teammates that were positioned right behind him. Long bursts from full auto AK-47 wielded by korean member of local yakuza hit his shield and spun him so fast that the last bullets hit his back which, luckily, was covered by armor plate ducktaped to a camelbak. We then drop the perp with precise shot through his unarmored forehead, and his girlfriend, who along with him tried to rob a Casio dealership, immediately surrendered. Our man was a hero of the day and to this very day we send him postcards, sweets, stuffed animals, which he enjoys much, judging his eye movements. What I meant is that you have to choose right person as a shield bearer. A 5 foot tall girl wont do. Perhaps if she would be an 300 lbs gal, then you would have a chance, at least vertically. But it better be a tall, strong and exceptionally built guy, and one with unshaken commitment to his service. Luckily we have them aplenty, so civilians can sleep peacefully.

    • Don Ward

      True story. *raises coffee mug*

      • Bill

        Reminds me of the time I had to HALO into a Chik-Fil-A cause they were inserting sleeper agents into Cinnabon to do Bad Things in the icing. After whacking the tangos, during the exfil the V22 caught a rotor tip on an ear-piercing cart and we had to use a couple white phosphorous grenades on the wreckage so the guys from Radio Shack couldn’t heist the new, top-secret hall-following radar

    • Phillip Cooper

      Too long, didn’t read…

    • noob

      I remember this! Oh god it’s a blast from the past.

      wait I know the next line – “if your plan involves taking rounds into your plate you need a better plan”

      or something.

    • Bill

      I’m working on an armored Segway for doing PIT maneuvers on skateboarders

      • Don Ward

        Also known as the BEST YOUTUBE CHANNEL EVAH!

  • tony

    Is it water resistant? What is its shelf life?

    • noob

      good question. some bulletproof fabrics swell with water absorption and become less effective.

      at least as a bag you won’t be sweating into it all the time.

  • Phillip Cooper

    Seriously, has anyone ever been dumb enough to try actually holding this while it’s being fired on?

  • noob

    good to see this concept evolving. I wonder what the next refinement will be?

    there is also the

    ELSA (Emergency Life Saving Armor) by Martinson Industries LLC that features molle attachment points inside a briefcase that turns into a vest.

    and the Duffel Vest Conversion Bag (DVCB) by Rogue Warrior

    maybe the next iteration would be a car seat cover that becomes a soft ballistic shield you can rip off your car and run with?

    • noob

      also Zahal Israeli Tactical Gear is selling a very similar product called the Bond Bulletproof Briefcase

  • dan citizen

    I’ve got one of the Second Chance COP fanny packs. This one looks a little more discrete.

  • Pete Sheppard

    It’s been several years, but I remember reading a review of a similar device that had a neck strap so the user could ‘wear’ it and incidentally free up both hands. Also, it seems that by resting against the body, the panel would be more effective, since the user’s body would stabilize it.

  • TZH .

    Got a question for everybody: What do you think if someday this becomes cheap enough for everybody to have on their daily work-bags? How would society be affected if everyone had access to affordable bullet-proof wear?

    —————————————-

    A bullet proof shield gives you options. Sure you’ll break a few bones from behind this thing while getting shot, but I’m sure a lot of guys who actually got holes in their bodies from an ambush would wish they had one of these.

    I think its better to have an increased chance of survival than none at all. Even if the improvement is a tiny one, many guys would take it.

    Options baby. I like that. Now lets wait for the smaller, stronger, and cheaper version.