Derya Mk-10 AR-Style Shotgun

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One of the more unique firearms I came across during SHOT Show this year was from Turkish firearms company Derya Silah Sanayi, or Derya Hunting Arms. The new, patented Derya Mk-10 AR-style semi-auto shotguns present very interesting additions to the shotgun market, especially for law enforcement, military, or self-defense applications.

The receivers of the Derya Mk-10 AR-style shotgun match their Mk-10 shotgun with an AR-style lower receiver.

The Derya Mk-10 AR-style shotgun combines their Mk-10 shotgun with an AR-style lower.

The Derya Mk-10 AR-style shotguns (VR-100 and VR-101) have a 6-position collapsible stock, that also has a complete 180-degree folding option as well. The lower receiver is very similar to an AR-10 lower receiver complete with similar AR-style controls.The upper receiver; however, is a modification of Derya’s previous Mk-10 shotgun receiver. In this combination the Derya appears to be much different than other AR-shotguns that have taken a more AR-style and appearance.

This is the collapsible stock option with the addition of a foldable option as well.

This is the collapsible stock option with the addition of a foldable option as well.

The fixed stock option has a similarly shaped buttstock as the collapsible version, but is one solid piece.

The fixed stock has a similarly shaped buttstock as the collapsible, but is one solid piece.

The Derya collapsible stock is released by two button levers at the joint.

The Derya folding stock is released by two button levers at the joint. It reaches a 180-degree fold through the articulating elbow.

The lower receiver is very similar to AR-style receivers, with only slight modifications.

The lower receiver is very similar to AR-style receivers, with only slight modifications.

The pistol grip is an A2-style grip, though slightly different on the front grip design. Manual safety, magazine release lever, and trigger system are all very similar to AR-style weapon systems. The charging handle is attached to the bolt and is manually locked open and released. The top receiver has a full-length Picatinny style rail for easy installation of optional optics and accessories.

The trigger group, magazine well, magazine release, and pistol grip.

The trigger group, magazine well, magazine release, and pistol grip.

The lower receiver is very similar to AR-style receivers, with only slight modifications.

The lower receiver is very similar to AR-style receivers, with only slight modifications.

The A2 style detachable front sight, and choke style muzzle device.

The A2 style detachable front sight, choke style muzzle device, and full-length Picatinny rail.

The Derya Mk-10 VR-100 Specifications:

  • Model VR-100 – Tactical polymer handguard, with bird case flash suppressor
  • Model VR-101 – Traditional style polymer hand guard with small Picatinny bottom rail, muzzle brake style with breaching crown head
  • Overall Length – (Approximate) 40″ extended, 37″ collapsed, ” folded (official measurements were not provided on the SHOT floor)
  • Barrel Length – 18.5″ (470 mm) or 20.0″ (500 mm)
  • Height – Not released at SHOT
  • Weight – 8.38 lbs. (3.8 kg) unloaded)
  • Gauge – 12 gauge only
  • Chamber – 3″ (accepts 2.75″ and 3″ shells)
  • Chokes – Choke with silencer (not suppressor), compatible with Beretta and Benelli chokes
  • Action – Semi-auto, gas pressure system
  • Ammunition feeding – MKA 1919, detachable, vertical box magazines
  • Capacity – 2+1, 6+1, or 9+1
  • Sights – A2 style adjustable and detachable rear sight on carry-handle; A2 style adjustable and detachable front sight
  • MSRP – $699.00
The choke style muzzle pieces are hand screwed just like traditional shotgun chokes

The choke style muzzle pieces are hand screwed just like traditional shotgun chokes

The break-down of the Mk-10 VR-100 is achieved by pulling the bolt approximately half way back in the ejection port. This allows the locking bolt lever, located on the front, side of the lower receiver, to be turned releasing the two receivers. The Derya uses levers instead of traditional AR-style pins. The shooter then pulls back and downward on the lower receiver to separate the two receivers.

David "Ben" Bishop shows the first step of the Derya Mk-10 VR-100 break down.

Donald “Ben” Bishop shows the first step of the Derya Mk-10 VR-100 break down. Note the locking lever in front and just above the magazine well, just to the left of the hand-guard.

The Derya Mk-10 VR-100 separated for cleaning or maintenance.

The Derya Mk-10 VR-100 with the receivers separated for cleaning or maintenance.

Started in 2000, Derya already has produced a number of traditional semi-auto and pump shotguns; as well as, box magazine fed options. On the SHOT Show floor I got to talk with American importer, Donald “Ben” Bishop, of Advanced Tactical Imports (NOT to be confused with the “other” ATI importer). Based out of Huntsville, Alabama, Advanced Tactical Imports is currently the exclusive importer of Derya shotguns in the United States. Derya has already made a name for themselves, and established distribution in the European and Middle East firearm markets.

http://advancedtacticalimports.com

The Derya Headquarters building

The Derya Headquarters building expresses the company commitment to modern design and manufacturing. 



Aaron is a life-long firearm enthusiast and hunter. He has been a police officer for nearly 19 years, and currently is a Sergeant in Special Operations. He has served on the department’s SWAT Team for 14 years, with 8 years as the Sniper Team Leader. When not fussing over fractions of inches, and gut-less wonders, he can usually be found sipping from a ridiculously large coffee mug. Aaron is also the editor and main writer at BlueSheepDog.com.


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  • $700 MSRP? That sounds like a pretty damn good deal if it works properly.

  • echelon

    I don’t understand why companies insist on putting carry handles on AR style shotguns? Heck I’d rather have a cheap red dot that withstands 12ga recoil or just some usable iron sights rather than a freakin’ carry handle that’s been outmoded for decades now. C’mon…

    • Mr. FN

      Most likely all the designers have ever seen is an A2 or A3, still fitted with one. More based on some M16 they saw once.

      • Anonymoose

        These are all Turkish guns. The Turkish military uses M16A2s. No surprise they wouldn’t be that hip to all the flattop flip-up BUIS and micro red dot stuff.

        • john huscio

          if i remember right, the turkish military mostly uses HK G-3s

          • Anonymoose

            They use a lot of things.

      • echelon

        I highly doubt the gun makers are going to make a gun that is functional based on “something they saw once.” Most of the world has the internet, it doesn’t take more than a simple search to see modern M4s of every variety.

    • TangledThorns

      I see a button on the handle and the front sight so I bet they come off.

      • Aaron E

        You are correct. Both the front sight and the carry handle rear sight are attached to the full length Picatinny rail and can be removed. Looks like many options will be available.

      • echelon

        Still doesn’t matter. Leave off the dumb removable handle and just but a rear sight on it.

  • mechamaster

    It’s like half-brother of Akdal MKA 1919. Wait, they share the same magazine too.. so interesting.

    • gunslinger

      i first saw the image and thought it was going to be one of those “media guides” with fake names or scary sounding descriptions.

      sholder thing that goes up..heat seaking engagement device…ya know

  • Ethan

    But does it Reliable?

  • Michael R. Zupcak

    Lower receiver is impressive. Looks like a nicely machined block. Everything else seems reasonabley thought-out too (except for the $699 MSRP) However, why does it look like it has a tube magazine under the barrel if it’s fed by detachable box magazines?

    • Cal S.

      It’s the gas-piston cylinder, not a tubular magazine.

    • percynjpn

      You mean $699 is too cheap?

  • JSmath

    Someone please make an alternative upper receiver for this.

    45-70. Or wildcat the .50BMG down to something “reasonable” (term used as loosely as possible) with a 2.9″ max OAL.

    To hell with reason. We have the technology. We have the capability to make the world’s most senseless things. I’m sure at least three people would buy it.

  • TangledThorns

    If it functions then this may be one of my next purchases!

  • Anon E. Mouse

    Looks like a tricked out MKA 1919. Hopefully they got the feeding/ejecting issues fixed so it can use a wider range of ammo. The one I have, even with modifications, is very very picky and will only feed certain types of shells and only eject medium to high powered stuff.

  • Mystick

    Hopefully they aren’t proprietary “12 gauge” rounds feeding this, like the last one I heard about here wanting $3 a piece for their proprietary supposedly non-reloadable “auto”-style cartridge(as opposed to the flanged “rimfire-style” of a normal shotgun shell)

    …and it looks like they put a furniture kit on an otherwise normal receiver there. Kind of like Daisy used to do with their AR-style BB/pellet gun in the 80’s…

    • Risky

      That’s what almost all of the imported AR-style shotguns have been… just dressed up Remington auto clones. I see zero reason to buy any of these AR-style shotguns when a Vepr 12 is still available for not much more cash. They’re light years ahead in durability, function and even form.

  • HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

    Your “photo” of the Derya Headquarters is amazing.

  • DannyBoy

    friends don’t let friends buy turkish guns

    • iksnilol

      Why? Turkish gats are decent if not good. Just like Chinese and Russian guns. Might not be as nicely finished as a Swiss, German or high-end (read: custom) American rifle but works more than well enough for most purposes.

  • Giolli Joker

    What about the Utas UTX-12? How do the 2 compare?

  • guest

    All these AR lookalike shotties seem a bit clunky and a little cheesy. I would love to have something sleek, along the lines of a Valtro PM5, semi-auto.