SHOT Show 2015: Les Baer’s New Products

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Les Baer had a good representation of their line at shot. And while there were about two dozen of Les Baer’s esteemed 1911s at the event, the people at Les Baer wanted to remind you that they are pushing a premium product, so those couple dozen guns were housed under a massive structure emblazoned with Les Baer branding.

Upon entering the spacious open air booth, I found one of Les Baer’s representatives and spoke with him about the new announcements for SHOT. The gentleman showed me LB’s two new new products; the GT Monolith Stinger and the GT Monolith Stinger Heavyweight. The Stinger Monolith is, in my opinion, very handsome with its full and uniformly machined dust cover. Have a look at the pictures for a better explanation, but in other words, the Monolith does not have any steel machined off of the front dust cover like most 1911s do. Instead, it retains a full-length and uniform profile cover that adds some weight to the gun. The difference between the Monolith and Heavyweight models is that the Heavyweight has a geometric dust cover, while the standard Monolith has a rounded profile. The flat-bottom dust cover adds about two ounces to the Heavyweight to sap recoil during firing. Pictures below, as well as a scan of the brochure with full specs here.

The Les Baer booth.

The Les Baer booth.

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The Monolith Heavyweight.

The Monolith Heavyweight.

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The GT Monolith Stinger, front profile, note the geometric, flat-bottom dust cover.

The GT Monolith Stinger, front profile, note the geometric, flat-bottom dust cover.

The GT Monolith Stinger, front profile, note the rounded dust cover.

The GT Monolith Stinger, front profile, note the rounded dust cover.

The GT Monolith Stinger.

The GT Monolith Stinger.

The GT Monolith Stinger.

The GT Monolith Stinger.

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James Reeves

James Reeves is a licensed and practicing concealed weapons instructor, the winner of Maxim Magazine’s MAXIMum Warrior, a graduate of Front Sight, the Shooter Performance Institute, and Tier 1 Group, and is an Appleseed-qualified Rifleman. James previously owned and operated a gun shop in Tallahassee, FL and worked as a regional sales representative for distributor/importer, Interstate Arms Company. He is a coverage litigation attorney by day. James likes traveling with his wife, boating, America, photography, guns, gear he doesn’t really need, cold beer, and a little exercise here and there (James is also GORUCK Tough). Above all, James enjoys creating content for TFBTV. Follow James on Twitter @jjreeves.


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  • TomOakheart

    Dang bro what is it with 1911s? There are thousands of models by various companies all of the same gun. I’ve handled, shot, and cleaned (Ugh) my brother-n-law’s Kimber Custom combat II and compared to my Glock, M&P40, and now my Vp9 I don’t understand how such an out dated design is still so sought after. It is functional and cool looking yes, but there have been lot of fire arm advancements since this 1911 model came out. I hate how all these 1911 companies just copy the mold instead of trying something new.

    • Steve_7

      Well Les Baer has been at it for awhile, and his 1911s are among the best there are, so if you want a 1911, a Les Baer is about as good as it gets.
      Personally I’ve never been that enthused about 1911s and I was shooting handguns before all the plastic fantastics came out. .45 ACP just isn’t that interesting to me, the evidence to date is that a good 9mm JHP is just as effective and yes for target shooting it is a low-pressure cartridge but bullseye shooting with .45s isn’t as popular as it was. It’s just a more expensive gun to run because .45 uses more lead and factory ammo is also more expensive, plus it has more muzzle flip and recoil. And what’s the benefit of doing that?
      When Sauer came up with their locking system for the P220 back in the late 60s, at that point the Hi-Power was obsolete and the 1911 was even more obsolete.

  • Mike Goodwin

    Why an “outdated design” 1911 style firearm by Les Baer instead of a plastic cartridge shooter with so-called advancements? It’s somewhat like wearing a Rolex when a $9.98 plastic watch is probably a better timekeeper, at least for a little while.

    • DonDrapersAcidTrip

      “so-called advancements” ya darn tootin. if muskets were good enough for to fend off the british and build america they’re good enough today by golly

  • DonDrapersAcidTrip

    I wonder if people were as obsessive about defending the practicality of their single action army revolvers back when the 1911 came out. “You and your so called ‘detachable box magazines’. hmph!”

  • Mike Goodwin

    I didn’t mean to imply any lack of quality nor function of the modern Glocks, nor of the dozens of newborn Glock inspired black plastic handguns. These newer handguns are a welcome addition to our broad area of interests, freedom of gun ownership, shooting, collecting, buying and selling. Are the petroleum derived handguns more reliable than the 1911 family in a foul and adverse environment? Probably. Lighter weight and more comfortable to carry? Most are. Less expensive? Most likely. So, why have I been a 1911 owner for over 40 years and a Les Baer owner for nearly 20 years? And, I have some of those plastic ones, also! I suppose the point of my original comparison of a Les Baer to a plastic cartridge shooter could be made even plainer. I’ll try one more time. A politically correct, easy to drive and economical to own mini-van is hard to beat for form and function. But, how bland! I prefer my Jeep Wrangler and Z71 Chevy pickup, both being 4×4’s, even though here in Kentucky we do have paved roads, believe it or not! I guess that it’s a pride of ownership “thing”. Now, this discussion is enjoyable, but there’s a much more important question …… What if we were not allowed to own any handguns, metal or plastic? Remember to stay informed and vote! May the question, “Metal or plastic?”, be asked in the gun shops, gun shows, retail stores and between individuals for many, many more years!